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I'm constructing a fluent interface where I have a base class that contains the bulk of the fluent logic, and a derived class that add some specialized behavior. The problem I'm facing is the return type of the fluent methods in the base class when called from an instance of the derived type. After invoking a method of the base class, only methods of the base class remain available for further fluent invocations.

Changing the order in which the methods are invoked will help it to compile, but it makes it less readable which is kinda the point for fluent interfaces. Is there a way to define some sort of "This" type for the the base class so that all methods return the same type.

Example

public class Field<T>
{
    public Field<T> Name( string name )
    {
    	_name = name;
    	return this;
    }
}

public SpecialField<T> : Field<T>
{
    public SpecialField<T> Special(){ return this; }
}


// !!! Arrgh. Special is not a member of the Field<T> class.
var specialField = new SpecialField()
    .Name( "bing" )
    .Special();

Broken Solution

I've tried solving it by doing something like the following but it's not valid C# :( but at least expresses how I'd like to code the interface.

public class Field<T,TThis> : TThis
    where TThis : Field<T,TThis>
{
    public TThis Name( string name ){...}
}

public SpecialField<T> : Field<T,SpecialField<T>>
{
    public TThis Special(){ return this; }
}
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1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

After poking around some other fluent APIs I found how to do it. It's not quite as clean, but it works well. Basically you introduce an intermediary base class for each derived type that you want to use and it passes the "TThis" type to the actual implementation.

Sample

public FieldBase<T,TThis> 
    where TThis : FieldBase<T,TThis>
{
    public TThis Name( string name ) 
    {
    	_name = name;
    	return (TThis)this;
    }
}

public Field<T> : FieldBase<T,Field<T>>{}

public SpecialFieldBase<T,TThis> : FieldBase<T,TThis>
    where TThis : SpecialFieldBase<T,TThis>
{
    public TThis Special(){ return (TThis)this; }
}

public SpecialField<T> : SpecialFieldBase<T,SpecialField<T>>{}


// Yeah it works!
var = specialField = new SpecialField()
    .Name( "bing" )
    .Special();
share|improve this answer
1  
This looks related to co-variance and contra-variance. blogs.msdn.com/b/csharpfaq/archive/2010/02/16/… In the book A Theory of Objects they spend a section or two discussing the difficulty "self" represents for typing which is why figuring out the typing of "self" or "this" a primary motivation of questions about co- and contra- variance. lucacardelli.name/TheoryOfObjects.html –  Dennis Oct 6 '11 at 15:49
    
Your code do not work. –  adeel41 Aug 8 at 14:42

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