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I have reaction time and accuracy data that needs to be scored for each subject and I want to know which R package or functions would best meet my needs. Below is a snippet of what the data looks like for 2 subjects. Each row represents a single trial where the subject responds to a stimulus.

 date subject trialn blockcode     trialtype latency response correct
32913      15      1  practice    taskswitch    1765      205       1
32913      15      2  practice     cueswitch    4372      203       1
32913      15      3  practice cuerepetition    2523      203       0
32913      15      1      test     cueswitch    2239      205       1
32913      15      2      test cuerepetition    1244      203       1
32913      15      3      test    taskswitch    1472      203       0
32913      15      4      test     cueswitch    1877      205       1
32913      15      5      test    taskswitch    2271      203       1
30413      16      1  practice    taskswitch    1377      203       1
30413      16      2  practice    taskswitch    1648      203       1
30413      16      3  practice     cueswitch    1181      205       1
30413      16      1      test     cueswitch    1045      205       1
30413      16      2      test cuerepetition     969      203       0
30413      16      3      test     cueswitch     857      203       1
30413      16      4      test    taskswitch    1038      205       1
30413      16      5      test cuerepetition     836      203       0

Here's a description of what I'd like to do:

  • Looking only at "test" trials, for each subject, calculate
    • the total number of trials
    • number of trials with latencies (i.e. reaction times) below 300ms
    • mean latency
    • mean correct
  • Then, looking only at trials with latencies within 3 standard deviations of the subject's mean latency, calculate the mean latency for each trialtype
  • Lastly, create a new data frame with all these variables and the subject ID and date
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closed as too broad by Andrew Barber Aug 10 at 5:24

There are either too many possible answers, or good answers would be too long for this format. Please add details to narrow the answer set or to isolate an issue that can be answered in a few paragraphs.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Stackoverflow isn't really meant for tutorials, so make sure to check out the great online resources about data.table. The website is a good start and there are many questions about the package here on SO that cover almost anything.

Here, I only want to show you how easy it can be if you are used to the syntax of the package.

First, let's load the package and read in your data:

library(data.table)
str <- "date subject trialn blockcode     trialtype latency response correct
        32913      15      1  practice    taskswitch    1765      205       1
        32913      15      2  practice     cueswitch    4372      203       1
        32913      15      3  practice cuerepetition    2523      203       0
        32913      15      1      test     cueswitch    2239      205       1
        32913      15      2      test cuerepetition    1244      203       1
        32913      15      3      test    taskswitch    1472      203       0
        32913      15      4      test     cueswitch    1877      205       1
        32913      15      5      test    taskswitch    2271      203       1
        30413      16      1  practice    taskswitch    1377      203       1
        30413      16      2  practice    taskswitch    1648      203       1
        30413      16      3  practice     cueswitch    1181      205       1
        30413      16      1      test     cueswitch    1045      205       1
        30413      16      2      test cuerepetition     969      203       0
        30413      16      3      test     cueswitch     857      203       1
        30413      16      4      test    taskswitch    1038      205       1
        30413      16      5      test cuerepetition     836      203       0"
DT <- as.data.table(read.table(text=str, header=TRUE))

Now, this is one thing that you asked for:

Looking only at "test" trials, for each unique subject calculate the total number of trials, number of trials with latencies (i.e. reaction times) below 300ms, mean latency mean correct (i.e. accuracy).

