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I am using following query:

SELECT 
  CURRENT_AFFAIRS_ID,
  IMPORTANT_EXAM 
FROM CURRENT_AFFAIRS_LANGUAGE 
WHERE CURRENT_AFFAIRS_ID IN (
  1362544236,
  1363764599,
  1363670667,
  1363516827,
  1363500146)  
AND IMPORTANT_EXAM IS NOT NULL 
AND IS_ACTIVE = 1 
AND IS_DELETED = 0

to display following data:

1363764599  Civil Services Exam, SSC Exams
1363670667  Bank Exams, SSC Exams
1363516827  Bank Exams, Civil Services Exam, SSC Exams
1363500146  Civil Services Exam, SSC Exams

My requirement is to count number of occurrences of string separated by comma (eg. Civil Services Exam)

I tried to do this by java coding.

But it seems too much complicated work.

Can it be possible using any function of oracle or on the database side ?

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1  
How far did you get with Java? –  heikkim May 28 '13 at 10:16
    
@Ankit, you want to count how many exams are there for each row? –  Eat Å Peach May 28 '13 at 10:24

2 Answers 2

From 11g you can try REGEXP_COUNT

SELECT 
  CURRENT_AFFAIRS_ID,
  IMPORTANT_EXAM ,
  regexp_count(IMPORTANT_EXAM , '[^,]+')
FROM CURRENT_AFFAIRS_LANGUAGE 
WHERE CURRENT_AFFAIRS_ID IN (
  1362544236,
  1363764599,
  1363670667,
  1363516827,
  1363500146)  
AND IMPORTANT_EXAM IS NOT NULL 
AND IS_ACTIVE = 1 
AND IS_DELETED = 0

Here is a sqlfiddle demo

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As a quick-and-dirty option you can use regexp_replace to strip out everything in the string except the commas, count those and add one. That assumes the string are well-formed.

SELECT 
  CURRENT_AFFAIRS_ID,
  IMPORTANT_EXAM,
  LENGTH(regexp_replace(IMPORTANT_EXAM, '[^,]', '')) + 1 AS EXAMS
FROM CURRENT_AFFAIRS_LANGUAGE 
WHERE CURRENT_AFFAIRS_ID IN (
  1362544236,
  1363764599,
  1363670667,
  1363516827,
  1363500146)  
AND IMPORTANT_EXAM IS NOT NULL 
AND IS_ACTIVE = 1 
AND IS_DELETED = 0;

SQL Fiddle.

Edit: if you are on 11g then regexp_count is even better, as A.B.Cade shows - use that if you can. This regexp_replace option will work from 10g, so I'll leave it here for now...

I'm not sure why you're storing multiple values in one string though. You should move the exams to a separate table, and then have a mapping table that shows which exams are available in which languages.

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