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One simple question...How to handle exception when user doesn't input the value(Optional value) and submit the form ? I'm looking for some simple way to implement..

I'm getting exception like "Object reference not set to an instance of an object."

Below is my Controller

public ActionResult GenerateReport(FormCollection Form)
        {
             int type_id = Convert.ToInt32(Form["type_id"].ToString());               
            int ClientId = Convert.ToInt32(Form["SelectedClientId"].ToString());
             DateTime Start_Date = Convert.ToDateTime(Form["Start_Date"].ToString());
            DateTime End_Date = Convert.ToDateTime(Form["End_Date"].ToString());
            //StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
           // var cm = new ContractManager();
            var cm = db.contracts.Where( c=>c.tb_contract_type_id == type_id ).ToList();

            return View(cm);
        }

Below is view

@using (Ajax.BeginForm("GenerateReport", "Home", new AjaxOptions { InsertionMode = InsertionMode.Replace, UpdateTargetId = "Generate-Report" }, new { id = "Form" }))
 {
  <div class="editor">
    <div class="editor-label">
        Client Name
    </div>
    <div id="Clients" class="editor-field">
        @Html.Partial("~/Views/Contracts/SelectClient.cshtml", Model)
    </div>
</div>

     <div class="editor">
            <div class="editor-label">
                @Html.LabelFor(model => model.cmContracts.tb_contract_type_id)
            </div>
            <div class="editor-field">
                @Html.DropDownList("type_id", ViewBag.contracttypes as SelectList, new { style = "width: 150px;" })
            </div>
        </div>
 <div class="editor">
    <div class="editor-label">
         Start Date
    </div>
    <div  class="editor-field">
        @Html.TextBox("Start_Date", "", new {  data_datepicker = true })
    </div>
</div>
 <div class="editor">
    <div class="editor-label">
        End Date
    </div>
    <div class="editor-field">
       @Html.TextBox("End_Date", "", new {  data_datepicker = true })
    </div>
</div>
       <p>
            <input style="margin:20px auto 0px 120px; " type="submit" value="Generate" />
        </p>
}
share|improve this question
2  
What are you currently doing? Post your code. –  Romoku May 28 '13 at 13:26
    
put some code user.. and if it is optional, why to catch it :P –  BaSha May 28 '13 at 13:26

2 Answers 2

You could use validation. In ASP.NET MVC this could be achieved by decorating your view model properties with Data Annotation attributes. Let's take an example:

public class MyViewModel
{
    [Required(ErrorMessage = "This value is absolutely required")]
    public string SomeValue { get; set; }
}

The Required attribute is self-explanatory. Then we could have a controller:

public class HomeController: Controller
{
    public ActionResult Index()
    {
        var model = new MyViewModel();
        return View(model);
    }

    public ActionResult Index(MyViewModel model)
    {
        if (!ModelState.IsValid)
        {
            // there was a validation error => redisplay the view
            return View(model);
        }

        // success
        return Content("Thanks for submitting the form");
    }
}

and finally you could have a corresponding view:

@model MyViewModel

@using (Html.BeginForm())
{
    <div>
        @Html.LabelFor(x => x.SomeValue)
        @Html.EditorForFor(x => x.SomeValue)
        @Html.ValidationMessageFor(x => x.SomeValue)
    </div>
    <button type="submit">OK</button>
}

In this view the ValidationMessageFor helper will display the associated error message if validation fails on the server.

And if you want to hanle more complex validation rules with inter-dependent properties I would recommend you taking a look at FluentValidation.NET which provides a very intuitive and powerful way to write complex validation rules, it has a great integration with ASP.NET MVC and offers an easy way to unit test your validation logic in isolation.

share|improve this answer

The simplest way is not throw exceptions, but validating user input with validation controls.

This way you can handle anything wrong with user input before getting to your logic proper.

Edit: since your problem is that an optional field is throwing null reference exceptions, you should check whether its value is null before using it. You could do something like this:

string value = foo.Value;
if (value == null) value = string.empty;

Of course, you should do it on the relevant property, and using the correct type if it's something other than string. You could then use the value variable instead of using the control's property directly.

share|improve this answer
    
Its a optional field not required field.. –  Mukarram May 28 '13 at 13:27

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