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I have written the following code, which plays with functions of type function<int(int)>. The functions compose, print, inc and guarded are helpers which combine other functions or produce some external effect. Then I use them to build my programs:

/* start of the program */
function<int(int)> recursion();

function<int(int)> go =
  compose(guarded(10, recursion()), compose(inc, print("go")));

function<int(int)> recursion() {
  return compose(go, print("recursion"));
}

However, when calling recursion()(0), an exception std::bad_function_call was thrown when go was reached the second time but I don't see why. Is there any dangling reference or empty std::function? Moreover, eta-expanding go works:

function<int(int)> go = [](int n) -> int {
  return compose(guarded(10, recursion()), compose(inc, print("go")))(n);
};

What's wrong with the original code? Why does the alternative one work?

Full code:

#include <string>
#include <iostream>
#include <functional>

using namespace std;

/* helper functions, some combinators */

//composing two functions, f1 . f2
function<int(int)> compose(const function<int(int)>& f1, const function<int(int)>& f2) {
  return [f1,f2](int n) -> int {
    return f1(f2(n));
  };
}

function<int(int)> print(const string& msg) {
  return [msg](int n) -> int {
    cout << "print: " << msg << endl;
    return n;
  };
}

function<int(int)> inc = [](int n) -> int {
  cout << "in inc lambda: " << n << endl;
  return n+1;
};

//calls the given function `f` only when `n` is less then `m`
function<int(int)> guarded(int m, function<int(int)> f) {
  auto g = [m,f](int n) -> int { return n<m? f(n) : m; };
  return compose(g, print("guarded"));
}

/* start of the program */
function<int(int)> recursion();

function<int(int)> go =
  compose(guarded(10, recursion()), compose(inc, print("go")));

function<int(int)> recursion() {
  return compose(go, print("recursion"));
}

int main() {
  try {
    recursion()(0);
  } catch (bad_function_call e) {
    cout << "bad_function_call: " << e.what() << endl;
  }
  return 0;
}
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1 Answer 1

up vote 6 down vote accepted

In your original code, recursion() is called during the initialization of go. recursion itself tries to use the value of go, but at that point go has not been initialized yet, causing the problem.

In the alternative code, the initialization of go only assigns a lambda to go without calling recursion. When recursion is called later, go will already have been initialized.

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Oh, right! So calling go in the lambda returned by compose raises the exception. I forgot to consider the order of evaluation. –  suhorng May 27 '13 at 15:17
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