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my simple example (compiled working code) just does not sort fruits by their weight.

import java.util.Arrays;

public class Test {

    public static class Fruit implements Comparable<Fruit> {
        public int weight = 0;
        public Fruit(int w) { weight = w; }
        // compare this fruit to a given fruit f
        public int compareTo(Fruit f) {
            return (weight > f.weight) ? 1 : 0;
        }
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {

        // get some fruits (we intentionally create a box for 100 fruits)
        Fruit[] fruits = new Fruit[100];
        for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++) {
            fruits[i] = new Fruit((int)(Math.random() * 50 + 1));
        }

        // sort fruits by weight
        Arrays.sort(fruits, 0, 10);

        // print fruit weights
        for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++) {
            System.out.print(fruits[i].weight + " ");
        }

    }

}

Why it is so?

Alright, in my problem (not about fruits), I have objects that are never pairwise equal, that is why I thought one object is either bigger or smaller than another. So how can I handle this situation when I know that 0 (objects are equal) will never happen?

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1  
if you implement the compareTo operation correctly (see below answers) and, by definition, two values will never be equal, compareTo will just never return 0 - no need to specifically handle something that will not happen. And if - for some reasons - it does happen after a while, your assumption will be wrong, but the implementation still is correct (if compareTo then returns 0). No harm done, right? –  Olaf Kock May 27 '13 at 15:53

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

If weight is never negative then you can try

return weight - f.weight; 

instead of

return (weight > f.weight) ? 1 : 0;

to sort from lowest to highest value.

share|improve this answer
    
I like your solution because return weight - f.weight is much simpler than Integer's return (weight < f.weight) ? -1 : ((weight == f.weight) ? 0 : 1);. Do you know, in my project fruits are never equal, how can I use this fact to prevent returning 0? –  Sophie Sperner May 27 '13 at 15:54
    
@SophieSperner If weight of fruit is always >=0 and all weights are different then you weight - f.weight will never return 0. But in your example fruits can have same weight so I am not really sure how to answer on your comment. –  Pshemo May 27 '13 at 16:03
1  
@assylias True, but I believe that we can assume that weight can't be negative, so for positive numbers weight - f.weight will work fine. In other case Integer.compare(weight, f.weight); would be best option. –  Pshemo May 27 '13 at 16:16
1  
@Pshemo In the context of a Fruit, yes I guess. But this can lead to cheeky bugs so I am always a bit reluctant to use that method. –  assylias May 27 '13 at 16:18
1  
@assylias Yes, my answer would not be correct in case where numbers could be also negative. I updated my answer to prevent that usage for future reader. –  Pshemo May 27 '13 at 16:23

compareTo must return one of 3 values:

  • >0 --> Bigger than

  • 0 --> Equal

  • <0 --> Less than

Your compareTo method only returns 0 or 1; fix that.

share|improve this answer
    
What bigger than what? I missed it absolutely. –  Sophie Sperner May 27 '13 at 15:42
2  
+1 any positive or negative number to be exact.. –  Anirudha May 27 '13 at 15:43
    
1--> This object is bigger (or after, if you want that spelling) the one passed as a parameter. –  SJuan76 May 27 '13 at 15:43
3  
=1 Not correct. compareTo() may return any int value. –  Bohemian May 27 '13 at 15:45
    
@Anirudh corrected, thanks. –  SJuan76 May 27 '13 at 15:50

Use the method public static int compare(int x, int y) from the class java.lang.Integer (since Java 7).

public int compareTo(Fruit f) {
    return Integer.compare(weight, f.weight);
}
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1  
+1 use the libraries! –  assylias May 27 '13 at 16:13

The best approach is to use the JDK-supplied method for comparing int values, which also makes it crystal clear what the code is doing

public int compareTo(Fruit f) {
    return Integer.compare(weight, f.weight);
}

Prior to version 7 java, you have two choices:

public int compareTo(Fruit f) {
    return weight - f.weight; // terse, but slightly obtuse
}

public int compareTo(Fruit f) {
    return new Integer(weight).compareTo(f.weight); // ugly, but supposedly clear
}

My preference is the subtraction, because once you understand it, it's clear from then on.

share|improve this answer
    
No Integer.compare is not the best, because nested call to compare is crap, especially for comparing integers. –  Sophie Sperner May 27 '13 at 15:55
    
@SophieSperner says you... java will in-line it to the subtraction via JIT. It is the clearest code, and that counts for a great deal. –  Bohemian May 27 '13 at 15:58
    
weight - f.weight is much clearer. –  Sophie Sperner May 27 '13 at 15:59
1  
@SophieSperner It's clear if you're familiar with the pattern, but if not it could be puzzling to a new-comer. Clarity is very important. Also, if you were ordering in reverse, f.weight - weight is very similar looking code, but -Integer.compare(weight, f.weight) is clearer. –  Bohemian May 27 '13 at 16:01
    
The subtraction works well when all numbers are expected to be positive and/or small. But -3 - Integer.MAX_VALUE will erroneously return a positive number for example. –  assylias May 27 '13 at 16:12

Your compareTo method should return -1, 0, 1

LESSER = -1;
EQUAL = 0;
BIGGER = 1;
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