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Here's a heap node that has an extra functionality; "load-balancing" based on modulo 2:

#! /usr/bin/env python
class Lifo:
  def __init__(self):
    # repr using tuple
    self.lifo = ()
  def push(self, data):
    # pack data using tuple
    self.lifo = (data, self.lifo)
  def pop(self): 
    # unpack data using tuple
    # raise ValueError when empty
    data, self.lifo = self.lifo
    return data
  def __len__(self):
    return len(self.lifo)
  def __repr__(self):
    return str(self.lifo)


class HeapNode:
  def __init__(self, value, left=None, right=None):
    self.data = value
    self.left = left
    self.right = right

  def __repr__(self):
    if self.left is None and self.right is None:
        return '(%s)'%(self.data)
    repr_left = '*' if self.left is None else repr(self.left)
    repr_right = '*' if self.right is None else repr(self.right)
    return '(%s L%s R%s)'%(self.data, repr_left, repr_right)

  def add(self,data,count):
    # do traversal with stack
    lifo = Lifo()
    lifo.push(self)
    print 'push\'d self is %s, lifo is %s'%(self,lifo)
    while len(lifo) > 0 :
        # self's modified here
        self = lifo.pop()
        print 'popp\'d self is %s, lifo is %s'%(self,lifo)
        if count % 2 == 0 :
            if self.right is None:
                self.right = HeapNode(data)
            else:
                lifo.push(self.right)
        else:
            if self.left is None:
                self.left = HeapNode(data)
            else:
                lifo.push(self.left)
    print 'returning self is %s'%(self,)
    return self

if __name__ == '__main__':
    heap = HeapNode(11)
    heap.add(7,0).add(4,1).add(10,2)

output:

push'd self is (11), lifo is ((11), ())
popp'd self is (11), lifo is ()
returning self is (11 L* R(7))
heap [(11 L* R(7))]
push'd self is (11 L* R(7)), lifo is ((11 L* R(7)), ())
popp'd self is (11 L* R(7)), lifo is ()
returning self is (11 L(4) R(7))
heap [(11 L(4) R(7))]
push'd self is (11 L(4) R(7)), lifo is ((11 L(4) R(7)), ())
popp'd self is (11 L(4) R(7)), lifo is ()
popp'd self is (7), lifo is ()
returning self is (7 L* R(10))
heap [(11 L(4) R(7 L* R(10)))] 

How did the above happen, i.e self (within add function) is (7 L* R(10) but heap is referenced to (11 L(4) R(7 L* R(10)))?

I understand that in main if it were: heap = heap.add_stack(10,2) then, returning value is heap.

But what I can't understand is what is adding the elements 11 L(4) to (7 L* R(10)), is it some reference and value passing that's causing this?

Can someone please explain this clearly?

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migrated from programmers.stackexchange.com May 28 '13 at 7:49

This question came from our site for professional programmers interested in conceptual questions about software development.

    
Lifo.__len__ always returns either 2 or 0, which is likely unintended. –  user4815162342 May 28 '13 at 8:05
    
This code doesn't make much sense. The lifo stack never has more than one element on it at a time, so it could be replaced by a simple variable. Reassigning the self variable in the add method is very bad code style, even though it is legal in Python (it makes the return self call not do what you'd usually expect). I don't understand what the purpose of the count parameter for add is supposed to do (an even count means traverse right, odd count means traverse left?). Did you write this code (and you're trying to fix a bug), or are you trying to understand somebody else's code? –  Blckknght May 28 '13 at 8:43
    
@Blckknght lifo is used to traverse the "heapnode"(or a tree). count is used to go left/right given a list.it's my code alright(lifo algo borrowed), and the irony is it works exactly like i want it to. but i don't understand why! –  cogitate May 28 '13 at 17:27

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Your add method seems to be equivalent to this recursive version:

def add(self, data, count):
    if count % 2:
        if self.right is None:
            self.right = HeapNode(data)
            return self # note, returning the node before the new leaf
        else:
            return self.right.add(data, count) # recurse
    else:
        if self.left is None:
            self.left = HeapNode(data)
            return self
        else:
            return self.left.add(data, count) # recurse

Since that is "tail-recursive", it can be easily transformed into an ierative version, which looks a lot like what you already have. Note though that no stack is needed, since there's only one current value at any given time (you were never calling push twice without a pop in between):

def add(self, data, count):
    current = self # lets use a different variable name rather than rewriting self
    while True: # loop until broken by a return
        if count % 2:
            if current.right is None:
                current.right = HeapNode(data)
                return current
            else:
                current = current.right
        else:
            if current.left is None:
                current.left = HeapNode(data)
                return current
            else:
                current = current.left

I've avoided your code's pitfall of rebinding the self variable name, which can be very confusing. It's a much better idea to keep self as the object the method was called on, and using a different name for the object we're currently handling.

