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I struggle with some if-else clause and would to have an advise on how to set the logic.

I have the following code:

//if isset a or b
if (isset(a) || isset(b) ) {
        //if isset a
    if (isset(a)) {
            switch(a) {
                case '1' : $num = '1';
                break;
                case '2' : $num = '2';
                break;
                case '3' : $num = '3';
                break;
            }
    //if not isset a check b for $num
        } else if (isset(b)) {
            switch(b){
                case '1' : $num = '1';
                break;
                case '2' : $num = '2';
                break;
                case '3' : $num = '3';
                break;
            }
        }
//if not isset a and b, set default 
} else {
        $num = '1';
    }

The problem is that I did not get it when to use else/ else if. So I would like to know if I`m right with that code and my commented lines.

Thanks alot.

share|improve this question
    
Your else if (isset(b)) is not necessary, because if a is not set, then b has to be set because of your first if clause. You could just use else –  Chris May 27 '13 at 18:46
    
What if both are set? –  bfavaretto May 27 '13 at 18:47
    
Well, that depends on his needs. If a is more important than b, he should use else instead. If not, he could leave it like this. –  Chris May 27 '13 at 18:49
    
It's not necessary but perhaps logical but it's an overhead, yes. What he means is that you could just do if a else if b else num = 1 –  Jonast92 May 27 '13 at 18:49
    
You can remove the outermost if –  arnaud576875 May 27 '13 at 18:49

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Generally, if your if-else structure is too complicated (more than two levels of curly brackets), this is the best time for divide and conquer approach: create functions that solve separated problems.

function getNum(&$a, &$b, $options) { 
  if(isset($a) && in_array($a,$options)) return $a;
  if(isset($b) && in_array($b,$options)) return $b;
  return 1;
}

$options = array(1,'2','whatever');
$num = getNum($a,$b,$options);

With this approach, the problem is just a matter of the function body, so you can solve it separatedly from the rest of the code. And that is the desired easily maintainable structure.

share|improve this answer
    
Hello and thanks. I`m sorry I made a mistake. Thought to shorten the code and was not thinking of only 1 and 2, there are a lot more options than only 2 from the switch. So I updated the code. –  bonny May 27 '13 at 19:04
    
I see - I updated the answer - see the latter part of the code. –  Jan Turoň May 27 '13 at 19:04
    
Okay, this is quiet simple but works only if a and b is numeric. in my case a and b contains strings. –  bonny May 27 '13 at 19:08
    
updated again (and removed the less interesting part of the answer) –  Jan Turoň May 27 '13 at 19:14
    
okay, i tihink this will work. thanks alot. have a nice day. –  bonny May 27 '13 at 19:22

You can avoid a lot of the control flow issues using the following method.

if(isset(a)) {
    $num = a;
} else if(isset(b)) {
    $num = b;
}

$arr = array('1', '2', '3');
if(!in_array($num, $arr)) {
    $num = '1';
}
share|improve this answer
    
hello and thanks. I`m sorry I made a mistake. Thought to shorten the code and was not thinking of only 1 and 2, there are a lot more options than only 2 from the switch. So I updated the code. –  bonny May 27 '13 at 19:02
    
@bonny Updated to handle any number you want to add later. –  andre May 27 '13 at 19:20

Generally, if your if-else structure is too complicated (more than two levels of curly ?brackets), this is the best time for divide and conquer approach: create functions that solve separated problems.

  1. While this is correct, your structure is acceptable. Most programmers would wish that this is changed, but if you are comfortable working this way and you understand it, it will still work.
  2. Secondly, your else if (isset(b)) may or may not be necessary based on whether both can be set. If they can't, you can just replace your else if (isset(b)) with else.

Ok, I am not sure whether you need this, but here is a quick explanation of if, else if, and else.

if (condition) is used to test whether the condition is true or false. If it is true, the code between the { and } is executed. Otherwise, it is not.

else if requires the above if's condition to have been false. If your if's condition is false but any following else if is true, that else if will execute.

Finally, if all the if and else if's conditions have returned false, the else's code is executed.

Hope this helps.

share|improve this answer
//default
$num = '1';

if(isset(a)) {
  $num = a;
} else if(isset(b)) {
  $num = b;
}
share|improve this answer
    
my only issue with this is we don't know id $num = a is valid. If it is this a good solution. –  andre May 27 '13 at 19:21

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