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Consider the following directive: (Live Demo)

app.directive('spinner', function() {
  return {
    restrict: 'A',
    scope: {
      spinner: '=',
      doIt: "&doIt"
    },
    link: function(scope, element, attrs) {
      var spinnerButton = angular.element("<button class='btn disabled'><i class='icon-refresh icon-spin'></i> Doing...</button>");
      element.after(spinnerButton);

      scope.$watch('spinner', function(showSpinner) {
        spinnerButton.toggle(showSpinner);
        element.toggle(!showSpinner);
      });
    }
  };
}); 

which is used like this:

<button ng-click="doIt()" spinner="spinIt">Spin It</button>

When spinner's value (i.e. the value of $scope.spinIt in this example) is true, the element should be hidden and spinnerButton should appear instead. When spinner's value is false, the element should be visible and spinnerButton should be hidden.

The problem here is that doIt() is not in the isolated scope, thus not called on click.

What would be the "Angular way" to implement this directive?

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your plunker doesn't work here (toggling) –  Ven May 27 '13 at 14:24
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7 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

My suggestion is to look at what's going on with these spinners. Be a little more API focused.

Relevant part follows. We use a regular callback to indicate when we're done, so the spinner knows to reset the state of the button.

function SpinDemoCtrl($scope, $timeout, $q) {
  $scope.spinIt = false;

  $scope.longCycle = function(complete) {
    $timeout(function() {
      complete();
    }, 3000);
  };

  $scope.shortCycle = function(complete) {
    $timeout(function() {
      complete();
    }, 1000);
  };
}

app.directive('spinnerClick', function() {
  return {
    restrict: 'A',
    scope: {
      spinnerClick: "=",
    },
    link: function(scope, element, attrs) {
      var spinnerButton = angular.element("<button class='btn disabled'><i class='icon-refresh icon-spin'></i> Doing...</button>").hide();
      element.after(spinnerButton);

      element.click(function() {
        spinnerButton.show();
        element.hide();

        scope.spinnerClick(function() {
          spinnerButton.hide();
          element.show();
        });
      });
    }
  };
});

Here's one that expects use of $q. It'll work better with Angular-style asynchronous operations, and eliminates the callback functions by instead having the spinner reset on fulfilment of the promise.

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That is really helpful! Thanks a lot! –  Misha Moroshko May 28 '13 at 11:16
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Yes, it will call doIt in your isolated scope.

You can use $parent.doIt in that case

<button ng-click="$parent.doIt()" spinner="spinIt">Spin It</button>
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I'm confused as to why you are not packaging up everything in the directive as if it's a self-contained module. That's at least what I would do. In other words, you have the click-handler in the HTML, some behavior in the directive and some behavior in the external controller. This makes your code much less portable and more decentralized.

Anyway, you may have reasons for this that are not shared, but my suggestion would be to put all the "Spin It" related stuff in the spinner directive. This means the click-handler, the doIt() function and template stuff all within the link function.

That way there's no need to worry about sharing scope and code entanglement. Or, am I just missing something?

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I think you're close to the mark. AFAICT there'll be some parameterised behaviour (doIt is a dummy work function), and the spinning is the part we want generic. So there comes a need for a way to signal we're done. –  Yuki Izumi May 28 '13 at 10:56
    
For communicating between components, just use $broadcast on the $rootScope from whatever needs to fire a success event and then use a $scope.on() on the directive to consume that event and act on it. That way you can completely decouple your code in a modular fashion, but still have a way to have these distinct components talk to one another. –  Justin L. May 30 '13 at 21:49
    
That seems like it could get unwieldy with multiple instances on the one page. –  Yuki Izumi May 31 '13 at 5:08
    
Fair enough. I'm obviously not fully understanding the intention of this feature, so I'll just step out of this discussion. Cheers! –  Justin L. May 31 '13 at 5:51
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From the AngularJS Documentation (http://docs.angularjs.org/guide/directive):

& or &attr - provides a way to execute an expression in the context of the parent scope. If no attr name is specified then the attribute name is assumed to be the same as the local name. Given and widget definition of scope: { localFn:'&myAttr' }, then isolate scope property localFn will point to a function wrapper for the count = count + value expression. Often it's desirable to pass data from the isolated scope via an expression and to the parent scope, this can be done by passing a map of local variable names and values into the expression wrapper fn. For example, if the expression is increment(amount) then we can specify the amount value by calling the localFn as localFn({amount: 22}).

so inlclude doIt: "&doIt" in your scope declaration, then you can use doIt as a function in your isolated scope.

