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I understand the advantages of composition over inheritance. Among others, it makes unit testing (and mocking) easier, your code is not coupled with base class etc. I've also watched nice talks about testable, clean code, which successfully stick the ideas in my mind through excellent pictures like this:

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I tried posts that explain the meaning of abstract classes, but it's still not clear to me: Since I can achieve polymorphic behaviour through interfaces, and I can delegate tasks to my dependencies through composition, where should I use abstract classes, or even base concrete classes?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

One advantage is convenience. An abstract class can provide default implementations. You can override only the methods you want, without needing to implement all the others at all.

For example, Java's MouseListener interface has five methods; and the abstract class MouseAdapter provides default implementations of those. An implementation based on extending the abstract class MouseAdapter needs to implement only the desired methods.

Another advantage is that superclass method calls can call subclass methods. For example, the C++ non-virtual idiom uses this to allow a superclass method to enforce the method contract before and after delegating to a subclass method.

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maybe it's stupid idea, but tell me if I'm wrong: Still, couldn't I use an interface I that has plenty of methods, then have class A implementing I with default implementation of those, and then more classes B and C that implement I and have A, so they implement only few methods and delegade the rest to A? –  zafeiris.m May 27 '13 at 23:28
1  
Yes, but it would be less convenient, and A might not be able to call some of the overridden instance methods of B and C. –  Andy Thomas May 28 '13 at 3:45
1  
Also if a new method is added or a method signature changed you have to update your code. –  WChargin May 28 '13 at 3:46

If you did away with abstract classes, how would you implement part of an interface in a reusable way? You would create an interface and some helper class that did the implementation that you could delegate to, but this helper class would not implement the interface and so it would not be clear that it is related to the interface. You would have decoupled too much.

Alternately, you would have people fully implementing the interface so that other people would know it has a base implementation, but then they would have to do some hack to indicate that certain methods had to be overridden (e.g. throw an exception when they were called).

Abstract classes provide a clean way to provide an interface along with a partial implementation of the interface that is visible to the complier and other tools.

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Abstract classes are still quite useful for cases in which it is desirable to share implementation, as opposed to interface (in the generic sense).

For example, consider the template method design pattern. This is an example of shared implementation. The bulk of an algorithm is implemented in an abstract base class, but certain pieces are supplied by subclasses. These subclasses need only extend their base class and implement the abstract template method(s) in them to get the job done.

Contrast this with the strategy pattern, where the entire algorithm is abstracted and implementations are injected wholesale into classes that require them using delegation/composition. This is an example of shared interface. Though the algorithms themselves may be totally different, they all implement the same basic operations.

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Inheritance is still useful even you have used composition. IMHO, this explicitly apply for framework architecture.

  • Facade parent class

    You can use facade class to wrap your composition over inheritance. Example will be:

    public class Parent : IService
    {
        public Parent(IService1 s1, IService2 s2)
        {
    
        }
    }
    
    public class Child : Parent
    {
        public Child()
            : base(Service1, Service2)
        {
    
        }
    
        private static IService1 Service1
        {
            get
            {
                // return Service1
            }
        }
    
        private static IService2 Service2
        {
            get
            {
                // return Service2
            }
        }
    }
    

    Source Syntax. This facade class, can be used as default functioning object, useful in framework-level object. Then if inherited again, you can extend the functionality for one method only, and leave the rest as is.

  • Extend third party library

    Not all third party library use Dependency Injection. In order to extend the functionality, you often need to inherit it (example: System.Windows.Forms.Form). Especially in custom Framework level (enterprise), it is better to inherit it. If the framework change, other method than your overridden will be changed as well, rather than use composition. It may be double-edged though.

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