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I have a list of 46 items. Each has a number associated with it. I want to pair these items up in a set of 23 pairs. I want to evaluate a function over each set. How do I generate such a set?

I can use the combinations function from itertools to produce all the 2-ples but I don't see how to generate all the sets of 23 pairs.

How do I do this or is there sample code I can reference?

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1  
please show example input –  jamylak May 28 '13 at 3:52
    
Does the order matter within the pairs? –  Vaughn Cato May 28 '13 at 4:00
    
Are you saying you want all possible sets of 23 items, where each item is a pair of items from the original set of 46? There are 1035 pairs in the original set. That means the number of sets of 23 of those pairs is 1035 choose 23, which is approximately 50 quattuordecillion --- that is, 5 followed by 46 zeroes. You are unlikely to be able to do anything useful with this immense number of combinations. –  BrenBarn May 28 '13 at 4:33

2 Answers 2

>>> L=range(46)
>>> def f(x, y):       #for example
...     return x * y
... 
>>> [f(x, y) for x, y in zip(*[iter(L)] * 2)]
[0, 6, 20, 42, 72, 110, 156, 210, 272, 342, 420, 506, 600, 702, 812, 930, 1056, 1190, 1332, 1482, 1640, 1806, 1980]

Edit:

For the powerset of the pairs, we start by creating the pairs the same way. For Python3 use range in place of xrange

S = zip(*[iter(L)] * 2) # set of 23 pairs
[{j for i, j in enumerate(S) if (1<<i)&k} for k in xrange(1<<len(S))]

This will be quite a big list, you may want to use a generator expression

for item in ({j for i, j in enumerate(S) if (1<<i)&k} for k in xrange(1<<len(S))):
    func(item)
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2  
For anyone wondering how zip(*[iter(L)] * 2) works: stackoverflow.com/questions/2233204/… and yes it is an accepted Python idiom (don't complain it's not pythonic): docs.python.org/2/library/functions.html#zip –  jamylak May 28 '13 at 3:58
2  
I don't think this is what he's looking for, though, if he wants all possible sets of 23 pairs. –  Cairnarvon May 28 '13 at 3:58
    
@Cairnarvon, hmm you mean the powerset of the 23 pairs? Maybe. An example would have helped though –  gnibbler May 28 '13 at 4:04
2  
@Patashu, that's nice. It obviously wasn't clear to me –  gnibbler May 28 '13 at 4:11
1  
"This will be quite a big list" is an understatement. –  BrenBarn May 28 '13 at 4:33

First, the natural way to get all the pairs from a list is:

>>> N = 10
>>> input_list = range(N)
>>>  [(a,b) for a, b in zip(input_list[::2], input_list[1::2])]
[(0, 1), (2, 3), (4, 5), (6, 7), (8, 9)]

If you want to generate all such pairs, I'd do something like (this is what I call Case 1 below):

>>> set_of_all_pairs = set()
>>> input_list = range(N)
>>> import itertools
>>> for perm in itertools.permutations(input_list):
        pairs = tuple([(a,b) for a, b in zip(perm[::2], perm[1::2])])
        set_of_all_pairs.add(pairs)

Granted this as is will differentiate order in pair (e.g., (1,4) is different than (4,1)) as well as consider the order of pairs meaningful. So if you sort the pairs and the set of pairs before adding to the set:

>>> set_of_all_pairs = set()
>>> input_list = range(N)
>>> import itertools
>>> for perm in itertools.permutations(input_list):
        pairs = sorted([tuple(sorted((a,b))) for a, b in zip(perm[::2], perm[1::2])])
        set_of_all_pairs.add(tuple(pairs))

This is not an efficient algorithm (what I call Case 3 below), but for small values of N it will work.

