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This question already has an answer here:

can anyone tell me what is the mistake in this program

#include <iostream>
#include <algorithm>

using namespace std;

int main()
{
    string str = "Now";

    transform(str.begin(), str.end(), str.begin(), toupper);

    cout<<str;

    return 0;
}

Error:

"no matching function for call to 'transform(__gnu_cxx::__normal_iterator<char*, std::basic_string<char, std::char_traits<char>, std::allocator<char> > >, __gnu_cxx::__normal_iterator<char*, std::basic_string<char, std::char_traits<char>, std::allocator<char> > >, __gnu_cxx::__normal_iterator<char*, std::basic_string<char, std::char_traits<char>, std::allocator<char> > >, <unresolved overloaded function type>)'
compilation terminated due to -Wfatal-errors."
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marked as duplicate by Xeo, Tony The Lion, R. Martinho Fernandes, juanchopanza, soon May 28 '13 at 13:02

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

2  
Try ..., ::toupper); – Stefan Näwe May 28 '13 at 12:55
    
Try #include <locale> and then std::ctype::toupper as an argument. – heap underrun May 28 '13 at 13:08
    
When you're dealing with errors you can't figure out, it might be beneficial to compile without -Wfatal-errors because that switch can suppress relevant information. – Praetorian May 28 '13 at 13:08

There are two functions with name toupper. One from cctype header:

int toupper( int ch );

And second from locale header:

charT toupper( charT ch, const locale& loc );

Compiler can't deduce which function should be used, since you allow namespace std. You should use scope resolution operator(::) to choose function defined in global space:

transform(str.begin(), str.end(), str.begin(), ::toupper);

Or, better: Do not use using namespace std.


Thanks to @Praetorian -

This is probably the cause of the error, but adding :: may not always work. If you include cctype toupper is not guaranteed to exist in the global namespace. A cast can provide the necessary disambiguation static_cast<int(*)(int)>(std::toupper)

So, the call should look like:

std::transform
(
    str.begin(), str.end(),
    str.begin(),
    static_cast<int(*)(int)>(std::toupper)
);
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1  
This is probably the cause of the error, but adding :: may not always work. If you include cctype toupper is not guaranteed to exist in the global namespace. A cast can provide the necessary disambiguation static_cast<int(*)(int)>(std::toupper) – Praetorian May 28 '13 at 13:05
    
@Praetorian, yes, you're right, thank you. – soon May 28 '13 at 13:09
    
yes got it thanks a lot – user2413497 May 28 '13 at 13:09

In order to use toupper, you need to include header file:

#include <cctype>

You also need to include header file:

#include <string>

The problem is the std::toupper takes int as parameter, while std::transform will pass char into the function, therefore, it has a problem (by courtesy of @juanchopanza).

You may try to use:

 #include <functional>
 std::transform(s.begin(), s.end(), s.begin(), std::ptr_fun<int, int>(std::toupper));

See example code from std::transform

Or you can implement your own toupper that takes char as argument.

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I include <cctype> but it is of no use – user2413497 May 28 '13 at 12:56
    
@user2413497 try to check the link I included? It has complete example at the bottom of the link with explanations. – taocp May 28 '13 at 12:57
    
@juanchopanza I agree. I will update the post now. – taocp May 28 '13 at 13:07
    
@juanchopanza, are you sure? Last argument for std::transform function is templated. std::transform doesn't care, accept it int or char. From cppreference: The type Type must be such that an object of type InputIt can be dereferenced and then implicitly converted to Type. The type Ret must be such that an object of type OutputIt can be dereferenced and assigned a value of type Ret. – soon May 28 '13 at 13:25
    
@soon do you have a good explanation why it would not work with std::toupper? – juanchopanza May 28 '13 at 13:46

As the compiler has buried in its error message, the real problem is that toupper is an overloaded function, and the compiler can't figure out which one you want. There's the C toupper(int) function which may or may not be a macro (may not in C++, but does the C library care?), and there's std::toupper(char, locale) from (pulled in by without doubt), which you made available globally with your using namespace std;.

Tony's solution works because he accidentally resolved the overloading issue with his separate function.

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