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In C# when debugging threads for example, you can see each thread's ID.

I couldn't find a way to get that same thread, programmatically. I could not even get the ID of the current thread (in the properties of the Thread.currentThread).

So, I wonder how does Visual Studio get the IDs of the threads, and is there a way to get the handle of the thread with id 2345, for example?

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11 Answers 11

up vote 173 down vote accepted

GetThreadId returns the ID of a given native thread. There's ways to make it work with managed threads, I'm sure, all you need to find is the thread handle and pass it to that function.

GetCurrentThreadId returns the ID of the current thread.

For the latest version of .NET, the current recommended way of doing it is System.Threading.Thread.CurrentThread.ManagedThreadId.

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36  
Since I found this, typed it, and then was told it was Deprecated, the current way to do this is Thread.CurrentThread.ManagedThreadId –  James Jan 19 '11 at 0:29
2  
ManagedThreadId is not a robust approach to identify threads as the ManagedThreadId property id's get reused by your app. So it is not a reliable identifier for threads in some scenarios and you will experience the exception : "An item with the same key has already been added." at line... Give the thread a unique name when you create it. –  ForerMedia May 10 '12 at 10:50
1  
Thanks for updating with the most current way to do it for the last version, really appreciate it. Would upvote twice if I could :) –  Javier Sep 5 '12 at 18:58
2  
There's some very bad advice going around on this post. A few people are recommending to use "ManagedThreadId" to identify a thread. I edited the post to remove the recommendation - what very few have pointed out is that there are different types of thread ids. Managed thread IDs are not the same thing as unmanaged thread ids, and if people were to copy & paste that code some very subtle synchronization bugs could occur. The documentation on MSDN for the Thread class is very clear about this. View the remarks at the class level. –  ShadowChaser Apr 30 '13 at 5:13
3  
You don't synchronize on ID's though, you use synchronization primitives like mutexes. This is only for debugging purposes. –  Blindy Apr 30 '13 at 13:59

In C# when debugging threads for example, you can see each thread's ID.

This will be the Ids of the managed threads. ManagedThreadId is a member of Thread so you can get the Id from from any Thread object. This will get you the current ManagedThreadID:

Thread.CurrentThread.ManagedThreadId

To get an OS thread by it's OS thread ID (not ManagedThreadID), you can try a bit of linq.

int unmanagedId = 2345;
ProcessThread myThread = (from ProcessThread entry in Process.GetCurrentProcess().Threads
   where entry.Id == unmanagedId 
   select entry).First();

It seems there is no way to enumerate the managed threads and no relation between ProcessThread and Thread, so getting a managed thread by it's Id is a tough one.

For more details on Managed vs Unmanaged threading see this MSDN arcticle.

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4  
Why didn't anyone else come up with this simple answer? –  Stefan Steinegger Nov 30 '10 at 16:51
1  
This does not work. GetCurrentProcess().Threads returns a ProcessThreadCollection, which is not convertible to Threads. I don't see an easy fix. –  mafu Jan 25 '11 at 9:31
1  
@ mafutrct, updated answer. That property should really be called .ProcessThreads! Thanks. –  badbod99 Jan 27 '11 at 11:40
    
Recommend this post be rewritten to make it clearer that the two thread ids are different. If someone fails to read the last sentence, they'll just plug ManagedThreadId and try to map it against ProcessThread.Id, creating havok. –  ShadowChaser Apr 30 '13 at 5:17
    
I've added a link to a helpful MSDN acticle highlighting the difference. However, the question was related to getting the thread ID for debugging (which in this case is the ManagedThreadID). I don't think cluttering the answer with details of the difference between OS and managed threads is useful. –  badbod99 Apr 30 '13 at 14:52

You can use the deprecated AppDomain.GetCurrentThreadId to get the ID of the currently running thread. This method uses a PInvoke to the Win32 API method GetCurrentThreadID, and will return the Windows thread ID.

This method is marked as deprecated because the .NET Thread object does not correspond to a single Windows thread, and as such there is no stable ID which can be returned by Windows for a given .NET thread.

See configurator's answer for more reasons why this is the case.

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According to MSDN:

An operating-system ThreadId has no fixed relationship to a managed thread, because an unmanaged host can control the relationship between managed and unmanaged threads. Specifically, a sophisticated host can use the CLR Hosting API to schedule many managed threads against the same operating system thread, or to move a managed thread between different operating system threads.

So basically, the Thread object does not necessarily correspond to an OS thread - which is why it doesn't have the native ID exposed.

