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If I needed to initialize only a few select values of a C++ struct, would this be correct:

struct foo {
    foo() : a(true), b(true) {}
    bool a;
    bool b;
    bool c;
 } bar;

Am I correct to assume I would end up with one struct item called bar with elements bar.a = true, bar.b = true and an undefined bar.c?

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the bar is just a renaming, if you are using c++ you don't need to do things this way –  aaronman May 28 '13 at 0:16
5  
@aaronman no, bar is a variable. –  Luchian Grigore May 28 '13 at 0:20
3  
@aaronman I think you're confusing this with typedef struct foo {} bar;. –  greatwolf May 28 '13 at 0:21
    
So, if bar is the struct, what's foo? Is this the same as defining a foo struct and separately declaring a new variable bar as type foo? –  Ghodmode Nov 29 '13 at 4:10

3 Answers 3

up vote 12 down vote accepted

Yes. bar.a and bar.b are set to true, but bar.c is undefined. However, certain compiler will set it to false.

See a live example here: struct demo

According to C++ standard Section 8.5.12:

if no initialization is performed, an object with automatic or dynamic storage duration has indeterminate value

For primitive built-in data types (bool, char, wchar_t, short, int, long, float, double, long double), only global variables (all static storage variables) get default value of zero if they are not explicitly initialized.

If you don't really want undefined bar.c to start with, you should also initialize it like you did for bar.a and bar.b.

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Section and paragraph? –  Captain Obvlious May 28 '13 at 0:25
1  
@CaptainObvlious just updated, sorry I was distracted by other stuff and not with computer. –  taocp May 28 '13 at 0:41
    
No worries...had already upvoted ;) –  Captain Obvlious May 28 '13 at 0:44
    
@CaptainObvlious Thanks. –  taocp May 28 '13 at 0:46
    
Not only global variables. All variables with static storage duration. –  Ben Voigt May 28 '13 at 5:28

You don't even need to define a constructor

struct foo {
    bool a = true;
    bool b = true;
    bool c;
 } bar;

To clarify: these are called brace-or-equal-initializers (because you may also use brace initialization instead of equal sign). This is not only for aggregates: you can use this in normal class definitions. This was added in C++11.

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1  
This is not legal C++ code. –  jamesdlin May 28 '13 at 3:50
    
@Erik how can you initialize struct members in declaration. Not allowed. –  Gaurav May 28 '13 at 4:06
    
This type of initialisation is possible with C# I think, but definitely not with C++ or C. –  dreamlax May 28 '13 at 5:16
12  
Downvoters: Please familiarize yourselves with the C++11 updates to the Standard before lecturing people on what is or isn't legal. It actually compiles just fine. This is C++11, and C++11 is C++, until a new version is adopted. –  Ben Voigt May 28 '13 at 5:29
    
@BenVoigt Ah, C++11. My mistake. Sorry about that. –  jamesdlin May 28 '13 at 5:30

You can do it by using a constructor, like this:

struct Date
{
int day;
int month;
int year;

Date()
{
    day=0;
    month=0;
    year=0;
}
};

or like this:

struct Date
{
int day;
int month;
int year;

Date():day(0),
       month(0),
       year(0){}
};

In your case bar.c is undefined,and its value depends on the compiler (while a and b were set to true).

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1  
There is no reason to prefer the first form. You should use initialization lists. –  jamesdlin May 28 '13 at 3:51

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