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Looking for help in doing this:

I have a directory full of text files that are named with a numerical ID. Each text file contains the body of a news article. Some news articles are segregated in different parts, so they are in different text files.

The names are such

1001_1.txt, 1001_2.txt   (These files contain two different part of the same article)
1002_1.txt, 
1003_1.txt, 
1004_1.txt, 1004_2.txt, 1004_3.txt, 1004_4.txt (these files contain four different parts of the same article, the parts will go up to a maximum of 4 only).

and so forth and so on.

Basically, I need a script (PHP, Perl, RUBY or otherwise) that would simply put the name of the text file (before the underscore) in a column, and the content of the text file in another column, and if there is any number after the underscore, to put that in one column as well.

So you would have a table structure looking like this:

    1001 | 1 | content of the text file
    1001 | 2 | content of the text file
    1002 | 1 | content of the text file
    1003 | 1 | content of the text file

Any help on how I can accomplish this would be appreciated.

There are about 7000 text files that need to be read and imported in a table for future usage in a database.

It would be even better if the _1 and _2 files content could be segregated in different colums, eg:

    1001 | 1 | content | 2 | content | 3 | content | 4 | content
    1002 | 1 | content
    1003 | 1 | content

(Like I said, the file names go maximum up to _4 so you could have 1001_1, 1001_2, 1001_3, 1001_4.txt or only 1002_1 and 1003_1.txt)

share|improve this question
    
how you want to parse the output, the format seems stange to me there is no newline ? –  RageZ Nov 5 '09 at 5:48
1  
@mobrule I think so! –  RageZ Nov 5 '09 at 5:50
3  
also Amit would be nice if you let us know what you have tried we are not here to do your job ... –  RageZ Nov 5 '09 at 5:51
    
I plead not guilty to misrepresenting the OP's intentions. Original format of post is here: stackoverflow.com/revisions/… –  mob Nov 5 '09 at 6:00
    
I wonder how much time does one spends answering a questions here? The code below atleast takes 10 minutes to write. So, are people spending 10 minutes to answer a question? –  mansu Nov 5 '09 at 17:18

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This is fairly straightforward with File::Find and File::Slurp:

#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict;
use warnings;

use File::Find;
use File::Slurp;

die "Need somewhere to start\n" unless @ARGV;

my %files;
find(\&wanted, @ARGV);

for my $name (sort keys %files) {
    my $file = $files{$name};
    print join( ' | ', $name,
        map { exists $file->{$_} ? ($_, $file->{$_}) : () } 1 .. 4
    ), "\n";
}

sub wanted {
    my $file = $File::Find::name;
    return unless -f $file;
    return unless $file =~ /([0-9]{4})_([1-4])\.txt$/;
    # I do not know what you want to do with newlines
    $files{$1}->{$2} = join('\n', map { chomp; $_ } read_file $file);
    return;
}

Output:

1001 | 1 | lsdkjv\nsdfljk\nsdklfjlksjadf\nlsdjflkjdsf | 3 | sadlfkjldskfj
1002 | 1 | ldskfjsdlfjkl
share|improve this answer
    
works great, thank you! I installed the two modules, though it seems File::Find comes prebuilt with perl 5.10. Gave me exactly what I needed. –  Amit Malhotra Nov 6 '09 at 21:05
use strict;
use warnings;
my %content;

while (<>){
    s/\s+/ /g;
    my ($f, $n) = $ARGV =~ /(\d+)_(\d)\.txt$/;
    $content{$f}{$n} .= $_;
}

for my $f (sort keys %content){
    print join('|',
        $f,
        map { $_ => $content{$f}{$_} } sort keys %{$content{$f}},
    ), "\n";
}
share|improve this answer

Probably not optimal, but could be your starting point (over commented on purpose):

#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict;
use warnings;

# results hash
my %res = ();

# foreach .txt files
for (glob '*.txt') {
    s/\.txt$//; # replace suffix .txt by nothing
    my $t = ''; # buffer for the file contents
    my($f, $n) = split '_'; # cut the file name ex. 1001_1 => 1001 and 1

    # read the file contents
    {
        local $/; # slurp mode
        open(my $F, $_ . '.txt') || die $!; # open the txt file
        $t = <$F>; # get contents
        close($F); # close the text file
    }

    # transform \r, \n and \t into one space
    $t =~ s/[\r\n\t]/ /g;
    # appends for example 1001 | 2 | contents of 1001_2.txt to the results hash
    $res{$f} .= "$f | $n | $t | ";
}

# print the results
for (sort { $a <=> $b } keys %res) {
    # remove the trailing ' | '
    $res{$_} =~ s/\s\|\s$//;
    # print
    print $res{$_} . "\n";
}

# happy ending
exit 0;
share|improve this answer
    
awesome. Thank you for "Over-commenting", helped a lot in understanding what was going on as I really have no experience with Perl. This in turns help in customizing the script as well. –  Amit Malhotra Nov 6 '09 at 21:09
    
That was the goal :) –  RC. Nov 6 '09 at 21:47

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