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I'm working on a java homework assignment and part of that assignment is writing a program to find prime numbers. I understand there is a rule that a square root of a number will help determine whether a given number is prime or not. I don't fully understand the concept. Take 37 which is a prime number. If I take the square root of 37 it is 6.0827. So the rule as I understand it is that I don't need to test and divide 37 against any number greater than the square root, which is, rounded down to 6.

My question is, if you stop at 6, how do you know that your given number is not divisible by 8? Is my understanding correct in the relationship between prime numbers and their square root or am I missing something?

37 % 2 = (2 * 18 = 36) remainder 1

37 % 3 = (3 * 12 = 36) remainder 1

37 % 4 = (9 * 4 = 36) remainder 1

37 % 5 = ( 7 * 5 = 35) remainder 2

37 % 6 = ( 6 * 6 = 36) remainder 1

Rule says stop at this point. ------------

37 % 7 = ( 7 * 5 = 35 ) remainder 2

37 % 8 = ( 8 * 4 = 32) remainder 5

37 % 9 = (9 * 4 = 36) remainder 1

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closed as off topic by Old Pro, woodchips, hammar, Carl Veazey, CloudyMarble May 28 '13 at 3:43

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It's a good question but it's also a math question, not a programming one; so I'm voting to close as off topic. –  djechlin May 27 '13 at 23:02
    
@djechlin it might be a math question, but it's about how a common algorithm works. Would you close vote a question about the Miller-Rabin algorithm? I mean, it's a fairly common algorithm for solving a practical problem. However it requires higher level math like Fermat's little theorem. –  Benjamin Gruenbaum May 27 '13 at 23:05
    
@BenjaminGruenbaum how to implement it? No. Why it works, especially given that it involves higher level math? Yes. The OP is asking why it works, which is great, but off topic. –  djechlin May 27 '13 at 23:05
    
@BenjaminGruenbaum I was digging around on math.stackexchange for this, I found related questions but am not savvy enough searching there. –  djechlin May 27 '13 at 23:06
1  
Um, suppose 37 WAS divisible by 8 (which is larger than sqrt(37)), then what is 37/8? Would this number be larger or smaller than sqrt(37)? –  user85109 May 28 '13 at 1:19

3 Answers 3

It's Math.

Let's say your number is x , and your number x is not prime. Then there have to by m and n such that mn=x.

Now, if m=n=sqrt(x) we know that mn=x indeed, otherwise, at least one of them is greater than x, and at least one is smaller.

The smaller one, has to be smaller than the root (otherwise we'd be multiplying two larger than root numbers), so your algorithm will hit it first.

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in every case without exception no matter how big the number? –  Jessica M. May 27 '13 at 23:00
    
@JessicaM. did you follow Benjamin's logic? –  djechlin May 27 '13 at 23:01
    
@JessicaM. You can obtain composite numbers by multiplying two numbers, if both of them are bigger than the root than the result also is, so one of them has to be smaller. That's because both are at least as big (let's say one is sqrt(x)+k and the other sqrt(x)+j we get (sqrt(x)+k)(sqrt(x)+j) = x+sqrt(x)(j+k)+kj which is bigger than x. –  Benjamin Gruenbaum May 27 '13 at 23:03
    
@djechlin I'm thinking about it right now. –  Jessica M. May 27 '13 at 23:03
    
@JessicaM. Did you figure it out? –  Benjamin Gruenbaum Jun 9 '13 at 21:14

Let's look at a non-prime number to illustrate.

36 / 1 =    36
36 / 2 =    18
36 / 3 =    12
36 / 4 =     9
36 / 6 =     6

Notice that as the numbers on the left go up, those on the right go down. (I wrote them in order, starting with the smallest factors.) When they run into each other (6 and 6) we're at the square root. I wrote them in order, starting with the smallest factors.

Remember that factors come in pairs. If were to continue past this point, I'd just repeat the same pairs again:

36 /  9 =    4
36 / 12 =    3
36 / 18 =    2
36 / 36 =    1

So by searching up to the square root, I've already found all (pairs of) factors.

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Maybe try squaring integers starting from 1 and checking if the square is equal to the the possible prime number (let's call it n), until the square is bigger than n?

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1  
a.k.a. the number is bigger than the square root of n. –  djechlin May 27 '13 at 23:01
    
@djechlin Well said. –  Dan Ross May 27 '13 at 23:03

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