Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

This is based on the suggestion from my earlier question here:

    go bs = do
       r <- try $ parseRequest reader bs secure
       case r of
         Left ex -> do
            putStrLn "got exception"
            exceptionHandler writer ex
            go empty
         Right (request, bs') -> do
            sendResponse writer =<< app request
            go bs'

When there is no exception, the Right part runs no problem. However when an exception is thrown, the exception bubbles all the way to the top and Left isn't run. It doesn't seem to mater what kind of exception it is.

Here are the exceptions that is it supposed to catch (though it also won't catch error):

data ParseError                                                                 
    = Unexpected                                                                
    | MalformedRequestLine ByteString                                           
    | MalformedHeader      ByteString                                           
    | MissingHeader        ByteString Headers                                   
    | UnknownSIPVersion    ByteString                                           
      deriving (Typeable, Show, Eq)    

instance Exception ParseError

Here is the type of exceptionHandler:

exceptionHandler :: (ByteString -> IO ())                                         
             -> ParseError                                                    
             -> IO ()

Also this is version 7.4.1 of ghc.

Any ideas why?

share|improve this question
    
It's almost certainly because of the type of exceptionHandler, which is conveniently nowhere to be found in this snippet. Unless, of course, it's an exception caused by pure code inside of the parser that doesn't get thrown until something is forced. Either way, this question is missing a great deal of important information. –  Carl May 28 '13 at 3:27
    
Which try are you using? What exception is being missed? What exception type are you handling? Your question is far too incomplete. –  Thomas M. DuBuisson May 28 '13 at 3:29
    
Why would the type of exceptionHandler matter? It can't be used for pattern matching, can it? –  Joehillen May 28 '13 at 3:29
    
@Joehillen It matters because the return value of try (from Control.Exception, Thomas made the excellent point it could be a different try) depends on what exceptions it's catching. Since this isn't a compile error, the only thing that could determine the type of the Left case is the call to exceptionHandler. –  Carl May 28 '13 at 3:33
    
@hammar yes, that's there –  Joehillen May 28 '13 at 3:52

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

I suspect the problem is that you're using a throw which doesn't get evaluated within the scope of the try. In that case, you will get the exception after the try instead, when you try to use the result. If you can, use throwIO instead to ensure that the exception gets thrown at the correct time.

Notice the difference:

> :set -XDeriveDataTypeable
> :m + Control.Exception Data.Typeable
> data Boom = Boom deriving (Show, Typeable)
> instance Exception Boom
> try $ return (throw Boom) :: IO (Either Boom Int)
Right *** Exception: Boom
> try $ throwIO Boom :: IO (Either Boom Int)
Left Boom
share|improve this answer
    
BINGO! I have been fighting with this issue for 3 days. Thank you so much! –  Joehillen May 28 '13 at 4:15
    
alternative using evaluate without changing your code try (evaluate ... –  Gabriel Riba May 28 '13 at 9:19

Your question pains me because if you use the correct try it should work, but you have failed to provide a minimum example. Instead, I will provide a functional example and leave it to you to determine what is different in your code.

{-# LANGUAGE DeriveDataTypeable, ScopedTypeVariables #-}

I only needed ScopedTypeVariables because I didn't use an explicitly typed function.

import Control.Exception as X
import Data.ByteString as B
import Data.Typeable
import Data.Data

Notice I am using the Control.Exception module, and the try function from there. I suspect your try comes from elsewhere.

data ParseError
    = Unexpected
    | MalformedRequestLine ByteString
    | MalformedHeader      ByteString
    | MissingHeader        ByteString ()
    | UnknownSIPVersion    ByteString
      deriving (Typeable, Show, Eq)

instance Exception ParseError

parseRequest :: IO Int
parseRequest = throw Unexpected

For testing, my parseResult just throws something.

exceptionHandler :: (ByteString -> IO ())
                 -> ParseError
                 -> IO ()
exceptionHandler f p = print p

main = do
  r <- X.try parseRequest
  case r of
    Right i -> print i
    Left (e :: ParseError) -> print ("Caught",e)

And the main routine is pretty boring - just a summary of the important parts of your routine. It runs fine:

$ ghc so.hs
[1 of 1] Compiling Main             ( so.hs, so.o )
Linking so ...
$ ./so
("Caught",Unexpected)

If you modify the exception to a different type you'll see the exception is not caught:

parseRequest :: IO Int
parseRequest = error "This is a different type, and won't be caught by 'ParseError' handlers."

With a result of:

$ ./so
so: This is a different type, thus not caught by 'ParseError' handlers.

If you wish to catch ALL exceptions then you need a type that suffices for that task.

share|improve this answer
    
"Your question pains me because if you use the correct try it should work, but you have failed to provide a minimum example." Your snark is unnecessary and unhelpful. If it's so painful for you, why bother answering? –  Joehillen May 28 '13 at 4:17
1  
Well, I do like to help but one of the most frustrating things on SO (to me) is incomplete or under-specified questions. –  Thomas M. DuBuisson May 28 '13 at 4:19
3  
@Joehillen: To be fair, if you had included the code where the exception was thrown, we would have been able to spot the problem easily without guessing. Small and complete examples make things easier for everyone. –  hammar May 28 '13 at 4:19

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.