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I don't know about the 'angular' way of doing things, but i suggest not using an isolated scope but instead just creating a child scope. You then do attrs.$observe to get any properties you need for your directive.

I.E. :

app.directive('spinner', function() {
    return {
        restrict: 'A',
        scope: true, //Create child scope not isolated scope
        link: function(scope, element, attrs) {
            var spinnerButton = angular.element("<button class='btn disabled'><i class='icon-refresh icon-spin'></i> Doing...</button>");
            element.after(spinnerButton);

            //Using attrs.$observe
            attrs.$observe('spinner', function(showSpinner) {
            spinnerButton.toggle(showSpinner);
            element.toggle(!showSpinner);
            });
        }
    };
});

I find this way is better than using '$parent' to escape the isolated scope in other directives (eg ngClick or ngModel) as the end user of your directive does not need to know whether or not using your directive requires them to use '$parent' or not on core angularjs directives.

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I like the idea of child scope, but it looks like $observe checks whether the spinner attribute has changed (which is always false, as it stays spinIt), rather than evaluating it and observing its value. Have a look here: plnkr.co/edit/D9y5f36vKQtR4bPXeOpZ?p=preview –  Misha Moroshko May 28 '13 at 9:10
    
I guess I could do spinner="{{spinIt}}", and it would work: plnkr.co/edit/rSmsEWJG94BtQ39sxExN?p=preview. But, I wonder how could I avoid the {{}} and use it like spinner="spinIt". –  Misha Moroshko May 28 '13 at 9:38
    
You could use $parse for that. i.e. var getter = $parse(attrs.spinIt); scope.spinner = getter(scope). This is a similar way to how ngModel works in angular core –  Clark Pan May 28 '13 at 23:37
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Here is the polished version of the directive I ended up with (based on Yuki's suggestion), in case it helps someone: (CoffeeScript)

app.directive 'spinnerClick', ->
  restrict: 'A'
  link: (scope, element, attrs) ->
    originalHTML = element.html()
    spinnerHTML = "<i class='icon-refresh icon-spin'></i> #{attrs.spinnerText}"

    element.click ->
      return if element.is('.disabled')

      element.html(spinnerHTML).addClass('disabled')

      scope.$apply(attrs.spinnerClick).then ->
        element.html(originalHTML).removeClass('disabled')

Use it like so:

<button class="btn btn-primary" spinner-click="createNewTask()" 
                                spinner-text="Creating...">
  Create
</button>

Controller's code:

TasksNewCtrl = ($scope, $location, $q, Task) ->
  $scope.createNewTask = ->
    deferred = $q.defer()

    Task.save $scope.task, ->
      $location.path "/tasks"
    , (error) ->
      // Handle errors here and then:
      deferred.resolve()

    deferred.promise
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Using CoffeeScript and a FontAwesome icon.

  • No need to manually specify the spinner-text
  • It will just add the spinner content left of the text while loading
  • We must use finally instead of then for the promise otherwise the spinner will stay there on failure?
  • I must use $compile because the contents of the button is dynamically compiled as I am using https://github.com/angular-translate/angular-translate

app.directive 'spinnerClick', ["$compile", ($compile) ->
    restrict: 'A'
    link: (scope, element, attrs) ->
        originalHTML = element.html()
        spinnerHTML = "<i class='fa fa-refresh fa-spin'></i> "

        element.click ->
            return if element.is('.disabled')
            element.html(spinnerHTML + originalHTML).addClass('disabled')
            $compile(element.contents())(scope)
            scope.$apply(attrs.spinnerClick).finally ->
                element.html(originalHTML).removeClass('disabled')
                $compile(element.contents())(scope)
]
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