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I want to be able to iterate over every character in a C++ string. What would be the easiest way to do this? Convert it to a C string first? I haven't actually been able to get it to work any way, but here's what I've tried so far:

string word = "Foobar";  
for (int i=0; i<word.length(); ++i) {
  cout << word.data()[i] << endl;
}
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7  
operator[] is overloaded for std::string. So simply cout << word[i] << endl;. –  Oliver Charlesworth May 28 '13 at 15:31

6 Answers 6

up vote 5 down vote accepted

you can use operator[] on string directly. it is overloaded.

string word = "Foobar";  
for (size_t i=0; i<word.length(); ++i) {
  cout << word[i] << endl;
}
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You should use Iterator. This method works with most of STL's container.

#include <iostream>
#include <string>

int main()
{
  std::string str("Hello world !");

  for (std::string::iterator it = str.begin(); it != str.end(); ++it)
     std::cout << *it << std::endl;                                              
}
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std::string exposes random access iterators so you can use those to iterator over every character in the string.

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The easiest way to iterate over the whole string is to use a C++11 range based for loop:

for (auto c : word)
{
  std::cout << c << std::endl;
}

Otherwise, you can access individual elements via operator[] as you would an array, or use iterators:

for (std::string::size_type i = 0, size = word.size(); i < size; ++i)
{
  std::cout << word[i] << std::endl;
}

for (auto i = word.cbegin(), end = word.cend(); i != end; ++i)
{
  std::cout << *i << std::endl;
}
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Reminder: This notation is C++11 syntax and not valid for C++x03 –  Thomas Matthews May 28 '13 at 15:37
    
In the second loop, the auto must deduce the same type for i and size. But i is initialized with an unsigned int and size with a std::string::size_type (which is almost certainly a std::size_t). These may be different types (for example, on 64-bit Windows which is LLP64 rather than LP64), leading to a compiler error. –  Adrian McCarthy May 28 '13 at 18:32
    
@AdrianMcCarthy good point. It worked on the one platform I tested it on. I will fix this. –  juanchopanza May 28 '13 at 18:33

What you have should work (for reasonably short strings); although you can access each character as word[i] without messing around with pointers.

Pedantically, you should use string::size_type or size_t rather than int.

You could use an iterator:

for (auto it = word.begin(); it = word.end(); ++it) {
    cout << *it << endl;
}

(prior to C++11, you'd have to give the type name string::iterator or string::const_iterator rather than auto).

In C++11, you can iterate over a range:

for (char ch : word) {
    cout << ch << endl;
}

or you can use for_each with a lambda:

for_each(word.begin(), word.end(), [](char ch){cout << ch << endl;});
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The easiest way to do it, as others have already pointed out, would be to use the [] operator, overloaded in the string class.

string word = "Foobar";  
for (int i=0; i<word.length(); ++i) {
  cout << word[ i ] << endl;
}

If you already know how to iterate over a C string, then there is a mechanism, similar to pointers in C, which you can use, and that will be a lot more performant.

string word = "Foobar";
for (string::const_iterator it = word.begin(); it != word.end(); ++it) { cout << *it << endl; }

You have const iterators and regular iterators. The latter are used when you plan to change the data pointed by them will iterating. The former are the ones suitable for read-only operations, such as your console dump.

string word = "Foobar";  
for (string::iterator it = word.begin(); it != word.end(); ++it)
{
    (*it)++;
}

With the code above, you'd be "encrypting" your word, using the next character.

Finally, you always have the possibility of going back to C pointers:

string word = "Foobar";
const char * ptr = word.c_str();

for (; *ptr != 0; ++ptr)
{
    (*ptr)++;
}

Hope this helps.

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