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I'm thinking about this (meta) question for couple of days already:
Is it possible to define valid C# interface, that cannot be implemented in any way?

Possible variations of this question: Is it possible to define such interface in C# 2.0, 3.0, 4.0, 5.0? Is it possible to define such interface that would not even compile when implemented, or that would compile but throw runtime exception?

Edit: I know such interface will be useless just by definition, but is a nice answer for lectures or testing applicants for a programming job how good they know C#.

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closed as not constructive by George Stocker Jun 3 '13 at 19:34

As it currently stands, this question is not a good fit for our Q&A format. We expect answers to be supported by facts, references, or expertise, but this question will likely solicit debate, arguments, polling, or extended discussion. If you feel that this question can be improved and possibly reopened, visit the help center for guidance.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

7  
I'm very curious about the purpose of such an interface – Sten Petrov May 27 '13 at 19:35
7  
I would consider this to be a pretty poor question to test someone's knowledge of C# if the position in question is for a developer who will be using the language as a tool, since it is not a practical problem that they'll face on the job. However it's actually not too bad a question if the position is a spot on the compiler testing team. – Eric Lippert May 28 '13 at 14:44
2  
Moderator Note: This question is not a good fit for Stack Overflow. That doesn't mean it should be deleted, but before you vote to re-open, think to yourself: Do we really need more answers to this question? – George Stocker Jun 3 '13 at 19:35
up vote 17 down vote accepted

Is it possible to define valid C# interface that cannot be implemented?

This trivia question is not a good fit for StackOverflow, but what the heck, it is easily answered. (Wrongly, as it turns out! Read on!)

class C
{
    private C() {}
}
interface IFoo<T> where T : C, new()
{
}

IFoo<T> cannot be implemented for any T because there is no type argument that can be substituted for T. C doesn't work because C does not have a public parameterless constructor, and there can be no derived class of C because the default constructor is private. (Well, there could be an accessible derived class of C inside C, but there isn't in this case.)


UPDATE: Commenter "mike z" correctly points out that

class X<T> : IFoo<T> where T : C, new() {}

implements the interface, though of course now there is no way to instantiate X<T>!

Even better, user "GranBurguesa" points out that a derived class of C is permitted to be declared, just so long as it never calls the private constructor; this is only possible if it crashes and dies on instantiation. (Well, to be picky, it would also be permitted for the recursive calls to be optimized down to an infinite loop instead of a crash.)

Both devious workarounds pose a philosophical question: if an interface is implemented by a class no one can instantiate, is it really implemented? Of course GranBurguesa demonstrates that IFoo<D> can be implemented and constructed, so my answer is actually wrong.


There are also cases, such as the one hinted at in SLaks' deleted answer, in which an abuse of the generic mechanism leads to an "infinitary" type. Such types are not legal in the CLR; the C# design team has considered adding similar language to the C# compiler spec but hasn't gotten around to it yet. Use of these types can crash the compiler or the runtime.

For an example of an infinitary type that crashes the compiler, see my article:

To Infinity But Not Beyond


Here's one. Cut n paste this code into Visual Studio and you'll see that this interface cannot be implemented:

interface ΙAmAPerfectlyOrdinaryInterface { }

class C : IAmAPerfectlyOrdinaryInterface { }

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1  
But why does this even compile? Isn't it statically clear that C's constructor is not accessible in any way and therefore there isn't any T that can meet the constraints? Shouldn't the compiler catch this? – InBetween May 28 '13 at 6:04
    
This is a nice example, thanks. – Martin Suchan May 28 '13 at 12:52
7  
@InBetween: The answers to your three questions are: (1) because it is a legal program, (2) yes, and (3) the compiler is not required to catch every dumb thing that a developer does; the compiler is only required to catch the ones that the specification says it is required to catch. Error detection is expensive and difficult and so like any feature, error detection algorithms must be prioritized against other features in terms of their costs and benefits. The benefit of such an error detector is very small because this is highly contrived code, and the consequence of the error is obvious. – Eric Lippert May 28 '13 at 13:48
3  
If I defined class Foo<T> : IFoo<T> where T : C, new() { } would that not implement the interface? I realize, as you stated, there is no actual type T that could be used. Is there some general term used to distinguish a "substantive" implementation (which does not exist here) from a "non-substantive" one (like Foo<T>)? – mike z May 28 '13 at 20:15
1  
@mikez: You are absolutely right; I did not consider that. Nice one! – Eric Lippert May 28 '13 at 20:18

As long as we're talking trivia, I think this is a valid implementation of Eric Lippert's attempt:

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        D test = new D();
    }
}

class C
{
    private C() { }
}

interface IFoo<T> where T : C, new() { }

class D : C
{
    public D()
        : this(5) { }

    public D(int x)
        : this() { }
}

class Dfoo : IFoo<D> { }

It compiles fine but crashes with a StackOverflowException when you instantiate D.

