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I understand that a min heap is the structure that the class uses because of its efficiency. It seems to me that when unsorted data is given to a PQ it sorts it into a heap.

BUT when it is fed ascending elements according to the compareTo method it waits to sort it into a heap after the first action is preformed on the PQ.

Do you know why this is? I don’t understand why it does not sort it automatically as is the case with unordered data.

I have attached a program that I think demonstrates my issue.

output:

Unsorted Data:

[A, B, D, C, L, F, E, J]

A

[B, C, D, J, L, F, E]

[1, 2, 4, 3, 12, 6, 5, 10]

1

[2, 3, 4, 10, 12, 6, 5]

Sorted data:

[A, B, C, D, E, F, G, H]

A

[B, D, C, H, E, F, G]

[1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8]

1

[2, 4, 3, 8, 5, 6, 7]

import java.util.PriorityQueue;

public class Queue2
{
    public static void main(String[] args)
    {
        PriorityQueue<String> pQueue = new PriorityQueue<String>();

        pQueue.add("A");
        pQueue.add("C");
        pQueue.add("F");
        pQueue.add("B");
        pQueue.add("L");
        pQueue.add("D");
        pQueue.add("E");
        pQueue.add("J");
        System.out.println(pQueue); 
        System.out.println(pQueue.remove());
        System.out.println(pQueue);

        System.out.println();

        PriorityQueue<Integer> pQueue2 = new PriorityQueue<Integer>();

        pQueue2.add(1);
        pQueue2.add(3);
        pQueue2.add(6);
        pQueue2.add(2);
        pQueue2.add(12);
        pQueue2.add(4);
        pQueue2.add(5);
        pQueue2.add(10);
        System.out.println(pQueue2); 
        System.out.println(pQueue2.remove());
        System.out.println(pQueue2);

        System.out.println();

        PriorityQueue<String> pQueue3 = new PriorityQueue<String>();

        pQueue3.add("A");
        pQueue3.add("B");
        pQueue3.add("C");
        pQueue3.add("D");
        pQueue3.add("E");
        pQueue3.add("F");
        pQueue3.add("G");
        pQueue3.add("H");
        System.out.println(pQueue3); 
        System.out.println(pQueue3.remove());
        System.out.println(pQueue3);

        System.out.println();

        PriorityQueue<Integer> pQueue4 = new PriorityQueue<Integer>();

        pQueue4.add(1);
        pQueue4.add(2);
        pQueue4.add(3);
        pQueue4.add(4);
        pQueue4.add(5);
        pQueue4.add(6);
        pQueue4.add(7);
        pQueue4.add(8);
        System.out.println(pQueue4); 
        System.out.println(pQueue4.remove());
        System.out.println(pQueue4);

    }
}
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2 Answers 2

From the documentation of PriorityQueue

The head of this queue is the least element with respect to the specified ordering. If multiple elements are tied for least value, the head is one of those elements -- ties are broken arbitrarily. The queue retrieval operations poll, remove, peek, and element access the element at the head of the queue.

And

This class and its iterator implement all of the optional methods of the Collection and Iterator interfaces. The Iterator provided in method iterator() is not guaranteed to traverse the elements of the priority queue in any particular order. If you need ordered traversal, consider using Arrays.sort(pq.toArray()).

That is why when you print the queue (with System.out) internally iterator is used and hence no guarenty of Sorted output... but if you use poll() multiple times you will definately see the objects returning in Ordered Manner in both the cases

share|improve this answer

So you know that there is a (binary) heap underlying the queue, right? The heap should adhere to two properties:

  • The shape property: the tree is a complete binary tree; that is, all levels of the tree, except possibly the last one (deepest) are fully filled, and, if the last level of the tree is not complete, the nodes of that level are filled from left to right.
  • The heap property: each node is greater than or equal to each of its children according to a comparison predicate defined for the data structure.

So how are elements inserted? Just do a BFS until you hit an empty spot (put the element in that spot), or find another element that's bigger than the current one (replace that one with the new element and continue with the bigger element).

Let's work through two of your examples. I'll write the tree level-by-level, so [A][BC][D---] means a tree with A as a root, B and C children of A, and D a child of B.

Let's look at the first example: [A, C, F, B, L, D, E, J]. This is how the heap grows:

[A]
[A][C-]
[A][CF]
[A][BF][C---]
[A][BF][CL--]
[A][BD][CLF-]
[A][BD][CLFE]
[A][BD][CLFE][J-------]

Now look at your sorted example: [A, B, C, D, E, F, G, H]. This is how that heap grows:

[A]
[A][B-]
[A][BC]
[A][BC][D---]
[A][BC][DE--]
[A][BC][DEF-]
[A][BC][DEFG]
[A][BC][DEFG][H-------]

So indeed, the underlying array contains all elements in sorted order.


So, why is this order distorted when the first element is removed? In order to satisfy both heap properties, the empty spot is repetitively filled with the smallest child of that spot.

Let's have a look at the last example after removing A (I mark the empty spot by *):

[*][BC][DEFG][H-------]
[B][*C][DEFG][H-------]
[B][DC][*EFG][H-------]
[B][DC][HEFG]

This also corresponds to the output you gave.

share|improve this answer
    
So what I think you are saying is the ordered information meets the shape and heap properties and therefore is a min BINARY heap and does not need to be changed. It is only changed when an item is removed. Whereas the unordered data needs to be ordered into a heap before it can be changed. Therefore my question would be a bad one because the sorted data is in a heap. –  user2428874 May 29 '13 at 20:12
    
@user2428874 well, I don't think it's a bad question, but the rest is quite much like that. What you print is the underlying array, which indeed represents the binary min heap. –  Vincent van der Weele May 29 '13 at 20:20
    
Thanks for your help with this. I feel kind of silly but your explanation really did help. I just could not make the connection earlier. Thanks again! –  user2428874 May 29 '13 at 21:10

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