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I want to model the following situation in OOP:

enter image description here

I want that the Freight class to be an abstract class, because I would like that my program charges some extra fees according to the Degree of Hazardousness that one piece of cargo has.

Actually the problem that I got is that I want that the Freight class to be an array of objects. I mean that it can store Piece of luggages and Pieces of Cargo. My question is where can I put a method call addItem? should I put it into the Piece of Luggage and Piece of Cargo classes? or should I put a general abstract method called addItem into the Freight class? something like this (I am using Java for this purpose):

abstract class Freight{
//other things here
protected Freight[] fr=Freight[10];
protected int numItems;

abstract addItem();
}

class PieceOfLuggage extends Freight{
//other things
       public PieceOfLuggage(int iden,double weight,int id){
           super(iden,weight,id)
       }
       public addItem(){
           fr[numItems]=this;
           numItems++;
       }
}

class PieceOfCargo extends Freight{
      private degreeHazard;
      public PieceOfCargo(int iden,double weight,int id,int degHazard){
           super(iden,weight,id);
           degreeHazard=degHazard;
      }
      public addItem(){
          fr[numItems]=this;
          numItems++;
      }
}

so that in my main program I can do something like:

Luggage l1=new Luggage(100,50,1234);   //ident, weight, id
Cargo c1=new Cargo(300,123.56,1111,1); //ident, weight, id, degree of hazard
l1.addItem();
c1.addItem();

any suggestion where I can put that addItem method?, so that the class Freight contains an array of objects of type luggage and cargo?

Thanks

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4  
That doesn't make sense. How can a piece of cargo consist of pieces of cargo? You're muddling the original clean design. If you want something that is a collection of freight items then model that as a separate class. –  Sebastian Redl May 28 '13 at 12:14
    
@SebastianRedl Consider a pallet of individual items. While I'm not arguing the OP's idea is a good one, cargo may be consolidated at a number of points in the shipping process. –  Dave Newton May 28 '13 at 12:18

8 Answers 8

up vote 5 down vote accepted

If you want Freight to be able to hold those other types you have three options:

Make each class extend Freight:

class Luggage extends Freight

OR

give Freight an array of each:

class Freight
{  
     Luggage[] luggage = new Luggage[10];  
     Cargo[] cargo = new Cargo[10];  

     addItem(Luggage luggage){...}  
     addItem(Cargo cargo){...}
}  

OR

make Luggage and Cargo extend a base class and put that inside Freight:

   class DeliveryItem  
   {  
        addItem(DeliveryItem item){...}  
   }  

class Luggage extends DeliveryItem  
{  
    //override addItem if need be
}    

class Freight
{  
     List<DeliveryItem> items = new ArrayList<DeliveryItem>();  

     List<DeliveryItem> getItems()  
     {  
        return this.items;  
      }

     void addItem(DeliverItem item)  
     {
         this.items.add(item);
     }  
}  
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for giving various options. –  christopher May 28 '13 at 12:23
    
@Woot4Moo why not use an interface "DeliveryItem"? –  Spring May 28 '13 at 12:24
    
@Spring because there is most likely some default functionality that can be provided. That is a standard add function with a standard implementation that can be overridden if there exists some need to provide an enhanced add. –  Woot4Moo May 28 '13 at 12:32
    
@jma updated to show where additem could go –  Woot4Moo May 28 '13 at 12:36
    
@jma are you asking how Freight gets access to its internal set of DeliveryItems? –  Woot4Moo May 28 '13 at 12:50

I think that there is a design flaw here if I understand this right. You should use a container object like Freight which contains a Collection of items. But if you stick with this design what you need here is a Composite I think.

Excerpt from wikipedia:

interface Freight{

    void addItem();
}

/** "Composite" */
class CompositePieceOfCargo implements Freight {

    private List<Freight> childFreights = new ArrayList<Freight>();

    public void addItem(Freight freight) {
        childFreights.add(freight);
    }

}

/** "Leaf" */
class PieceOfCargo implements Freight {
    private degreeHazard;

    // your methods here
}

You can use a "Leaf" object in case you are dealing with a concrete Freight and if it is just a "container" you can use the "Composite".

This pseudo code points out the design flaw: In a Leaf object you can't provide a sensible implementation for addItem.