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9  
I was on the C# compiler team for the better part of a decade and I still learn new stuff about this language all the time. I did not realize that the compiler would allow you to override a class if the base class ctor was never called, but of course this makes perfect sense. Thanks for this great example! – Eric Lippert May 28 '13 at 20:27
1  
I'll do you one better: the lack of CLR validation of parent calls makes it possible to construct derived-type instances and expose them to parent code. See my answer. – supercat Jun 1 '13 at 0:30

If you're trying to factor out an old interface you could mark the interface with the ObsoleteAttribute attribute.

Edit: as @Magnus noted in the comments, if you set the Error attribute to true it's usage will cause an error.

share|improve this answer
    
That does not render the interface unusable, though. – Renan May 27 '13 at 19:41
4  
@Renan if the error parameter is set in the ctor it is pretty much unusable. – Magnus May 27 '13 at 19:45
    
@Magnus didn't know about that property ... msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/… – xandercoded May 27 '13 at 19:49
    
In that case I would like to remove my downvote, however now I can't unless the post is edited :/ – Renan May 27 '13 at 19:50
    
@Xander Upvoted. – Renan May 27 '13 at 19:53

If a type is accessible and unsealed, it will be possible for outside code to create instances of that type and there isn't really anything the base type can do about it. No "full trust" or Reflection required.

public class CantDeriveMe
{
    private CantDeriveMe()
    {
    }
    public override string ToString()
    {
        return "My type is " + this.GetType().ToString();
    }
}

public class OhYeah : CantDeriveMe
{
    static OhYeah CapturedInstance;

    ~OhYeah()
    {
        CapturedInstance = this;
    }

    OhYeah() : this(1/String.Empty.Length)
    {
    }
    OhYeah(int blah) : this()
    {
    }
    public static OhYeah Create()
    {
        try
        {
            new OhYeah(4);
        }
        catch (DivideByZeroException)
        {
            GC.Collect();
            GC.WaitForPendingFinalizers();
        }
        return CapturedInstance;
    }
    public static void test()
    {
        OhYeah it;
        it = OhYeah.Create();
        Console.WriteLine("Result was ({0})", it);
    }
}

Note that if code is written only in C#, a base-class destructor might squawk if it notices that the object isn't of a legitimate type, but code written in languages other than C# would allow the override of Finalize to exit without chaining to its parent.

I think it's possible to specify an open generic interface with a combination of struct and class constraints which no combination of types could possibly fulfill, e.g.

public interface evil<T, U>
    where T : struct,U
    where U : class

I'm not sure whether such an open-generic type would really qualify as an "interface", though, or whether only closed generic types can really qualify as interfaces (or classes, or structs).

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6  
Holy goodness this is devious. Nice work. I wonder if there is an attack you could mount based on this? – Eric Lippert Jun 1 '13 at 3:47
    
I dont understand you. What's stopping me from doing class MyClass : evil<int, IConvertible> ? – nawfal Jun 3 '13 at 7:56
    
@nawfal: Hmm... Only thing stopping me was that I forgot the distinction between interfaces and interface-type storage locations, which is ironic since I've written often about it. – supercat Jun 3 '13 at 15:18
    
@EricLippert: I think the class that wants to limit inheritance could prevent such a trick by declaring a new protected virtual method named Finalize. It's too bad there's no way to declare a new sealed virtual method, since having Finalize sealed would prevent any class that tries to override it from even loading. That would require changing the classes that are supposed to forbid inheritance, though. Do you think any legitimate programs would break if the .NET class loader were changed to forbid classes which have at least one constructor but no chained calls to a parent constructor? – supercat Jun 3 '13 at 15:38
    
@EricLippert: As for mounting an attack, it is certainly possible to construct instances of derived types that the base class isn't expecting. Personally, I think Finalize should be a member of something like System.FinalizableObject rather than System.Object, since in most cases where a class Foo would inherit finalizer-less Bar but hold an unmanaged resource, the proper approach is to encapsulate the resource into its own class object (which could inherit FinalizableObject) and have Foo hold a reference to that. Too late for that now, though. – supercat Jun 3 '13 at 15:46

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