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Disclaimer: I haven't been able to clearly describe exactly what I am trying to do, so I hope the example will be clearer than my explanation! Please suggest any re-phrasing to make it clearer. :)


Is it possible to override functions with more specific versions than those required by an interface in order to handle subclasses of the parameters of methods in that interface separately to the generic case? (Example and better explanation below...) If it can't be done directly, is there some pattern which can be used to achieve a similar effect?

Example

#include <iostream>

class BaseNode {};
class DerivedNode : public BaseNode {};

class NodeProcessingInterface
{
public:
    virtual void processNode(BaseNode* node) = 0;
};

class MyNodeProcessor : public NodeProcessingInterface
{
public:
    virtual void processNode(BaseNode* node)
    {
        std::cout << "Processing a node." << std::endl;
    }

    virtual void processNode(DerivedNode* node)
    {
        std::cout << "Special processing for a DerivedNode." << std::endl;
    }
};

int main()
{
    BaseNode* bn = new BaseNode();
    DerivedNode* dn = new DerivedNode();

    NodeProcessingInterface* processor = new MyNodeProcessor();
    // Calls MyNodeProcessor::processNode(BaseNode) as expected.
    processor->processNode(bn);
    // Calls MyNodeProcessor::processNode(BaseNode).
    // I would like this to call MyNodeProcessor::processNode(DerivedNode).
    processor->processNode(dn);

    delete bn;
    delete dn;
    delete processor;

    return 0;
}

My motivation

I want to be able to implement several different concrete NodeProcessors some of which will treat all nodes the same (i.e. implement only what is shown in the interface) and some of which will distinguish between different types of node (as in MyNodeProcessor). So I would like the second call to processNode(dn) to use the implementation in MyNodeProcessor::processNode(DerivedNode) by overloading (some parts/subclasses of) the interface methods. Is that possible?

Obviously if I change processor to be of type MyNodeProcessor* then this works as expected, but I need to be able to use different node processors interchangeably.

I can also get around this by having a single method processNode(BaseNode) which checks the precise type of its argument at run-time and branches based on that. It seems inelegant to me to include this check in my code (especially as the number of node types grows and I have a giant switch statement). I feel like the language should be able to help.


I am using C++ but I'm interested in general answers as well if you prefer (or if this is easier/different in other languages).

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2  
Have you looked at the visitor pattern? –  Vaughn Cato May 28 '13 at 13:08
2  
This is called double dispatch problem stackoverflow.com/questions/tagged/double-dispatch –  Zang MingJie May 28 '13 at 13:11
    
Actually, my application of this is using the visitor pattern where I would like different visitors to visit the nodes with different levels of granularity. That is, one visitor will treat all nodes the same while another will treat all nodes differently, and another might treat some node types as generic but include special treatment of certain other node types. I removed all the references to that when creating my MWE, as this still seems to be the core of the problem. –  Ben May 28 '13 at 13:17

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

No, that's not possible this way. The virtual method dispatch happens at compiletime, i.e. is using the static type of the Processor pointer, namely NodeProcessingInterface. If that base type has only one virtual function, only that one virtual function (or its overriding implementations) will be called. The compiler has no way to determine that there migth be a derived NodeProcessor class implementing more distinguished functions.

So, instead of diversifying the methods in derived classes, you'd have to do it the other way round: Declare all different virtual functions that you need in the base class override them as needed:

class NodeProcessingInterface
{
public:
    virtual void processNode(BaseNode* node) = 0;

  //simplify the method definition for complex node hierarchies:
  #define PROCESS(_derived_, _base_)            \
    virtual void processNode(_derived_* node) { \
      processNode(static_cast<_base_*>(node));  \
    }    

  PROCESS(DerivedNode, BaseNode)
  PROCESS(FurtherDerivedNode, DerivedNode)
  PROCESS(AnotherDerivedNode, BaseNode)

  #undef PROCESS

};

class BoringNodeProcessor : public NodeProcessingInterface
{
public:
    virtual void processNode(BaseNode* node) override
    {
        std::cout << "It's all the same.\n";
    }
};

class InterestingNodeProcessor : public NodeProcessingInterface
{
public:
    virtual void processNode(BaseNode* node) override
    {
        std::cout << "A Base.\n";
    }

    virtual void processNode(DerivedNode* node) override
    {
        std::cout << "A Derived.\n";
    }
};
share|improve this answer
1  
This is a really interesting idea, thanks. Is there a reason to have UnifyingProcessorInterface be different from NodeProcessingInterface? Can't I just get rid of it completely, use UnifyingNodeInterface as my top-level "interface", and then override exactly the special cases I need in my concrete node processors (as you've done)? All concrete processors must implement the BaseNode case and as many derived nodes as they want. –  Ben May 28 '13 at 13:33
    
Well, of course you can do that. Don't know what I was thinking, I'll edit the code. –  Arne Mertz May 28 '13 at 13:36
    
Great, this seems to be exactly what I was looking for, thanks again. One gotcha (which I had been hoping to avoid but that seems too much to ask!) is that if the hierarchy of node types is more complex, then it needs to be mirrored in the NodeProcessingInterface default methods. i.e. if I have a DerivedDerivedNode then the processNode method for that should relay back to the method for DerivedNode and from there to the method for BaseNode. –  Ben May 28 '13 at 13:47
    
@Ben that cannot be avoided, but simplified - a macro can save you some typing, see my updated code. (I wanted to add a templated version of that, but thats not possible because templates and virtual functions don't fit together that way) –  Arne Mertz May 28 '13 at 14:25

You're correct that you don't want to to type-checking. That would violate the Open-Closed principle -- because every time you added a specialized node type you'd have to modify this method.

What you're describing sounds similar to a plugin architecture, or the bridge pattern.

If you use inheritance rather than overloading -- i.e. move the specialized processNode into a subclass of MyNodeProcessor -- I think that will give you what you want.

EDIT:
Or, along slightly different lines, you could make the node processor a template class and use partial specialization to get the behavior you want.

share|improve this answer
    
every time you added a specialized node type you'd have to modify this method - that is exactly what the visitor pattern is doing, which is why it is used in cases where the node hierarchy does not change much, but the actions done on the nodes do. –  Arne Mertz May 28 '13 at 13:26
    
Thanks, I hadn't heard of the bridge pattern before. Is using inheritance as you're describing significantly different from what I have now? Won't a more specialised subclass have the same issue, that it can't fulfil the contract of MyNodeProcessor and have a specialised implementation of processNode()? –  Ben May 28 '13 at 13:39
    
If you want the parameter type to be specialized, yes. Although you could do the type-checking in the derived class implementation and fall back to calling the base class method if the parameter type is BaseNode. This is still ugly but preferable to doing the type checking in the base processor class. Or you could use templates -- which are really another form of inheritance -- and create a partially specialized template for DerivedNode. I meant to reference that in my answer but excluded it for brevity. See edits. –  David May 28 '13 at 14:23
    
@Arne I didn't think we could assume that the node hierarchy was in fact relatively static/stable. –  David May 28 '13 at 14:32
    
Ah, I understand now, thanks for the interesting ideas. –  Ben May 28 '13 at 14:38

Well, as soon as drifting from c++ is fine, I think, what you want is called "categories" in Objective C. You might find this link interesting: http://developer.apple.com/library/mac/#documentation/Cocoa/Conceptual/ProgrammingWithObjectiveC/CustomizingExistingClasses/CustomizingExistingClasses.html

share|improve this answer
    
Not sure if it is useful in this case, but you're right, I did find it interesting. :) –  Ben May 28 '13 at 13:56

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