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1  
ill give a point if you make it match OP's class hierarchy. –  Woot4Moo May 28 '13 at 12:17
    
Ok I corrected it. –  Adam Arold May 28 '13 at 12:24

Your design confuses the "has many" kind of relationship with the "is a" kind of relationship.

PieceOfLugagge is not a Freight, sinces a Freight is composed from one or many pieces of lugagge.

A better design is as follows.

enter image description here

When you think of it, pieces of lugagge can also have a hazardousness degree, even when it is zero.

Freight has a collection of FreightItem, each FreightItem can be a PieceOfLugagge or a PieceOfCargo.

Freigth as an addItem() method ( not shown in drawing ) that accepts a FreightItem and adds it to the collection.

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Consider breaking your Freight class into two classes:

  • A superclass representing a single object of Freight (e.g., FreightItem).
  • A collection of freight items (e.g., FreightGroup).

In general, one heuristic for object-oriented design is to make each class represent exactly one concept.

share|improve this answer

I mean that it can store Piece of luggages and Pieces of Cargo.

This sounds an awful lot more like a Composition relationship, than an inheritance relationship. For example, think of a more logical superclass, like Item, and make Cargo and Luggage a subclass of that.

public abstract class Item  {}

public class Luggage extends Item {}

public class Cargo extends Item{}

Then in your Freight class, you will need an array, and this can be of type Item.

public class Freight
{
    Item[] items;
}

The addItem method

This can now go in the Freight class, considering this is the one that is holding all of your items. Then you can implement any abstract methods in your Item class, and ensure that your Luggage and Cargo class implement those methods.

Degree of Hazard

Let's say, every Item has a degree of hazardousness. What you CAN do, is put the degree value in your superclass, Item, like this:

public abstract class Item {
    int hazard;

    public Item(int hazard)
    {
           // So hazard is in the superclass.
         this.hazard = hazard;
    }

    public int getHazard() { return hazard; }
}

Then, in the constructor of one of your subclasses, for example Luggage, you can have:

public Luggage()
{
    super(5);
    // Example value.
    // Rest of constructor.
}
share|improve this answer
    
why not use interface for Item class? –  Spring May 28 '13 at 12:25
    
think my edit just highlighted an advantage of using an abstract class. –  christopher May 28 '13 at 12:27
Actually the problem that I got is that I want that the Freight class to be an array of objects.

I think your concept mixes up holding the freight and being the freight, which leads to your design problem. Without knowing your whole environment, think about this design:

class FreightContainer: Holds your array (actually I would recommend a LinkedList or ArrayList, depending on the O(n) you want to have during runtime). Is responsible for adding (,publishing) and removing your Freight items, doing limit checks and so on. So this is where you would implement addItem(Freight newItem).

class Freight and subclasses: Are responsible for being the freight, thus having all attributes alike your UML above.

There might be further adjustments, but that would need further information on your problem.

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I think you should split your Freight class. I will do something like that:

public interface Freight
public class Luggage extends Freight
public class Cargo extends Freight

public class FreightCollection
{
   private ArrayList<Freight> freights;

   public FreightCollection(){
      freights = new ArrayList<Freight>()
   }

   public void addFreight(Freight freight){
      freights.add(freight);
   }
}

The add method must belong to a collection, not to the item it-self.

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As you want your Freight class to hold a collection of PieceOfLuggage and PieceOfCargo, I think you want them to extend a class other than Freight.

class Freight{
       protected FreightPiece[] fr=FreightPiece[10];
       protected int numItems;

       public addItem(FreightPiece piece)
       {
           // add the piece to fr
       }
}

abstract class FreightPiece {

}

class PieceOfLuggage extends FreightPiece{
       public PieceOfLuggage(int iden,double weight,int id){
           super(iden,weight,id)
       }
}

class PieceOfCargo extends FreightPiece{
      private degreeHazard;
      public PieceOfCargo(int iden,double weight,int id,int degHazard){
           super(iden,weight,id);
           degreeHazard=degHazard;
      }
}

So then

Freight fr = new Freight();
PieceOfLuggage l1=new PieceOfLuggage(100,50,1234);   //ident, weight, id
PieceOfCargo c1=new PieceOfCargo(300,123.56,1111,1); //ident, weight, id, degree of hazard
fr.addItem(l1);
fr.addItem(c1);
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