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I am Using Oracle 10g. I am Adding new column deptId to my UserList Table where I use deptId column as Foreign key which references other table Column Departments.DepartmentId

Is there Difference between adding foreign key as constraint and First Query

Query1

ALTER TABLE UserList
ADD FOREIGN KEY (DeptId)
REFERENCES Departments(DepartmentId)    

Query2

ALTER TABLE UserList
ADD CONSTRAINT  fk_DeptId FOREIGN KEY (DeptId)
REFERENCES Departments(DepartmentId)
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Your question implies that you're adding a column -- you're actually just adding a constraint here, so you might like to edit that. –  David Aldridge May 28 '13 at 7:15

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

There is no difference except in your use of the optional "CONSTRAINT" and constraint name clause.

There are two kinds of constraint definition: inline and out of line. The former operates on a column as part of the column definition, and hence does not need to name the DeptID column. The latter is part of the table definition and therefore does.

Both of your examples are out of line constraints, but you have not named the constraint in the former case, which is a bad practice:

http://docs.oracle.com/cd/E18283_01/server.112/e17118/clauses002.htm#g1053592

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The second syntax allows you to name your constraint. The first doesn't.

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Thanks for Reply. So you are telling adding Foreign key is like adding Unnamed Constraint –  Java Beginner May 28 '13 at 6:58
    
Yes, it's the same syntax, just without the contraint name. See the documentation. –  Eric Citaire May 28 '13 at 7:02
    
Well, it's not unnamed, it's just going to get system-generated name, like, SYS_C132432 –  be here now May 28 '13 at 7:05

ALTER TABLE [dbo].[UserList]  WITH NOCHECK ADD  CONSTRAINT [fk_DeptId] FOREIGN KEY([DeptId])
REFERENCES [dbo].[Departments] ([DepartmentId])

No, there is no difference in both of your queries.But you to name the foreign key constraints names . You can use the above query.

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