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I really need the help of a Perl hacker. This looks easy but I have been thinking about it for an hour and didnt come with any solution.

Assuming we have a flat or log file like the following.:

    2013-05-27T19:01:23 [INFO] item_id:1, start at Reader.pm line 23
    2013-05-27T19:01:29 [INFO] item_id:2, pause at Reader.pm line 23
    2013-05-27T19:01:30 [INFO] item_id:1, start at Reader.pm line 23
    2013-05-27T19:01:30 [INFO] item_id:1, start at Reader.pm line 23
    2013-05-27T19:01:30 [INFO] item_id:1, start at Reader.pm line 23
    2013-05-27T19:01:30 [INFO] item_id:1, start at Reader.pm line 23
    2013-05-27T19:01:30 [INFO] item_id:3, start at Reader.pm line 23
    2013-05-27T19:01:30 [INFO] item_id:3, start at Reader.pm line 23
    2013-05-27T19:01:30 [INFO] item_id:3, start at Reader.pm line 23
    2013-05-27T19:01:30 [INFO] item_id:5, start at Reader.pm line 23
    2013-05-27T19:01:30 [INFO] item_id:5, start at Reader.pm line 23
    2013-05-27T19:01:30 [INFO] item_id:5, start at Reader.pm line 23
    2013-05-27T19:01:30 [INFO] item_id:5, start at Reader.pm line 23
    (...)

I have to make a method that finds the biggest item_id number, in this case 5 and locate it in a variable $found. Notice that we do not know a priori which is the largest number, so I cannot use grep because i would need to put the "biggest number (that is, 5 in this case)" as an input. The only input we have is the location of the file. What do you suggest?

share|improve this question
    
For information, the perl one liners and loops are the fastest at about 600ms. Looped programs are 700-800ms. max @ids is about 900ms. cut | sed | sort is 1200ms. sed | sort is the slowest by far at 3800ms. –  Schwern May 28 '13 at 21:36
    
@Schwern Thanks for the info. By the way, how would you test a task like this one? –  ado May 31 '13 at 9:49
    
use File::Temp; use Test::More; my $tmp = File::Temp->new; print $tmp $test_log_data; is max_item_id_in_log($tmp->filename), $expected_max_item_id; done_testing; –  Schwern Jun 1 '13 at 5:57

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

List::Util has a max() function which will select the largest number.

use List::Util qw(max);

my @ids;
while(my $line = <$fh>) {
    my($id) = $line =~ /item_id:(\d+)/;
    push @ids, $id;
}

print max(@ids);

For edification, max is a pretty straight forward function to implement.

sub max {
    my $max;
    for my $num (@_) {
        $max = $num if $num > $max;
    }

    return $max;
}

If you have a tremendous number of lines you can do the max calculation in the loop to avoid having to store a list.

my $max;
while(my $line = <$fh>) {
    my($id) = $line =~ /item_id:(\d+)/;
    $max = $id if $id > $max;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Why the down votes for this one? –  squiguy May 28 '13 at 1:55
    
@Schwern Thanks I like this one. The file has half a million lines so I was looking for something neat. –  ado May 28 '13 at 2:06
    
@squiguy I was wondering that myself. Using an array is a bit wasteful, but even at half a million lines it doesn't make a dent in performance or memory. An array of half a million integers is just 4 megs. max can tear through them in milliseconds. All the cost will be in reading the file. –  Schwern May 28 '13 at 21:28
    
The "tremendous number of lines" solution seems more straightforward than the List::Util solution; I'd prefer it even for small inputs. –  Keith Thompson May 28 '13 at 21:32
    
@squidguy, Q: how do I multiply two numbers? Analogue of this answer: here's a peano number module that supports multiplication. Factorial 5 consumes 100MB of RAM and takes ten minutes to run to completion on my system, so if you're dealing with crazy large numbers you might want to grudgingly do the obviously preferable thing. –  Julian Fondren May 28 '13 at 21:42

This solution is very straightforward. It expects the name of the input file as a parameter on the command line.

use strict;
use warnings;

my $found = 0;

while (<>) {
  next unless /item_id:(\d+)/;
  $found = $1 if $found < $1;
}

print "Found: $found";

output

Found: 5

Update

If all you want is the value then there is this command-line version

perl -ne "/item_id:(\d+)/ && $f<$1 and $f=$1; END{print $f}" data.txt
share|improve this answer
2  
Why is your output 0? –  squiguy May 28 '13 at 1:34
    
@squiguy: Did you give it a file name parameter like I said? –  Borodin May 28 '13 at 1:40
    
I would love to know the reason for my downvote? –  Borodin May 28 '13 at 1:42
    
I didn't down vote, I know it takes a file name for the command line. –  squiguy May 28 '13 at 1:43
    
Probably cause you said you got 0 for output when the OP requested it give 5??? Fixed that issue if that's the case. –  ikegami May 28 '13 at 1:43

Just read in every line of the log file and use regex to pick up the game ids, initialize the game id with the first one, and replace it when you get a larger id.

use strict;
use warnings;

my $location = "file.txt";
open LOGFILE, $location;

my $first_line = 1;
my $max_id;

while (<LOGFILE>) {
    if (/item_id:(\d)+/) {
        if ($first_line) {
            $first_line = 0;
            $max_id = $1;
        } else {
            $max_id = $1 if ($1 > $max_id);
        }
    }
}

my $found = $max_id;
print "$found\n";

close LOGFILE;
share|improve this answer
1  
Yep. As a one-liner, and assuming that the IDs are never all negative: perl -lne '$id = $1 if /item_id:(\d+)/ and $1 > $id; END { print $id }' thefile –  Julian Fondren May 28 '13 at 1:31
    
Yeah I love your answer. –  user1149862 May 28 '13 at 1:33
1  
If you want to check for the first line of input then use $. == 1 –  Borodin May 28 '13 at 2:10
    
Thanks that's helpful. –  user1149862 May 28 '13 at 2:13

As a Perl one-liner:

perl -lne '{$s{$1}++ if /item_id:(\d+)/} END{print ((sort keys %s)[-1])}' input

or,

perl -nle '{$m = $1 if /item_id:(\d+)/ and $1 > $m} END{print $m}' input

Because you mentioned grep, here is a way to do this using command line tools:

cut -d' ' -f3 input | sed 's/[^:]*:\([0-9]*\),/\1/' | sort -nr | head -1

or,

sed 's/.*item_id:\([0-9]*\),.*/\1/' input | sort -nr | head -1
share|improve this answer
    
This is a question about Perl –  Borodin May 28 '13 at 1:30
    
why not do the cut in sed? or the number extraction with cut (e.g. cut -d, -f1 input | cut -d: -f4 | sort ... –  ysth May 28 '13 at 1:31
    
@Borodin: $found = qx'sed...' :) –  ysth May 28 '13 at 1:32
    
@ysth: Yeah right :-/ –  Borodin May 28 '13 at 1:33
    
@Borodin, thanks for some reason I thought OP referred to grep as in the command line tool –  perreal May 28 '13 at 1:33

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