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HTML

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JQUERY

$(document).ready(function(){
  var b = '<input type="text" name="fullname"><br>'+
          '<input type="text" name="email">';
  $('a').click(function(){
    $("a ~ input, a ~ br").remove();
    $("body").append(b);
  });
  $('input').on({
    focus: function(){
      $(this).css("background","#ccc");
    },
    blur: function(){
      $(this).css("background","#fff");
    }
  });
});

.on() event is not working while i generated input dynamically.

share|improve this question
1  
have a look into event delegation api.jquery.com/delegate –  Marian Theisen May 28 '13 at 6:57
1  
There are many, many questions and even the jQuery API page demonstrating how to use .on() event delegation. But I wonder, why don't you just use a :focus CSS pseudo-class? –  Fabrício Matté May 28 '13 at 6:58
    
dynamically generated elements require the additional selector argument to .on(). –  Alnitak May 28 '13 at 7:00
    
you must put the $('input').on to inside the $("a).click event. –  JamesN May 28 '13 at 7:00

5 Answers 5

That is not the way to use .on(). It should be like this:

$('body').on('focus', 'input', function(){
    $(this).css("background","#ccc");
});

You must bind the event on an element already on page when it loads..

You can learn more here.

share|improve this answer
    
but i also want to run the blur function. –  Pulkit Jain May 28 '13 at 7:11
    
Since you blur and focus have different function, you can bind another on() but with blur instead of focus with the same structure.. :) –  Nix R. Eyes May 28 '13 at 7:15

Use

$(document).on("focus", "input",  function(){
      $(this).css("background","#ccc");
});
... analog for blur event

In the documentation we find the on() function:

.on( events [, selector ] [, data ], handler(eventObject) )

So we will detect focus on all inputs from document with these parameters:

  • events: "focus"
  • selector: "input"

Direct and delegated events

When a selector is provided, the event handler is referred to as delegated. The handler is not called when the event occurs directly on the bound element, but only for descendants (inner elements) that match the selector. jQuery bubbles the event from the event target up to the element where the handler is attached (i.e., innermost to outermost element) and runs the handler for any elements along that path matching the selector.

Event handlers are bound only to the currently selected elements; they must exist on the page at the time your code makes the call to .on(). To ensure the elements are present and can be selected, perform event binding inside a document ready handler for elements that are in the HTML markup on the page.

If new HTML is being injected into the page, select the elements and attach event handlers after the new HTML is placed into the page. Or, use delegated events to attach an event handler, as described next.

[read more on the documentation page]

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$('body').on( eventName, selector, function(){} );

Check on() function

For Example

$("input").on("blur", function(){
   $(this).css("background","#fff");
});
share|improve this answer

Working jsFiddle Demo

You are using .on() method in a wrong way. The selector must be static in page (and not dynamically created), for example the body is a good case:

$('body')
    .on('focus', 'input', function () {
        $(this).css("background","#ccc");
    })
    .on('blur', 'input', function () {
        $(this).css("background","#fff");
    });

References:

  • .on() - jQuery API Documentation
share|improve this answer
    
working fine.....Thanks :) –  Pulkit Jain May 28 '13 at 8:31

Try this (not tested):

$(document).ready(function(){
  var b = $('<input type="text" name="fullname"><br>'+
          '<input type="text" name="email">');
  b.find('input').focus(
    function(){
      $(this).css("background","#ccc");
    }).
    blur(function(){
      $(this).css("background","#fff");
    })
  );

  $('a').click(function(){
    $("a ~ input, a ~ br").remove();
    $("body").append(b);
  });
});

The point is you add the handler to b before inserting it into the body. This avoids adding handlers to all other already inserted input elements, and makes sure you're adding the handler only once. I have not tested it, but it should work.

Edit: Also I've changed on() to using focus() and blur(), since it looks to me they were used wrong. But I'm not sure since I never use the on() method and don't know every way to use it.

share|improve this answer
    
You should use .on - eventually I hope the jQuery team will deprecate all of the event-specific binding functions. The whole point of this question is to find the right way of using .on, so if you don't know it yourself, you're not helping. –  Alnitak May 28 '13 at 8:52
    
There's more to get this working than just getting the .on() syntax right. Getting the order right, avoiding adding multiple handles, avoiding handles to wrong elements etc. Just adding handles to every input might work on a test case, but when the code is part of a larger site it will easily break if not done right from the beginning. –  Atle May 28 '13 at 12:57

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