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Based on previous question, I've changed the context as follow:

I have abstract class called Tenant and CustomerList. The Tenant in this case is like owner of the application for multi tenant application model and CustomerList is a collection of Customer class.

The relationship between these 2 class are Many to One relationship.

public abstract class Tenant 
{    
  protected Int32 id;    
  protected String name;    
  public Int32 ID { get; set; }    
  public String Name { get; set; }    
  public abstract bool Add();    
  public abstract bool Update();    
  public abstract bool Delete();  
}

public class ApplicationTenant: Tenant
{    
   public ApplicationTenant() { }    
   public override Int32 ID    
   {      
      get { return id; }         
      set { id = value; }    
   }    
   public override String Name    
   { 
     get { return name; }         
     set { name= value; }    
   }    
}

public abstract class CustomerList
{
   protected Tenant tenant;

   public abstract Tenant Tenant {get; set;} 

   public abstract List<Customer> GetAll();   
}

public abstract class CorporateCustomerList : CustomerList
{
   privateT enant tenant;

   public override Tenant Tenant 
   {
     get(return tenant;) ; 
     set(Tenant = tenant);
   }


   public override List<Customer> GetAll()
   {     
      ... calling from data service
      return t;
   }
}

With the OO design above, we know that method of List GetAll(); needs to be overrided.

BUT the issue are:

1) The return value of the GetAll() in the CorporateCustomer is always going to be List<CorporateCustomer>. It meeans that I have to override List<Customer> Get() without being implementation and create another following method

public List<CorporateCustomer > GetAll()  {     return ???;  }

2) If I override anyway for this method above and on the return I just cast it ... it won't work anyway. ?!!? Can't casting to List from List

3) The property below:

public override Tenant Tenant    
{         
   get { return tenant; }         
   set { tenant= value; }    
}

means again I have to override this BUTI don't I really used this cause the CorporateCustomer is always going to be used the ApplicationTenant instead as return NOT Tenant.

public CorporateTenant Tenant    
{         
   get { return corporateTenant; }         
   set { corporateTenant= value; }    
}

So is this the right design? Cause it's kinda waste of the abstraction.

Some people suggests to use Generic abstract class instead which I am not sure it's going to help anyway. I did try to use generic on the method but the definition of the definition needs to be the same from the top level of abstrction.

Thanks

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3 Answers 3

Unfortunately, you've come across (IMO) the two main failings and pitfalls of C# - override and generic co- and contra-variance. I'll address the problems in the most sensible order

With regards to problem 3, you cannot override a method returning a BaseClass with a method returning an SubClass. C# does not allow you to change method parameters when overriding, even if the change will be type-safe, and from what I gather this will not be addressed anytime soon, as it is quite a severe breaking change, and CLR dependent. A workaround is to change CustomerList to an interface (which should be OK, as it's only got abstract members) and do something like this (ignoring GetAll for the moment):

public interface ICustomerList
{
    Tenant Tenant {get; set;}
}

public abstract class CorporateCustomerList : ICustomerList
{
    private CorporateTenant tenant;

    public CorporateTenant Tenant 
    {
        get { return tenant; }
        set { tenant = value; }
    }

    Tenant ICustomerList.Tenant 
    {
        get { return Tenant; }
        set { Tenant = value; }
    }
}

Your other problem with GetAll is that List<BaseClass> is not in any way castable or convertable to List<SubClass> - this is a common problem on SO, and will be somewhat addressed for generic interfaces in C#4. There are several workarounds:

  1. Use an array to store your customers, have GetAll return an IList rather than a List, and override using an explicit interface implementation as above - due to historical reasons, arrays do support element type covariance (sorry about the formatting, markdown seems to be doing odd things)

    public interface ICustomerList
    {
        public IList<Customer> GetAll();
    }
    
    
    public abstract class CorporateCustomerList : ICustomerList
    {
        private CorporateCustomer[] customers;
    
    
    
    public IList&lt;CorporateCustomer&gt; GetAll()
    {
        get { return customers; }
        set { customers= value; }
    }
    
    
    IList&lt;Customer&gt; ICustomerList.GetAll()
    {
        get { return customers; }
        set { customers = value; }
    }
    
    }
  2. Change GetAll to return an IEnumerable<T> rather than a List<T>, then use the yield return syntax to turn an IEnumerable<CorporateCustomer> into an IEnumerable<Customer>, but is slightly more complicated with the setter...

    public abstract class CorporateCustomerList : ICustomerList
    {
        // as above...
        private CorporateCustomer[] customers;
    
    
    
    IEnumerable&lt;Customer&gt; ICustomerList.GetAll()
    {
        get
        {
            foreach (CorporateCustomer c in customers)
            {
                yield return c;
            }
        }
    }
    
    }

Hope this gives you some ideas...

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this is messy..... I don't think you have clear concepts? something called a list, should be a list not a container for another list? I'm actually unsure what you are trying to abstract. Tenant seems like the wrong thing?

its hard to tell from your example.

but a tenant is really a Person/Entity that has a 'Contract' called a "tennancy"..... I'm not sure about the rest of your question as there isn't enough context

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I have abstract class called Customer. To get the collection of Customer (GetAll()) doesn't make sense if I put under here ... so I need to put under CustomerList (or Customers). –  dcalliances Nov 5 '09 at 22:37

As an aside, whenever you're representing real people in any application, consider using Person and Role classes. That way, you can give any Person any number of responsibilities, and you don't have to create weird and wonderful class hierarchies.

For your example, you'll have several Roles:

public class Customer : Role
{
 ...
}

public class CorporateCustomer : Role
{
 ...
}

public class Tenant : Role
{
 ...
}

And a Person class that looks like this:

public class Person
{
   Details Details {get;set;}
   IList<Role> Roles {get;set;}
}

Use the Role classes to encapsulate the appropriate logic.

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