Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I would like to know what the @interface in objective C is? is it just where the programmer want to declare the variables, class name or method names...? I am not sure whether it is like interface in Java. And about the @protocol in objective C as well. It seems like the interface in Java more. Could anyone give me detail explanation please. I truly appreciate it.

share|improve this question
up vote 56 down vote accepted

An interface is where you define the attributes and operations of class. You must set out the implementation too.

A protocol is like an interface for java.

e.g.

@protocol Printing
    -(void) print;
@end

can be implemented

by declaring (confusingly in the interface)

@interface Fraction: NSObject <Printing, NSCopying> {
//etc..

The confusing thing for java developers is that the curly braces {} are not the end of the interface e.g.

@interface Forwarder : Object
{
    id recipient; 
} //This is not the end of the interface - just the operations


- (id) recipient;
- (id) setRecipient:(id) _recipient; 
//these are attributes.

@end
//This is the end of the interface
share|improve this answer
7  
Overall, pretty good explanation, but comes off as somewhat biased that Java does it the "better" way. As with so many things, the terminology is relative to the language. It helps to remember that Objective-C predates Java, and Java drew quite a bit from it, including the concept of interfaces from protocols. virtualschool.edu/objectivec/influenceOnJava.html It would arguably have been less confusing if Java had retained the same name, but they didn't because Java doesn't have a separate .h file which (in C/C++) contains the "interface" for a compilation unit. – Quinn Taylor Nov 10 '09 at 13:18
10  
@QuinnTaylor I didn't want to say 'Java does it better' but I phrased it that way as the OP asked the question with relation to the Java language. – Johnno Nolan Nov 10 '09 at 15:59
    
From the viewpoint of Objective C only, what is the difference between the two? Both seem to enforce that certain methods be implemented by the classes that are formed based on them. Is the only difference is that protocols are classless so to speak, while interfaces need to be implemented? – AttitudeMonger Oct 13 '14 at 23:05

The @interface in Objective-C has nothing to do with Java interfaces. It simply declares a public interface of a class, its public API. (And member variables, as you have already observed.) Java-style interfaces are called protocols in Objective-C and are declared using the @protocol directive. You should read The Objective-C Programming Language by Apple, it’s a good book – short and very accessible.

share|improve this answer

probably good if you take a look at this + I thought it was great help to understand

From the article:

@interface

C++

Foo.h

#ifndef __FOO_H__
#define __FOO_H__
class Foo
{
...
};

Foo.cpp

#include "Foo.h"
...

Objective-C

Foo.h

@interface Foo : NSObject
{
...
}
@end

Foo.m

#import "Foo.h"

@implementation Foo
...
@end

@protocol

C++

struct MyInterface
{
  void foo() = 0;
}

class A : MyInterface
{
public:
  void override foo() { ... }
}

Objective-C

@protocol MyInterface
-(void) foo;
@end

@interface Foo : NSObject <MyInterface>
{
 -(void) foo {...}
...
}
@end
share|improve this answer
1  
+1 Great resource. Pretty much every C/C++ programmer's go-to guide when stepping into the Objective-C realm. – KillAWatt1705 Apr 16 '13 at 14:51
    
About above example @protocol defines some general methods, @interface defines some custom methods and @implementation implements that interface. @interface has not any implementation. Also if foo method is same to protocol's one, so it should not be repeated on interface. – S.M.Mousavi Jan 16 at 14:37

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.