Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am currently digging into the basics of php class / constructor. I understand how a constructor works but not why I should use it. For example when I have a constructor like this:

function __construct($arg1, $arg2){
    $this->name  = $arg1;
    $this->speed = $arg2;
}

Why should I use __constructor and not a simple callback like:

function foo($arg1,$arg2){

    $this->name  = $arg1;
    $this->speed = $arg2;
}

Thank you

share|improve this question
    
Because the constructor initiates the class object and is called by default when a new object is created of the class –  Manish Jangir May 28 '13 at 5:08
    
$class=new cls('1','2') is faster than $class=new cls(); $class->foo('1','2'). –  Dave Chen May 28 '13 at 5:10
    
So it is just a performance thing? bc by doing this I can achieve the same result –  Christoph Ha May 28 '13 at 5:11

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

1 Doing

$obj = new Class($var1, $var2);

And

$obj = new Class($var1, $var2);
$obj->foo($var1, $var2);

Has the same end result

2 By forcing values to be passed on the constructor, class can define Mandatory values it should have in order to construct a class. As in the later case, one can ignore foo.

3 Having a method to initialize means, one ends up having different method names, foo, init etc, constructor avoids this

share|improve this answer

The constructor is always called on object instantiation and is a known pattern.

Your second example isn't (if it's intended to perform a similar initialisation role as the constructor).

share|improve this answer
<?php 
class abc {
    function __construct($arg1, $arg2){
        echo $arg1.' '.arg2;
    }
}
$obj = new abc('manish','jangir');
?>

It will print "manish jangir" automatically when the object is created

share|improve this answer

The main purpose is to keep your code clean. With placing your initialization in the constructor you can kan be sure the variable to be used in the other function will be in valid state for example :

class Foo{
    private $number;

    public function setNumber($number) {
        $this->number = $number;
    }

    public function getNumber() {
        if ($this->number=== null) {
            throw new RuntimeException("The Number is Null !");
        }
        return number;
    }
}

this is the class with constructor

class Foo{
    private $number;

    public function __construct($number) {
        $this->number = $number;
    }

    public function getNumber() {
        if ($this->number=== null) {
            throw new RuntimeException("The Number is Null !");
        }
        return number;
    }
}

with constructor you can be sure the number will be initialized. I hope my answer is clear enough but if you have another question about my answer feel free to ask in the comment :)

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.