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say I have a list of dictionaries:

foo = [
      {'host': 'localhost', 'db_name': 'test', 'table': 'partners'},
      {'host': 'localhost', 'db_name': 'test', 'table': 'users'},
      {'host': 'localhost', 'db_name': 'test', 'table': 'sales'},
      {'host': 'localhost', 'db_name': 'new', 'table': 'partners'},
      {'host': 'localhost', 'db_name': 'new', 'table': 'users'},
      {'host': 'localhost', 'db_name': 'new', 'table': 'sales'},
]

How can I split this list into separate lists (or into a list of lists) where 'host' and 'db_name' are the same? For example:

list1 = [
        {'host': 'localhost', 'db_name': 'test', 'table': 'partners'},
        {'host': 'localhost', 'db_name': 'test', 'table': 'users'},
        {'host': 'localhost', 'db_name': 'test', 'table': 'sales'},
]

list2 = [
        {'host': 'localhost', 'db_name': 'new', 'table': 'partners'},
        {'host': 'localhost', 'db_name': 'new', 'table': 'users'},
        {'host': 'localhost', 'db_name': 'new', 'table': 'sales'},
]
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3 Answers 3

up vote 9 down vote accepted
>>> from collections import defaultdict
>>> dd = defaultdict(list)
>>> foo = [
      {'host': 'localhost', 'db_name': 'test', 'table': 'partners'},
      {'host': 'localhost', 'db_name': 'test', 'table': 'users'},
      {'host': 'localhost', 'db_name': 'test', 'table': 'sales'},
      {'host': 'localhost', 'db_name': 'new', 'table': 'partners'},
      {'host': 'localhost', 'db_name': 'new', 'table': 'users'},
      {'host': 'localhost', 'db_name': 'new', 'table': 'sales'},
]
>>> for d in foo:
        dd[(d['host'], d['db_name'])].append(d)

The lists of lists is the dictionary's values

>>> dd.values()
[[{'table': 'partners', 'host': 'localhost', 'db_name': 'new'}, {'table': 'users', 'host': 'localhost', 'db_name': 'new'}, {'table': 'sales', 'host': 'localhost', 'db_name': 'new'}], [{'table': 'partners', 'host': 'localhost', 'db_name': 'test'}, {'table': 'users', 'host': 'localhost', 'db_name': 'test'}, {'table': 'sales', 'host': 'localhost', 'db_name': 'test'}]]
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1  
Takes into account host+db name requirement. –  Burhan Khalid May 28 '13 at 6:08
    
+1 I missed the fact that both host and db_name are required. –  Ashwini Chaudhary May 28 '13 at 6:10
    
Thank you for this great solution. –  atman May 28 '13 at 8:36

This is a perfect use case for the groupby function from itertools:

from itertools import groupby

foo.sort(key = lambda x: (x['db_name'], x['host']))
it = groupby(foo, key = lambda x: (x['db_name'], x['host']) )

groups = []
keys = []
for k, g in it:
    groups.append(list(g))
    keys.append(k)

print groups
## >>>
##[
##    [{'table': 'partners', 'host': 'localhost', 'db_name': 'test'},
##     {'table': 'users', 'host': 'localhost', 'db_name': 'test'},
##     {'table': 'sales', 'host': 'localhost', 'db_name': 'test'}],
##    [{'table': 'partners', 'host': 'localhost', 'db_name': 'new'},
##     {'table': 'users', 'host': 'localhost', 'db_name': 'new'},
##     {'table': 'sales', 'host': 'localhost', 'db_name': 'new'}]
##]

##or make a dict
d = dict(zip(keys, groups))
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Only if you sort before grouping (or maybe they are guaranteed to be sorted?). Otherwise defaultdict is a better fit here –  John La Rooy May 28 '13 at 6:43
    
@qwwqwwq it isn't perfect since the data is not already sorted so this is O(n log n) as opposed to O(n) for defaultdict –  jamylak May 28 '13 at 6:47
    
yes that is true, I added the sorting step above, I was assuming sorted but it is not explicitly stated. Even with sorting I prefer this because for the use case I'm imagining we could altogether avoid making a new data structure, working elegantly on the current data structure as we go through the groupby iterable –  qwwqwwq May 28 '13 at 6:49
    
Thank you for your input. –  atman May 28 '13 at 8:36
    
@qwwqwwq A nicer way of doing this would be through operator.itemgetter eg. foo.sort(key=itemgetter('db_name', 'host')) –  jamylak May 28 '13 at 9:48

You can do this:

sp={}
for d in foo:
    sp.setdefault((d['host'],d['db_name']),[]).append(d)

Then print it:

for l in sp.values():
    for d in l:
        print d
    print     


{'table': 'partners', 'host': 'localhost', 'db_name': 'new'}
{'table': 'users', 'host': 'localhost', 'db_name': 'new'}
{'table': 'sales', 'host': 'localhost', 'db_name': 'new'}

{'table': 'partners', 'host': 'localhost', 'db_name': 'test'}
{'table': 'users', 'host': 'localhost', 'db_name': 'test'}
{'table': 'sales', 'host': 'localhost', 'db_name': 'test'}
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