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I tried compiling my code without templates and it works just fine when I add the template code I get a 2019LNK error.

I have the following at the beginning of my class:

template<typename T>
friend void inchealth(T &,int);

declaration of function:

template<typename T>
void inchealth(T &x, int y)
{x.health += y;}

(health is a member variable of my class)

EDIT here is the exact code:

class archer        
{

template <class T>
friend void inchealth(T &,int);

public:
archer(){health = 150; mana = 50; armor = 50; damage = 10;}

int checkhealth() {return health;}
int checkmana() {return mana;}
int checkarmor() {return armor;}
int checkdamage(){return damage;}


private:
int health;
int mana; 
int armor;
int damage;};

template <class T>
void inchealth(T &x, int y)
{x.health += y;}

void main()
{
archer a;
inchealth(a,5);

}
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1  
More context needed. Also, is the error the same if you leave the inchealth body empty (it should)? –  K-ballo May 27 '13 at 20:33
    
C++03 or C++11? –  selalerer May 27 '13 at 20:35
    
In what file is inchealth defined? –  n.m. May 27 '13 at 20:47
1  
Can't reproduce –  Andy Prowl May 27 '13 at 20:49
1  
It don't know if it has anything to do with your problem, but you should declare main as int main() –  GuyRT May 27 '13 at 20:59

1 Answer 1

My psychic debugging senses suggest you've put the definition of inchealth in a separate cpp file to main.

Templated function bodies need to be visible at the point where you call them, or you need to explicitly tell the compiler to instantiate the versions you want.

So, if I am correct, the solution is either move the definition of inchealth to a header #included from the file that defines main, or to add the line

template void inchealth<archer>(archer&,int);

below the definition of inchealth in the file where it is defined (assuming the declaration of archer is visible there`). The former is preferred.

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