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Hi I was wondering if someone could explain to me why the map function written in the below code is written in the way its written. Specifically why do we need to do

results = letters.map do |letter| encrypted_letter = encrypt_letter(letter) 

instead of just doing

results = letters.map do |letter| encrypt_letter(letter)

class Encryptor
    def cipher
    {"a" => "n", "b" => "o", 'c' => 'p', 'd' => 'q',
           'e' => 'r', 'f' => 's', 'g' => 't', 'h' => 'u',
         'i' => 'v', 'j' => 'w', 'k' => 'x', 'l' => 'y',
         'm' => 'z', 'n' => 'a', 'o' => 'b', 'p' => 'c',
         'q' => 'd', 'r' => 'e', 's' => 'f', 't' => 'g',
         'u' => 'h', 'v' => 'i', 'w' => 'j', 'x' => 'k',
         'y' => 'l', 'z' => 'm'}
    end

    def encrypt_letter(letter)
        lowercase_letter = letter.downcase
        cipher[lowercase_letter]
    end

    def encrypt(string)
        letters = string.split("")
        results = letters.map do |letter|
            encrypted_letter = encrypt_letter(letter)
        end
        results.join
    end

    def decrypt_letter(letter)
        lowercase_letter = letter.downcase
        cipher.key(lowercase_letter)
    end

    def decrypt(string)
        letters = string.split("")
        results = letters.map do |letter|
        decrypted_letter = decrypt_letter(letter)
        end

        results.join
    end

end
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3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

There is no functional reason for it. Sometimes programmers feel more comfortable having an explicit variable destination for their results. Maybe this is one of those cases. Same with the decrypted_letter case.

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ok thanks. I was trying to figure it out for quite a while –  JaTo May 28 '13 at 0:09
2  
"Sometimes programmers feel more comfortable having an explicit variable destination for their results."? I'd say it more simply: the person who wrote it didn't know how map works and writes too verbosely. Intermediate variables have their place but shouldn't be assigned to only be used once. –  the Tin Man May 28 '13 at 0:58
    
@the Tin Man... Nowhere did I suggest that it was good practice. I was merely making an observation and somewhat tongue-in-cheek. I wouldn't assume absolutely what's going on inside a programmer's head. –  lurker May 28 '13 at 2:13

No reason; the variable is immediately discarded.

I'd argue it's misleading and uncommunicative on top of it.

Most of the code seems a bit verbose, for example:

def encrypt(string)
    letters = string.split("")
    results = letters.map do |letter|
        encrypted_letter = encrypt_letter(letter)
    end
    results.join
end

IMO this would be more Ruby-esque as something closer to:

def encrypt(str)
  str.chars.collect { |c| encrypt(c) }.join
end

It could be tighter than that, or written in other ways, although some of it is a matter of preference. For example, each_with_object could be used with the shovel operator, but that's less "functional".

(I prefer collect over map when collecting; a preference I find more communicative, if longer.)

Spreading functionality over more lines doesn't make things readable, but it depends on context. People new to Ruby or method chaining might be confused by the (IMO more canonical) one-liner.

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great answer! in what instances should i use "map" to be more communicative? so far I have been only using it to collect –  JaTo May 28 '13 at 0:24
    
@JamieS Like I said, it's a personal preference--map is a well-known construct, I just find the word closer in meaning to each, so when I'm actively gathering results, I like collect. There's no technical reason for my preference, and I may well be in the minority in my preference. I just wanted to explain why I used it in my example :) –  Dave Newton May 28 '13 at 0:28
    
+1. Agreed. Tight code is readable and doesn't waste time getting things done. Assigning to an intermediate value for a single use doesn't improve readability, instead it implies uncertainty about what the code will do and lends an air of artificial readability but results in visual clutter. –  the Tin Man May 28 '13 at 1:05
    
I use map because of too many years writing in Perl. –  the Tin Man May 28 '13 at 1:07
1  
@sawa I think most people aren't aware of tr (I assume that's what you're talking about, anyway), or are looking to implement it "manually" as an exercise if they are. Who knows. –  Dave Newton May 28 '13 at 2:02

As others say, it has no reason. It is obviously a code written by a beginner. In addition to Dave Newton's point, it is a bad habit to define a constant hash as a method cipher. Each time that code is called, a new hash is created. And this has to be done for each letter. That is a huge waste of resource.

Using the hash, you can simply do this:

h = {"a" => "n", "b" => "o", 'c' => 'p', 'd' => 'q',
     'e' => 'r', 'f' => 's', 'g' => 't', 'h' => 'u',
     'i' => 'v', 'j' => 'w', 'k' => 'x', 'l' => 'y',
     'm' => 'z', 'n' => 'a', 'o' => 'b', 'p' => 'c',
     'q' => 'd', 'r' => 'e', 's' => 'f', 't' => 'g',
     'u' => 'h', 'v' => 'i', 'w' => 'j', 'x' => 'k',
     'y' => 'l', 'z' => 'm'}
h.default_proc = ->x{x}

"hello world".gsub(/./, h)
# => "uryyb jbeyq"

But I would rather go with this:

from = "abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz"
to = "nopqrstuvwxyzabcdefghijklm"

"hello world".tr(from, to)
# => "uryyb jbeyq"
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