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Why is the length function saying that this 8 character string is 9 characters?

>>> length "Níðhöggr"
9
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It's probably canonically decomposed... –  Kerrek SB May 27 '13 at 19:17
18  
Is it my imagination or are all of your Haskell questions deliberate trick questions? –  Gabriel Gonzalez May 27 '13 at 19:18
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What I find interesting is that the diaresis appears above the first 'g' here, while it is displayed above the 'o' when I copy and paste. I wonder how that comes. –  Daniel Fischer May 27 '13 at 19:30
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@PetrViktorin Something like that, it's above the 'g' in FireFox and Seamonkey, and above the 'o' in Konqueror in the question body, above the 'o' in the title everywhere. –  Daniel Fischer May 27 '13 at 19:49
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Prelude> mapM_ print ("Níðhöggr" :: String) 'N' '\237' '\240' 'h' 'o' '\776' 'g' 'g' 'r' –  res May 28 '13 at 0:09

2 Answers 2

up vote 62 down vote accepted

"Níðhöggr" contains 9 Unicode characters:

U+004E N (Lu): LATIN CAPITAL LETTER N 
U+00ED í (Ll): LATIN SMALL LETTER I WITH ACUTE
U+00F0 ð (Ll): LATIN SMALL LETTER ETH 
U+0068 h (Ll): LATIN SMALL LETTER H 
U+006F o (Ll): LATIN SMALL LETTER O 
U+0308 ̈ (Mn): COMBINING DIAERESIS 
U+0067 g (Ll): LATIN SMALL LETTER G 
U+0067 g (Ll): LATIN SMALL LETTER G 
U+0072 r (Ll): LATIN SMALL LETTER R 

You might want to use "Níðhöggr", which looks the same when printed out, but contains U+00F6 LATIN SMALL LETTER O WITH DIAERESIS instead of the two-character ö combo. In other words, it is in the composed normal form (NFC).

Or you might want "Níðhöggr", which has 10 Unicode characters (the í is split int i and a combining accent). That would be decomposed normal form (NFD).

Google "Unicode normalization" for interesting and/or hairy details. Use this function to normalize Unicode data in Haskell (thanks, Adam Rosenfield!).

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5  
@Dog, the real length in terms of Unicode characters is 9. If you want something else, you may wish to perform conversion to a Unicode normalization form. –  Jukka K. Korpela May 27 '13 at 19:27
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@Dog It's the real length, the string consists of 9 code points. A Char is a code point (not character). –  Daniel Fischer May 27 '13 at 19:27
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@Dog What is a letter? –  Daniel Fischer May 27 '13 at 19:30
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@Dog: I think you want to read this. –  n.m. May 27 '13 at 19:42
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@Dog: In particular, Data.Text.ICU.Break.breakCharacter seems to break the text into just the right units. Note that this operation is locale-dependent (e.g. ll is a single character in some languages and two characters in others, which may be important). –  n.m. May 27 '13 at 19:48

Because your isn't the single character ö (U+00F6 LATIN SMALL LETTER O WITH DIAERESIS); it's U+006F LATIN SMALL LETTER O plus U+0308 COMBINING DIAERESIS.

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