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I have a Bash script:

src="/home/xubuntu/Documents"
mkdir -p "$src/folder1"
src="$src/folder1"

# Do something

printf "SRC IS: $src\n"
src=`cd ..` # RETURN TO PARENT DIRECTORY
printf "SRC IS: $src\n"

Basically I want to create a new folder, then do something inside the folder and after that's done I want to return to the parent directory Documents. For some reason however, src=`cd ..` returns nothing.

SRC IS: /home/xubuntu/Documents
SRC IS: 

Any ideas why?

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The change in directory is local to the shell created by the backticks. cd itself has not output, which is why src is empty. –  chepner May 28 '13 at 15:44

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can access to the parent :

src=$(cd ..&&pwd)

Much better and without using cd:

src=${src%/*} # src is the parent directory
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What does hello do in this instance? –  Travv92 May 28 '13 at 15:42
    
@Travv92 , answer updated. –  tarrsalah May 28 '13 at 15:43
    
Thanks buddy, worked like a charm using the second solution :) –  Travv92 May 28 '13 at 15:44
    
@Travv92 You are welcome. –  tarrsalah May 28 '13 at 15:45

cd is just to change directory, not to display it; that is done with pwd; i.e.

cd ..
src=`pwd` 

#or slightly faster
src=$PWD
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what is happening is you are assigning the output from the command "cd .." to src which (as you can see when you do it on the command line) is nothing. Use readlink -f to accomplish what you need.

What you want to do instead is this:

src="/home/xubuntu/Documents"
mkdir -p "$src/folder1"
src="$src/folder1"

# Do something

printf "SRC IS: $src\n"
src=`readlink -f $src/..` # RETURN TO PARENT DIRECTORY
printf "SRC IS: $src\n"

i assume thats what you wanted to do, return the the src it's parent folder.

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