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Hello everyone I have following code

POINT = function () {
    that = {};
    that.x = 0; that.y = 0;

    that.setPoint = function (x, y) {
        that.x = x;
        that.y = y;
    };

    that.toString = function () {
        return that.x + ',' + that.y + ' ';
    };    

    return that;
};

PEN = function () {
    var that = {};
    var points = [];
    var buffer_size = 5, head = -1, length = 0;

    // Init buffer
    for (var i = 0; i < buffer_size; i++) {
        points.push(POINT());
    }

    that.addPoint = function (x, y) {
        head = (head + 1) % buffer_size;
        points[head].setPoint(x, y);
        if (length < buffer_size) {length++;}
    };

    that.toString = function (path) {
        var d = '';
        for (var i = 0; i < length; i++) {
            var index = (head - i) < 0 ? buffer_size + (head - i) : (head - i);
            d += points[index].toString();
        }
        return d;
    };

    return that;
};

// Initialization
var i = 0, pen = PEN();

for (var i = 0; i < 10; i++) {
    pen.addPoint(i + 1, i + 1);
}

alert(pen.toString()); // RESULT 10,10 10,10 10,10 10,10 10,10

The points array is filled with correct pen objects, but the function setPoint always points to the last pen object in the points array.

NOTE: I want to have x and y coordinate directly accessible, thus i am not declaring x and y as a "local" variables using var.

The fiddle with example is found here: http://jsfiddle.net/DNVjy/2/

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3  
that in POINT is global, add var that = {};. –  Yoshi May 28 '13 at 7:01
    
BTW, why emulate a ring buffer, when you could just do points.shift() to remove the 0th element? –  Alnitak May 28 '13 at 7:11
    
@Alnitak I need the ring buffer for code speed purposes. As I understood the points.shift() function would remove point from points array, thus there is potential problem with memory allocation when lot of points will be added periodically. –  Ondřej Severa May 28 '13 at 7:48
    
@OndřejSevera I'm not aware of any particular risks with memory allocation. I suspect the overhead of calculating the current ring buffer offset might be more than calling .shift() each time the buffer fills up. –  Alnitak May 28 '13 at 8:15
    
@Alnitak So if I understand it well, for me it is better to use Array.push() and Array.shift() if array exceeds the buffer capacity? I thought that these operations will have overhead in memory management. –  Ondřej Severa May 28 '13 at 9:10

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Your that in POINT shouldn't be global! You're overwriting the same global variable every time you create one, so they all refer to the same pair of values.

FWIW, why not use JS objects the way they were intended?

function POINT() {
    if (this instanceof POINT) {
        this.x = 0; this.y = 0;
    } else {
        return new POINT();   // allow creation without "new"
    }
};

POINT.prototype.setPoint = function (x, y) {
    this.x = x;
    this.y = y;
};

POINT.prototype.toString = function () {
     return this.x + ',' + this.y + ' ';
};    

The module pattern you're using is sub-optimal for many purposes:

  • each instance gets its own copy of the methods, instead of sharing them
  • the objects returned have no specific "type"
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1  
I think it's crockford's constructor pattern. If it is, new is not required. –  Yoshi May 28 '13 at 7:15
    
@Yoshi yes, I recall seeing it in Yahoo's code now. I don't like it. It's OK for some object types, but for objects that are instantiated lots of times its wasteful because every instance gets its own copy of the methods on the object. –  Alnitak May 28 '13 at 7:17
    
You're right of course. Didn't want to comment on whether to use it or not. Just that it might be, that the OP is using it, and if so, it's in someway ok to not use this and new (like every answer is suggesting). –  Yoshi May 28 '13 at 7:24
    
Thank you for such a fast response, @Yoshi is right, i am using Crockford's pattern. I gives me all benefits from prototypal inheritance. I only make rookie mistake, that I didn't use var in front of that :( –  Ondřej Severa May 28 '13 at 7:36

You should put your vars onto a var :-)

Right now you are defining the functions and the local 'that' on the window object. There is no need for 'that' as the code is now.

Try this:

function POINT() {

    this.x = 0; this.y = 0;

    this.setPoint = function (x, y) {
        this.x = x;
        this.y = y;
    };

    this.toString = function () {
        return this.x + ',' + this.y + ' ';
    };    

    return this;
};

function PEN() {
    var points = [];
    var buffer_size = 5, head = -1, length = 0;

    // Init buffer
    for (var i = 0; i < buffer_size; i++) {
        points.push(new POINT());
    }

    this.addPoint = function (x, y) {
        head = (head + 1) % buffer_size;
        points[head].setPoint(x, y);
        if (length < buffer_size) {length++;}
    };

    this.toString = function (path) {
        var d = '';
        for (var i = 0; i < length; i++) {
            var index = (head - i) < 0 ? buffer_size + (head - i) : (head - i);
            d += points[index].toString();
        }
        return d;
    };

    return this;
};

You now declare a pen like this:

var pen = new PEN();

(also notice new POINT() keyword inside the PEN "class").

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1  
without new this code will not work. –  Alnitak May 28 '13 at 7:05

Changing that in POINT to local variable (place var in front of it) changes the output to:
10,10 9,9 8,8 7,7 6,6

Hopefully this is what you've been expecting. Updated fiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/DNVjy/3/

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