I suspect that there's a lurking bug in this implementation, and that you want to be modifying count on each recursive step (perhaps dividing by two?), but without a better understanding of what your code is supposed to be doing I can't really know for sure.

The thing I think you're getting confused by is how the return values interact with chained calls. The returned value is always going to be the last non-leaf node that was reached. So if you call node.add(a, b) followed by a separate call to node.add(c, d), you may get a different result than if you called node.add(a, b).add(c, d) in one go. The reason is that in the first case the node variable wouldn't have changed, while the object that add is being called on may be different between the two calls in the chained version. The second version is equivalent to this:

temp = node.add(a, b)
temp.add(c, d)
del temp

If you want the results of chained calls to be the same as repeated calls to the function on the root node then you need to change your code to always return the root element, not the result of the recursive or iterative traversal. In the recursive version of the code, simply return self rather than returning the results of the recursive call. In the iterative version, return self rather than current.

Or you could do away with chaining all together and not return anything (which in Python is equivalent to returning None). This might be the most "Pythonic" solution (similar methods like list.append and set.add do not return anything).

Edit: Here's an explanation of the output.

You're starting with a single node (11). The first step is that you're calling add on it with arguments 7 and 0. That call is responsible for the first three lines of the output:

push'd self is (11), lifo is ((11), ())
popp'd self is (11), lifo is ()
returning self is (11 L* R(7))

The root node pushes itself onto your stack, then gets popped right back off again. A new node (7) is created, and added as the right child of (11) turning it into (11 L* R(7)).

I'm not sure where the next line of your output comes from:

heap [(11 L* R(7))]

It isn't printed by any of the code you've shown, so I'm going to ignore it (and the similar lines later on).

The first add call returned the called on, and then you're calling next add on it. It is still the same node, so the chaining is not doing anything tricky yet. The add call has arguments 4 and 1 and produces three more lines of output:

push'd self is (11 L* R(7)), lifo is ((11 L* R(7)), ())
popp'd self is (11 L* R(7)), lifo is ()
returning self is (11 L(4) R(7))

This time it adds the new node (4) as the left child of the root node. Otherwise it's the same as above. The third add is called on the same node again, but this time it does a bit more work. I'll explain what's happening this time line by line.

push'd self is (11 L(4) R(7)), lifo is ((11 L(4) R(7)), ())
popp'd self is (11 L(4) R(7)), lifo is ()

These first two lines are the same as what we've been seeing so far, as the root node is pushed then popped off the stack. However, this time the code sees that there's already a right child on the self node, so it pushes that child and loops again. Note that this second push doesn't have any print statement associated with it, so it might look like you're not having the same number of pushes and pops. But if you work through the logic, there is always one of each on each pass through the loop.

popp'd self is (7), lifo is ()
returning self is (7 L* R(10))

After the next node is popped, self is now the (7) node, rather than the root node it has been on every other run. A new (10) node is added as its right child and the node (now (7 L* R(10)) is returned. At this point your chaining is likely to start acting strange. If you had chained on another add, it would have been applied to the returned node, not to the root like before. So if you started with a (0) node in a variable heap, heap.add(1,0).add(2,1).add(3,2).add(4,3) would behave oddly: heap would become (0 L(2) R(1 L(4) R(3))), rather than (0 L(2 L(4) R*) R(1 L* R(3))) which is what you'd get if you didn't chain the calls.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks @Blckknght, the chaining is a convenience. it's the same result either ways.you are right, lifo isn't required for this (since, i go left, then right) but, it's just to keep the code generic (can change to modulo "x"). –  cogitate May 29 '13 at 0:58
    
helps a lot! however, anyone can explain what's going on with self there? –  cogitate May 29 '13 at 6:40
    
I'll edit my answer to include an explanation of the output. I think it's only confusing because you're reusing self in a bad way. Don't do that and you won't confuse yourself! –  Blckknght May 29 '13 at 7:47
    
thanks @Blckknght for your diligence, and i know what i am doing should not be done. however, i assure it's got nothing to do with chaining. so, what i really want is to know why it works the way it does? ( try the code w/o chaining it'd still do the same thing!) –  cogitate May 30 '13 at 2:31
    
if name == 'main': heap = HeapNode(11) print 'heap is %s'%(heap,) heap.add(7,0) print 'heap is %s'%(heap,) heap.add(4,1) print 'heap is %s'%(heap,) heap.add(10,2) print 'heap is %s'%(heap,) –  cogitate May 30 '13 at 3:23

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