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Debug/Threads window in VS2010 shows "Managed thread ID". How can I get this one? –  Pavel Radzivilovsky Jul 14 '10 at 17:28
1  
Use the ManagedThreadID property msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/… . This isn't the same as the OS thread ID though. –  configurator Jul 16 '10 at 2:30

To get the OS ID use:

AppDomain.GetCurrentThreadId()
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1  
GetHashCode isn't necessarily unique! and should not use it to identify a thread. –  Dror Helper Nov 5 '09 at 9:12
2  
You could use AppDomain.GetCurrentThreadId() if you want the OS thread ID, but multiple .NET threads could in theory share the same OS thread. Thread.GetHashCode() is guaranteed to return a value that is unique process-wide, which is what you probably want. –  Mark Byers Nov 5 '09 at 9:14
    
Perhaps 'AppDomain.GetCurrentThreadId();' would have been a better answer to this question. Should I answer the question twice? Delete this? Or someone should suggest this, then I will vote them up. :) –  Mark Byers Nov 5 '09 at 9:23
2  
The method is marked as deprecated, and with good reason. Please see my answer and configurator's for the fuller picture. –  Tragedian Nov 5 '09 at 9:28
1  
Well this is the only way to get to the OS Thread ID. And this should be marked as the correct answer. Even though that i'm not going to rely on this any more. –  LolaRun Nov 5 '09 at 9:35

To find the current thread Id use - `Thread.CurrentThread.ManagedThreadId'. But in this case you might need the current win32 thread id - use pInvoke to get it with this function:

[DllImport("Kernel32", EntryPoint = "GetCurrentThreadId", ExactSpelling = true)]
public static extern Int32 GetCurrentWin32ThreadId();

First you'll need to save the managed thread id and win32 thread id connection - use a dictionary that maps a win32 id to managed thread.

Then to find a thread by it's id iterate over the process's thread using Process.GetCurrentProcess().Threads and find the thread with that id:

foreach (ProcessThread thread in Process.GetCurrentProcess().Threads)
{
     var managedThread = win32ToManagedThread[thread.id];
     if((managedThread.ManagedThreadId == threadId)
     {
         return managedThread;
     }
}
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I believe the OP is asking for the OS ID of the thread, which is not the same as the managed thread ID. –  Brian Rasmussen Nov 5 '09 at 9:10
    
This code does not work: Process.Threads returns a collection of ProcessThread objects, this is not the same as (nor does it inherit) Thread: (thread as Thread) will return a null reference. –  Fredrik Mörk Nov 5 '09 at 9:13
    
I've noticed that code code had a few bugs - fixed it try it now –  Dror Helper Nov 5 '09 at 9:24
1  
I ended up using a dictionary that maps a win32 id to a managed thread. –  Contango Aug 20 '12 at 15:20

For those about to hack:

    public static int GetNativeThreadId(Thread thread)
    {
        var f = typeof(Thread).GetField("DONT_USE_InternalThread",
            BindingFlags.GetField | BindingFlags.NonPublic | BindingFlags.Instance);

        var pInternalThread = (IntPtr)f.GetValue(thread);
        var nativeId = Marshal.ReadInt32(pInternalThread, (IntPtr.Size == 8) ? 548 : 348); // found by analyzing the memory
        return nativeId;
    }
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From managed code you have access to instances of the Thread type for each managed thread. Thread encapsulates the concept of an OS thread and as of the current CLR there's a one-to-one correspondance with managed threads and OS threads. However, this is an implementation detail, that may change in the future.

The ID displayed by Visual Studio is actually the OS thread ID. This is not the same as the managed thread ID as suggested by several replies.

The Thread type does include a private IntPtr member field called DONT_USE_InternalThread, which points to the underlying OS structure. However, as this is really an implementation detail it is not advisable to pursue this IMO. And the name sort of indicates that you shouldn't rely on this.

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To use GetThreadId you'd need the handle - which you get from the DONT_USE field. –  configurator Nov 5 '09 at 9:22
    
I know, but as I said you can't really count on the fact that managed threads maps directly to OS threads, so I wouldn't count on it. –  Brian Rasmussen Nov 5 '09 at 9:26
    
Thanks a lot for the clarification, and summurizing the problem. But now if multiple managed threads can correspond to a single OS thread (As configurator stated - and he's thanked), that means that VS is showing OS threads and not Managed Threads. –  LolaRun Nov 5 '09 at 9:46
    
@OhrmaZd: Yes, VS2005/2008 shows OS IDs for managed threads in the Threads window. VS2010B2 actually shows both OS and managed ID per thread. –  Brian Rasmussen Nov 5 '09 at 9:58
    
@Brian Rasmussen: Now that's an identification for a managed thread! Thanks for sharing your knowledge. –  LolaRun Nov 5 '09 at 10:03

If it is valid for VS studio to display unmanaged thread ids in the Threads debug window... then why isn't it valid for me to want to access this id sometimes? For example, I might like to write a simple trace message to a debug window that displays both the managed and unmanaged thread ids, so when I break in the debugger I can see which trace statements were written by each of my threads. If I am interested in what a particular thread is doing based on the trace messages it has written, I can go to the threads window, identify the thread of interest by it's unmanaged thread id, switch to it and then inspect it's call stack, local variables etc, etc... If I can only write the managed thread ids into the trace messages, then I cannot identify which thread is which in the Threads window.

For M$ to stop us from accessing this unmanaged thread id is daft. We are big boys. We can handle the fact that it's not always a stable identifier for a managed thread. Oooooooh!! How scary!!!

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System.Threading.Thread.CurrentThread.Name

System.Threading.Thread.CurrentThread.ManagedThreadId
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1  
That is not the ID of the thread. –  Brian Rasmussen Nov 5 '09 at 9:08

Please check out the answer of this SO question. It has a solution, that looks quite acceptable.

Set thread processor affinity in Microsoft .Net

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i think it's a difference problem. Here there are broader range of solutions and explanations for this specific question. Thank you –  LolaRun Jun 28 '13 at 7:36

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