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I'm solving Project Euler problems for kicks, I'm currently at number 10.

First of all: I know there are other solutions, I'm currently writing another method using the sieve of Eratosthenes. What I'd like your help with is understanding why this code does not work.

This is my code (the problems involves finding the sum of every prime under 2 million). The prime-checking method seems to work fine, but the result is way less than it should be.

class Euler10
{
    public static void Main()
    {
        long sum = 0; // Was originally an int. Thanks Soner Gönül!
        for(int i = 1; i < 2000000; i++) 
        {
            if (CheckIfPrime(i) == true)
                sum += i;
        }
        System.Console.WriteLine(sum);
        System.Console.Read();
    }

    static bool CheckIfPrime(int number)
    {
        if (number <= 1)
            return false;
        if (number == 2)
            return true;
        if (number % 2 == 0)
            return false;

        for (int i = 3; i*i < number; i += 2)
        {
            if ((number % i) == 0)
                return false;
        }
        return true;
    }
}

The number I get is 1,308,111,344, which is two orders of magnitude lower than it should be. The code is so simple I am baffled by this error.

EDIT: making sum a long solved the digit problem, thanks everyone! Now, though, I get 143042032112 as an answer: the i*i in CheckIfPrime() isn't always right. Using the sqrt() function and adding one (to compensate for the int cast) gives the correct result. Here's the correct CheckIfPrime() function:

 bool CheckIfPrime(int number)
    {
        if (number <= 1)
            return false;
        if (number == 2)
            return true;
        if (number % 2 == 0)
            return false;
        int max = 1 + (int)System.Math.Sqrt(number);
        for (int i = 3; i < max; i += 2)
        {
            if ((number % i) == 0)
                return false;
        }
        return true;
    }

EDIT 2: Will Ness helped me optimize the code further (calculating number's square root and comparing it to i is slower than elevating i^2 and then comparing it to number): the problem with the original method is that it didn't take into consideration edge cases in which number is the exact square of i, thus sometimes returning true instead of false. The correct code for CheckIfPrime(), then, is:

bool CheckIfPrime(int number)
    {
        if (number <= 1)
            return false;
        if (number == 2)
            return true;
        if (number % 2 == 0)
            return false;

        for (int i = 3; i*i <= number; i += 2)
        {
            if ((number % i) == 0)
                return false;
        }
        return true;
    }

Thanks again people!

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1  
That's not the Sieve of Eratosthenes, you are just testing for prime numbers by trial division. –  starblue May 28 '13 at 15:01
    
As others have noted, you're exceeding the bounds of 32 bit arithmetic. Two things to consider: first, consider using checked arithmetic; though it is slower, you would have found your bug immediately. Second, there are Euler problems that will exceed the bounds of 64 bit arithmetic; consider using BigInteger. It is slower but it has no particular bound on its range. (Should you need arbitrarily precise rationals for any reason, Microsoft Solver Foundation has a Rational class; it's a free download.) –  Eric Lippert May 28 '13 at 15:08
1  
Finally, there are lots of ways to make your prime check faster. For example, you can speed it up by a considerable factor by checking for 2 and 3, and then for(int i = 6; i * i < number; i += 6) { if ((number % ( i - 1 ) == 0 || number % (i + 1) == 0) That way you are checking for divisibility by 5, 7, 11, 13, 17, 19, ... and skipping checking 4, 6, 8, 9, 10, 12, 14, 15, 16, ... instead of what you're doing which is merely skipping 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, 14, ... there's no need to check any number that is divisible by three already, since you already checked that. –  Eric Lippert May 28 '13 at 15:13

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Your code does not work because it tries using a 32-bit int to hold a number that exceeds the highest value in a 32-bit variable. The answer to the problem is 142,913,828,922, which needs 38 bits.

Changing the data type of sum to long should fix this problem.

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Spoilers, sweetie! –  Eight-Bit Guru May 28 '13 at 10:30
    
@MatthewWatson how does the cast prevent SO? Wouldn't i simply stop increasing when reaching a 32bit value, like sum does? –  Christian Fratta May 28 '13 at 10:53

Using long should help.http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ctetwysk.aspx Gives you a 64 bit integer where as int is only 32 bits.

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You are using int for sum variable which is 32-bit but you are try to assign it more than Int32.Maximum which is 2,147,483,647.

But your result is 143,042,032,112 which needs more bits than 32 for storing it.

Set its type as long which stores 64 bit.

long sum = 0;

Here a working DEMO.

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for (... i=3 ; i*i < number; i+=2 ) is wrong. It should be

for (... i=3 ; i*i <= number; i+=2 )
 ...

both i and number must be of the same type of course; this will almost never give you an overflow, since you start from 3 (unless number is very big, close to the upper limit of the type's range).

The comparison should be inclusive to catch cases where number is a square of a prime.

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1  
"this will never give you an overflow, since you start from 3" and the limit is small enough. You could get overflow if the limit was close to the type's limit. [I know you know that, but it should be said for completeness.] –  Daniel Fischer May 28 '13 at 12:26

Your algorithm is not the Sieve of Eratosthenes; the modulo operator gives it away. Your algorithm is trial division by odd numbers. Here is a function using the Sieve of Eratosthenes:

function sumPrimes(n)
    sum := 0
    sieve := makeArray(2..n, True)
    for p from 2 to n step 1
        if sieve[p]
            sum := sum + p
            for i from p * p to n step p
                sieve[i] := False
    return sum

Calling sumPrimes(2000000) gives the answer, which I won't write down out of respect for Project Euler. That function runs in time O(n log log n), which is much better than the O(n^2) of your original program. There are better ways to sieve, but that is simple, and easy to get right, and good enough for most purposes, including yours. You should get an answer in less than a second.

I'll leave it to you to translate to C# with appropriate data types.

If you're interested in a somewhat larger version of this problem, I calculated the sum of the first billion primes at my blog: 11138479445180240497.

share|improve this answer
    
I know it's not the sieve, what I meant is that I was working on the sieve in another file (I wanted to know why this code didn't work, not that there is a more efficient way to solve the problem). Thanks a lot for the answer, I'm definitely checking PP out! –  Christian Fratta May 28 '13 at 13:20

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