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I have an object PersistentObject which you can think of as plucked out of an ORM, it's an object which you can use natively in your programming language (agnostic to the backend), and it has methods load and save for committing changes to a database.

I want my PersistentObject to be faultable, i.e. I want to be able to initialize it as a lightweight pointer which server only to reference the object in the database. And when (if) the moment comes then I can fault it into memory by actually going to the database and fetching it. The point here is to be able to add this object to collections as a reference without ever needing to fetch the object. I also want to be able to initialize the object the old fashioned way with classic constructor and then commit it to the database (this is handy when you need to create a new object from scratch, rather than manipulating an existing one).

So I have an object which has multiple constructors: a classic one, and one that creates a fault based on the object GUID in the database. And when the object is initialized as a fault, I want instance methods to be able to access that state as an instance variable because operations on a fault are different to those on a fully loaded object. But for obvious reasons, I don't want clients messing with my inner state so I don't want to create an accessor for the ivar. So my question is, how do I init/set an ivar from a class method in an object instance in such a way that outside clients of my class can't mess with it (i.e. set its value to something else)?

Sorry for all the words, the code should make it a lot clearer. I've tried something which obviously doesn't work but illustrates the point nicely. Apologies if this is an elementary question, I'm quite new to Ruby.

class PersistentObject
    def initialize(opts={})
        @id = opts[:id] || new_id
        @data = opts[:data] || nil
    end

    def self.new_fault(id)
        new_object = PersistentObject.new
        new_object.@fault = true            #<----- How do you achieve this?
        new_object
    end

    def new_id
        #returns a new globally unique id
    end

    def fault?
        @fault
    end

    def load
        if fault?
            #fault in the object from the database by fetching the record corresponding to the id
            @fault = false
        end
    end

    def save
        #save the object to the database
    end
end

#I create a new object as a fault, I can add it to collections, refer to it all I want, etc., but I can't access it's data, I just have a lightweight pointer which can be created without ever hitting the database
o = PersistentObject.new_fault("123")

#Now let's suppose I need the object's data, so I'll load it
o.load

#Now I can use the object, change it's data, etc.
p o.data
o.data = "foo"

#And when I'm ready I can save it back to the database
o.save

EDIT: I should say that my heart isn't set on accessing that instance's ivar from the class method, I'd be more than happy to hear of an idiomatic Ruby pattern for solving this problem.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You could use instance_eval:

new_object.instance_eval { @fault = true }

or instance_variable_set:

new_object.instance_variable_set(:@fault, true)
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If your goal is to set the instance variable then I agree with Stephan's answer. To answer your edit, another approach is to add another option to the constructor:

class PersistentObject
    def initialize(opts={})
        @id = opts[:id] || new_id
        @data = opts[:data] || nil
        @fault = opts[:fault] || false
    end

    def self.new_fault(id)
        self.new(fault: true)
    end

    ...

Unfortunately, Ruby's unconventional implementation of private/protected make them non-viable for this problem.

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This is not possible. And I am not talking about "not possible in Ruby", I am talking about mathematically, logically impossible. You have two requirements:

  1. Another object should not be allowed to set @fault.
  2. Another object should be allowed to set @fault. (Remember, PersistentObject is just yet another object.)

It should be immediately obvious that those two requirements contradict each other and thus what you want simply cannot be done. Period.

You can create an attr_writer for @fault, then PersistentObject can write to it … but so can everybody else. You can make that writer private, then PersistentObject needs to use metaprogramming (i.e. send) to circumvent that access protection … but so can everybody else. You can use instance_variable_set to have PersistentObject set @fault directly … but so can everybody else.

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