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I have Add button click event how add file:

private void btnAddfiles_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    if (openFileDialog1.ShowDialog() == System.Windows.Forms.DialogResult.OK)
    {
        foreach (String file in openFileDialog1.FileNames)
        {
            System.IO.Stream stream;
            try
            {
                if ((stream = openFileDialog1.OpenFile()) != null)
                {
                    using (stream)
                    {
                        StartBackgroundFileChecker(file);
                    }
                }
            }

            catch (Exception ex)
            {
                MessageBox.Show("Error: Could not read file from disk. Original error: " + ex.Message);
            }
        }                
    }
}

every file that i am pass to StartBackgroundFileChecker(string file) need to open process and check this file before add to my ListBox so i am doing this via BackgroundWorker in order to prevent my GUi to freeze and all work perfect:

private void StartBackgroundFileChecker(string file)
{            
    ListboxFile listboxFile = new ListboxFile();
    listboxFile.OnFileAddEvent += listboxFile_OnFileAddEvent;
    BackgroundWorker backgroundWorker = new BackgroundWorker();
    backgroundWorker.WorkerReportsProgress = true;
    backgroundWorker.DoWork +=
    (s3, e3) =>
    {
        //check my file via another class
    };

    backgroundWorker.RunWorkerCompleted += new RunWorkerCompletedEventHandler(
    (s3, e3) =>
    {
        ///
    });

    backgroundWorker.RunWorkerAsync();
}

when i am finish to read all my files i want to update my UI so if i put this Ui update inside backgroundWorker.RunWorkerCompleted... it update my UI after every call to this function and i am looking for way to do it at the end of all calls

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Do you need every file to run in its own BackgroundWorker ? –  Ahmed KRAIEM May 27 '13 at 15:49
    
IMO BackgroundWorker is not the right tool for this job. Parallel.Foreach may be more suitable here. –  Rotem May 27 '13 at 15:49
1  
The simple solution is to put the foreach loop in the worker instead. And have it generate a List<> with "good" files, one you then use in RunWorkerCompleted to update your UI. –  Hans Passant May 27 '13 at 15:50
    
Parallel.Foreach would block the UI thread. –  Ahmed KRAIEM May 27 '13 at 15:50
    
@Ahmed KRAIEM, no, only after all the files finished –  user2214609 May 27 '13 at 15:51
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3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Most easy way is to keep a counter.

private int numWorkers = 0;

Then increment it as you start each background worker.

using (stream)
{
    Interlocked.Increment(ref numWorkers);
    StartBackgroundFileChecker(file);
}

Assign Same method as event completed to each background worker.

backgroundWorker.RunWorkerCompleted += myCommonCompletedHandler;

Decrement counter in completed event.

public void myCommonCompletedHandler(object sender, RunWorkerCompletedEventArgs e)
{
    if(Interlocked.Decrement(ref numWorkers) == 0) 
    {
      // all complete
    }
}
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You may use this approch with only one BackgroundWorker.

BackgroundWorker backgroundWorker;

private void btnAddfiles_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    if (openFileDialog1.ShowDialog() == System.Windows.Forms.DialogResult.OK)
    {
        backgroundWorker = new BackgroundWorker();
        backgroundWorker.WorkerReportsProgress = true;
        backgroundWorker.DoWork +=
        (s3, e3) =>
        {
            StartBackgroundFileChecker(openFileDialog1.FileNames);   
        };

        backgroundWorker.ProgressChanged +=
        (s3, e3) =>
        {
            //example:
            this.progressBar1.Value = e.ProgressPercentage;
        };

        backgroundWorker.RunWorkerCompleted += new RunWorkerCompletedEventHandler(
        (s3, e3) =>
        {
            ///End Here!!
        });

        backgroundWorker.RunWorkerAsync();
    }
}
private void StartBackgroundFileChecker(string[] files)
{
    for (int i = 0; i < files.Length; i++)
    {
        string file = files[i];
        System.IO.Stream stream;
        try
        {
            if ((stream = openFileDialog1.OpenFile()) != null)
            {
                using (stream)
                {
                    ListboxFile listboxFile = new ListboxFile();
                    listboxFile.OnFileAddEvent += listboxFile_OnFileAddEvent;
                    //Other things...
                }
            }
        }

        catch (Exception ex)
        {
            MessageBox.Show("Error: Could not read file from disk. Original error: " + ex.Message);
        }
        backgroundWorker.ReportProgress((i+1) * 100.0/files.Length, file);
    }
}
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To prevent UI freezing, you can do this:

while (BackgroundWorker.IsBusy()) {
    Application.DoEvents();
}

I go this from the msdn docs, here

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1  
Please do not use DoEvents. It can block your UI and scramble the order of events. BackgroundWorker is perfectly capable of updating the UI without workarounds. –  Dour High Arch May 27 '13 at 16:18
    
I know people say don't use DoEvents, and the cons of using it, but when ever I have used it, I haven't seen anything go wrong with it, and I got it from the MSDN docs, so the reason for the above example. After all, Microsoft would know best, right? –  user959631 May 27 '13 at 16:22
    
@user959631: The central problem of DoEvents is that it causes re-entrancy issues, which are exceptionally tricky to deal with. Just because your particular test scenario didn't uncover a problem doesn't mean that it's not there. Regarding your comment about Microsoft, I can only say: array variance, MethodImplOptions.Synchronized, DoEvents, lock(this), ICloneable, self-synchronizing collections, ... there are many, many things allowed (and even purposely designed into .NET) that should never be used. –  Stephen Cleary May 27 '13 at 18:40
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