For N=6, using the sorted method.

set([((0, 4), (1, 3), (2, 5)),
     ((0, 4), (1, 5), (2, 3)),
     ((0, 1), (2, 3), (4, 5)),
     ((0, 3), (1, 5), (2, 4)),
     ((0, 2), (1, 5), (3, 4)),
     ((0, 4), (1, 2), (3, 5)),
     ((0, 3), (1, 4), (2, 5)),
     ((0, 1), (2, 4), (3, 5)),
     ((0, 5), (1, 4), (2, 3)),
     ((0, 5), (1, 2), (3, 4)),
     ((0, 2), (1, 3), (4, 5)),
     ((0, 3), (1, 2), (4, 5)),
     ((0, 2), (1, 4), (3, 5)),
     ((0, 1), (2, 5), (3, 4)),
     ((0, 5), (1, 3), (2, 4))])

Note the solution space grows exponentially fast; (e.g., for N=6 its 15; N=8 its 105; N=10, its 945, for N=46 will be 25373791335626257947657609375 ~ 2.5 x 1028).

EDIT: People criticized the O(N!), but the desired solution grows as O(N!)

The question asks to break a list of N elements (assuming most general case of all elements being distinct) into a set of (N/2) pairs, and not only do this once, but generate all sets of these pairings. This answer is the only one that does so. Yes, it's exponentially slow, and completely infeasible for N=46. That's why I used N=10.

There are three reasonable interpretations of the problem:

Case 1: Ordering matters both inside a pair in the tuple (e.g., function arguments are not symmetric) and in the order of the pairs in a set of pairs also matters, then we will have N! ways of pairing up the numbers in our answer. Meaning in this case both the pair (0,1) and (1,0) are consider distinct, as well as for the N=4 case we consider the pairings {(0,1), (2,3)} distinct from {(2,3),(0,1)}.

Case 2: Ordering matters in a pair, but order is irrelevant in a set of pairings. This means we consider (0,1) and (1,0) as distinct pairs, but consider (for the N=4 case) that the set {(0,1),(2,3)} is identical to the set {(2,3), (0,1)} and do not need to consider both. In this case we will have N!/(N/2)! pairings, as any given set has (N/2)! different orderings. (I didn't explicitly give this above; but just stop sorting the tuple).

Case 3: Ordering is irrelevant both within a pair and within a set of pairings. This means we consider (0,1) and (1,0) as the same pair (function arguments are symmetric), so we will have N!/( (N/2)! & 2^(N/2) ) sets of pairs (factorial(N)/(factorial(N/2)*2**(N/2))). Each of the (N/2) pairs in each combination will have two internal orderings that contribute.

So depending on how the problem is phrased we should have:

      Case 1   |   Case 2    |  Case 3
----------------------------------------------
 N        N!   |   N!/(N/2)! |  N!/((N/2)! 2^(N/2))
 6       720   |     120     |     15 
 8     40320   |    1680     |    105
10   3628800   |   30240     |    945
46  5.5x10^57  | 2.1x10^35   |  2x10^28

Note, my algorithm will go through all permutations, and hence will actually run slower for Case 3 (due to sorting) than Case 1, even though a better algorithm for Case 3 could be much faster. However, my answer is still optimal in asymptotic notation as even case 3 is factorial in its asymptotic running time, and completely infeasible to solve for N~46. Granted if you had to do a problem-size at the limit of feasibility (N~16) for Case 3 (e.g., need to generate 518918400.0 pairings), this solution of iterating through all N! permutations, sorting, and throwing out duplicates is sub-optimal.

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4  
Note that that's 42! iterations to go through. At a trillion iterations per second, that will take 44.5 octillion millennia to complete. You know, in case anyone's in a hurry. –  Cairnarvon May 28 '13 at 4:12
    
OK, as the OP, I realize I'm going to have to reformulate how I find a practical solution. Thanks for pointing out just how big this is. –  user1625344 May 28 '13 at 14:49
    
@Cairnarvon - yes it has a N! running time. But as my edit shows, for any reasonable interpretation of the original problem, the number of expected solutions grows as O(N!) and solving for N=46 is completely infeasible. At least this solution, works for very small values; unlike gnibblers which doesn't answer the question. –  dr jimbob May 28 '13 at 15:44

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