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I would like the function 'count' to count the number of entries in 'data' that meet 'critvalue' by the 'operator' = 1 (<), =2 (=), = 3 (>).

count = function(data,critvalue,operator=2) { 
    if (operator == 1){
        sum(data < critvalue)}
    if (operator == 2){ 
        sum(data == critvalue)}
    if (operator == 3){
        sum(data > critvalue)}}

It works on a vector of values:

count(rep(6,10),critvalue=5,operator=1)

When I apply this function to a matrix to count by row, it doesn't work:

m = rbind(1:10,1:10,1:10)
apply(m, 1, count, critvalue = 6)

But when I define the function 'count' to not take the operator argument, it somehow works

count = function(data,critvalue,operator=2) {
     sum(data == critvalue)}

apply(m, 1, count, critvalue = 6)

Any help in figuring out why this doesn't work in the apply function would be greatly appreciated.

Also, I would definitely be interested in base functions that already count like this. I tried 'sum', but don't know how to use it in apply.

sum(m == 6)  #works

apply(m,1,sum,   #no idea how set the criteria for being equal to 6
share|improve this question
    
Your first problem is that m is not a matrix. Read ?matrix and ?c. –  Roland May 27 '13 at 17:42
    
oops, yeah, I noticed that and meant to change it to rbind...just edited the post to reflect that, thanks –  jhjudd May 27 '13 at 18:06

1 Answer 1

I would use switch:

m <- matrix(c(1:10,1:10,1:10),ncol=3)

count <- function(data,critvalue,operator=2) { 
  switch(operator,
         sum(data < critvalue),
         sum(data == critvalue),
         sum(data > critvalue))
}

apply(m, 1, count, critvalue = 6)
#[1] 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0

apply(m, 1, count, critvalue = 6, operator = 3)
#[1] 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 3 3 3

Edit: Why your function does not work.

From ?return:

If the end of a function is reached without calling return, the value of the last evaluated expression is returned.

The last expression of your function is if (operator == 3){ sum(data > critvalue)}.

From ?if:

if returns the value of the expression evaluated, or NULL invisibly if none was (which may happen if there is no else).

So, in case operator != 3 your function returns NULL:

apply(m, 1, count, critvalue = 6)
#NULL

You fix that by using return:

count <- function(data,critvalue,operator=2) { 
  if (operator == 1){
    return(sum(data < critvalue))}
  if (operator == 2){ 
    return(sum(data == critvalue))}
  if (operator == 3){
    return(sum(data > critvalue))}}    

apply(m, 1, count, critvalue = 6)
#[1] 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0

However, switch is more convenient here.

share|improve this answer
    
Great, that works perfectly! Do you know why I couldn't use the if statements? I'm just wondering if it will help me understand the apply function better. Thanks a lot! –  jhjudd May 27 '13 at 18:10
1  
Added an explanation. The problem is not related to apply. –  Roland May 27 '13 at 18:59
1  
Many thanks for taking the time to explain. However, I'm not sure I completely understand. According to your explanation, the last if statement is causing the problem; since the if statements have no return, the end of the function is reached and returns the last evaluate expression: if (operator == 3){...}. However, the function works when data is a vector and the apply function is not used (see second code block in post). If the problem is the lack of returns, why does the function still work on the vector supplied above? –  jhjudd May 27 '13 at 20:48
    
Really? I just tried the first two blocks of code, and got no output when i executed count on the vector. –  Scott Ritchie May 28 '13 at 0:26
    
@jhjudd On my systems (R 3.0.1 Mac OS X, R 3.0.0 Win7) your functions returns NULL if passed a vector and operator!=3. –  Roland May 28 '13 at 7:10

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