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We are getting "java.lang.OutOfMemoryError : unable to create new native Thread" on 8GB RAM VM after 32k threads (ps -eLF| grep -c java)

However, "top" and "free -m" shows 50% free memory available. JDk is 64 bit and tried with both HotSpot and JRockit.Server has Linux 2.6.18

We also tried OS stack size (ulimit -s) tweaking and max process(ulimit -u) limits, limit.conf increase but all in vain.

Also we tried almost all possible of heap size combinations, keeping it low, high etc.

The script we use to run application is

/opt/jrockit-jdk1.6/bin/java -Xms512m -Xmx512m -Xss128k -jar JavaNatSimulator.jar /opt/tools/jnatclients/natSimulator.properties

Thanks for the reply.

We have tried editing /etc/security/limits.conf and ulimit but still that same

[root@jboss02 ~]# ulimit -a
core file size          (blocks, -c) 0
data seg size           (kbytes, -d) unlimited
scheduling priority             (-e) 0
file size               (blocks, -f) unlimited
pending signals                 (-i) 72192
max locked memory       (kbytes, -l) 32
max memory size         (kbytes, -m) unlimited
open files                      (-n) 65535
pipe size            (512 bytes, -p) 8
POSIX message queues     (bytes, -q) 819200
real-time priority              (-r) 0
stack size              (kbytes, -s) 10240
cpu time               (seconds, -t) unlimited
max user processes              (-u) 72192
virtual memory          (kbytes, -v) unlimited
file locks                      (-x) unlimited
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Operating systems have limits on the number of threads that you can create. Why are you creating more than 32k threads? Your system does most likely not have thousands of processor cores, creating so many threads is not useful. Use a thread pool (ExecutorService) instead. –  Jesper May 28 '13 at 10:11
    
Thanks for the reply. We are using an open source library and trying to load test that. Any that open source library is creating so many threads. But what i dont understand, is when "top" is showing 50% free memory then why OutOfMemory Error. –  Deepak Tewani May 28 '13 at 10:27
    
The open source library that we are using in ICE4j Library –  Deepak Tewani May 28 '13 at 10:31
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OutOfMemoryError does not necessarily mean heap space, or "general" RAM, was exhausted. In this case it's clear that the failure was due to the OS not having the resources to allocate an extra thread. Having 50% free memory is irrelevant to this particular failure. –  Andrzej Doyle May 28 '13 at 10:36
    
What are the other resources required for creating new threads. We were under the impression that if we increase the RAM, then we may able to create more threads. Kindly guide us –  Deepak Tewani May 28 '13 at 10:44
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6 Answers 6

This is not a memory problem, but an operating system resource problem. You are running out of native threads, i.e. how many threads your JVM can have.

This is an uncommon problem, because you rarely need that many. Do you have a lot of unconditional thread spawning where the threads should but doesn't finish?

You might consider rewriting into using Callable/Runnables under the control of an Executor if at all possible. There are plenty of standard executors with various behavior which your code can easily control.

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Thanks for the reply. We are using an open source library ICE4j and trying to load test that. Cant we increase the limit of threads in OS when we know that there is 50% memory left on the server. –  Deepak Tewani May 28 '13 at 10:37
    
Possibly, but I think it will not help you as such. If you run out of resources when load testing you need to be able to control what happens in your application. Why do you have 32000 threads active at once? –  Thorbjørn Ravn Andersen May 28 '13 at 10:44
    
We are creating 11K clients that uses 32 K threads for reading, writing data on UDP sockets. Out of these 32 K threads, 10K threads are keep alive threads that are used to keep the socket open –  Deepak Tewani May 28 '13 at 10:50
    
I believe this problem is solved in modern web servers. Also udp can loose packets - any reason you do not just use a web server? –  Thorbjørn Ravn Andersen May 28 '13 at 11:01
    
We cant use web servers because, what are we creating are clients that would talk with other clients. Both the clients can be behind symmetric, asymmetric nats . For their connectivity , we are using ice4j library. What i am not able to understand is , if server has 50% memory left then what jvm is not able to create more threads –  Deepak Tewani May 28 '13 at 11:05
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It's likely that your OS does not allow the number of threads you're trying to create, or you're hitting some limit in the JVM. Especially if it's such a round number as 32k, a limit of one kind or another is a very likely culprit.

Are you sure you truly need 32k threads? Most modern languages have some kind of support for pools of reusable threads - I'm sure Java has something in place too (like ExecutorService, as user Jesper mentioned). Perhaps you could request threads from such a pool, instead of manually creating new ones.

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Thanks for the reply We are using an open source library ICE4j and trying to load test that. Cant we increase the limit of threads in OS when we know that there is 50% memory left on the server. –  Deepak Tewani May 28 '13 at 10:35
    
We are creating 11K clients that uses 32 K threads for reading, writing data on UDP sockets. Out of these 32 K threads, 10K threads are keep alive threads that are used to keep the socket open –  Deepak Tewani May 28 '13 at 11:01
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If your Job is failing because of OutOfMemmory on nodes you can tweek your number of max maps and reducers and the JVM opts for each. mapred.child.java.opts (the default is 200Xmx) usually has to be increased based on your data nodes specific hardware.

This link might be helpful... pls check

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Thanks for the reply. –  Deepak Tewani May 28 '13 at 10:37
    
We have all already tried that change that is given on that link. But result is same :( –  Deepak Tewani May 28 '13 at 11:02
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I would recommend to also look at the Thread Stack Size and see if you get more threads created. The default Thread Stack Size for JRockit 1.5/1.6 is 1 MB for 64-bit VM on Linux OS. 32K threads will require a significant amount of physical and virtual memory to honor this requirement.

Try to reduce the Stack Size to 512 KB as a starting point and see if it helps creating more threads for your application. I also recommend to explore horizontal scaling e.g. splitting your application processing across more physical or virtual machines.

When using a 64-bit VM, the true limit will depend on the OS physical and virtual memory availability and OS tuning parameters such as ulimitc. I also recommend the following article as a reference:

OutOfMemoryError: unable to create new native thread – Problem Demystified

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First of all I wouldn't blame that much the OS/VM.. rather the developer who wrote the code that creates sooo many Threads. Basically somewhere in your code (or 3rd party) a lot of threads are created without control.

Carefully review the stacktraces/code and control the number of threads that get created. Normally your app shouldn't need a large amount of threads, if it does it's a different problem.

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your JBoss configuration has some issues, /opt/jrockit-jdk1.6/bin/java -Xms512m -Xmx512m Xms and Xmx are limiting your JBoss memory usage, to the configured value, so from the 8Gb you have the server is only ussing 512M + some extra for his own purpose, increase that number, remember to leave some free for the OS and other stuff running there and may be you get it running despite de unsavoury code. Fixing the code would be nice too, if you can.

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