DT[blockcode=="test", 
   list(TotalNr = .N,
        NrTrailLat = sum(latency < 300),
        MeanLat = mean(latency),
        MeanCor = mean(correct)), 
   by="subject"]
subject TotalNr NrTrailLat MeanLat MeanCor
1:      15       5          0  1820.6     0.8
2:      16       5          0   949.0     0.6

Basically, with those few lines of code I could answer all those questions. And in my opinion, the syntax is pretty straightforward as well. For our DT, we only want to look at observations where blockcode=="test". Next, we want to run all analysis for each subject separately. That's easily done with the by="subject" statement. The cool thing: if you want to split by several dimensions, just add them...Instead of ignoring practice, let's look at them separately:

DT[, 
   list(TotalNr = .N,
        NrTrailLat = sum(latency < 300),
        MeanLat = mean(latency),
        MeanCor = mean(correct)), 
   by="subject,blockcode"]
   subject blockcode TotalNr NrTrailLat  MeanLat   MeanCor
1:      15  practice       3          0 2886.667 0.6666667
2:      15      test       5          0 1820.600 0.8000000
3:      16  practice       3          0 1402.000 1.0000000
4:      16      test       5          0  949.000 0.6000000

Now don't tell me this isn't awesome!

Let's try another one:

Also, create variables containing the last (or first) value of the date and subjectID (this is in order to place data and subjectID in a new dataframe).

I'm not sure what you mean here exactly because date does not change in your example for each subject. So let's make it a little bit harder. Let's say we want to know the latency for each subject,blockcode combination for the first trial. To do so, we should first sort DT so that we know that the first trialn is always 1. (This is not really necessary with this examplatory data because it seems sorted already).

setkey(DT, subject, blockcode, trialn)
DT[, list(FirstLat = latency[1]) , by="subject,blockcode"]
subject blockcode FirstLat
1:      15  practice     1765
2:      15      test     2239
3:      16  practice     1377
4:      16      test     1045

However, you wanted to add this as a new column in DT. To do so, you can use the := operator:

DT[, FirstLat := latency[1] , by="subject,blockcode"]  
DT
date subject trialn blockcode     trialtype latency response correct FirstLat
1: 32913      15      1  practice    taskswitch    1765      205       1     1765
2: 32913      15      2  practice     cueswitch    4372      203       1     1765
3: 32913      15      3  practice cuerepetition    2523      203       0     1765
4: 32913      15      1      test     cueswitch    2239      205       1     2239
5: 32913      15      2      test cuerepetition    1244      203       1     2239
6: 32913      15      3      test    taskswitch    1472      203       0     2239
7: 32913      15      4      test     cueswitch    1877      205       1     2239
8: 32913      15      5      test    taskswitch    2271      203       1     2239
9: 30413      16      1  practice    taskswitch    1377      203       1     1377
10: 30413      16      2  practice    taskswitch    1648      203       1     1377
11: 30413      16      3  practice     cueswitch    1181      205       1     1377
12: 30413      16      1      test     cueswitch    1045      205       1     1045
13: 30413      16      2      test cuerepetition     969      203       0     1045
14: 30413      16      3      test     cueswitch     857      203       1     1045
15: 30413      16      4      test    taskswitch    1038      205       1     1045
16: 30413      16      5      test cuerepetition     836      203       0     1045

So those are just some thoughts to get you started. I took this effort because I wanted to show you that most things become quite easy when you understand the basics. This should be motivation to make it through the manuals which can be a little bit overkill at the beginning. But it's worth the effort, believe me! Because I haven't even mentioned the best part: data.table is also very fast. So good luck with your analysis.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you so much for the quick tutorial. I think both data.table and plyr are great options and I'm tempted to try both. I'll get started reading :) –  AlexR May 28 '13 at 17:57

The plyr package is convenient for this sort of thing (also data.table, but I don't know its syntax). Here's an example to get started:

my_function <- function(tmp){
  data.frame(n_trials = sum(tmp[ ,'trialn']),
             n_trialslat  = sum(tmp[tmp[,'latency'] <= 300 ,'trialn']),
             mean_latency = mean(tmp[,'latency']))
}
library(plyr)
ddply(subset(d, blockcode == "test"), 'subject', my_function)
share|improve this answer
    
I added some thoughts about data.table. –  Christoph_J May 28 '13 at 7:35
    
Thanks for the demonstration and for suggesting plyr and data.table. It was a tough choice accepting the best answer as they are both very helpful. –  AlexR May 28 '13 at 17:59

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