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I'm trying to make a Ruby class that is very flexible as to its type and hopefully can inherit properties from a number of other classes depending on the values its initialized with:

class Test
  def initialize(type,etc)
    case type
    when "stringio"
      inherit_from_stringio_with_data(etc)
    when "list"
      inherit_from_enumerable_with_data(etc)
    # and so on
    end
  end
end

Test.new("list").each do |item|
  p item
end

s = Test.new("stringio")
s.seek(3)
puts s.read(2)

I know of - or rather have read of - the power of the mixin, but as far as I can tell this isn't quite laid out correctly. Does anyone have any ideas, or am I trying something that's best achieved otherways (by having, say @content, that contains etc as a StringIO, Enumerable etc).

Thanks!

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

There's no reason to pass a string representing a class name — you can just pass a class or instance of a class. Here's a version that takes an object and switches on its type.

class Test
  def initialize(obj)
    @content = obj
    forwarded_methods = case @content
      when StringIO then [:seek, :read]
      when Enumerable then [:each]
      else raise "Invalid type"
    end
    eigenclass = class<<self; self; end
    eigenclass.class_eval do
      extend Forwardable
      def_delegators :@content, *forwarded_methods
    end
  end
end

Test.new([1,2,3]).each do |item|
  p item
end

s = Test.new(some_stringio_object)
s.seek(3)
puts s.read(2)
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I'm actually parsing a byte string to generate these objects so I have to create the objects on-the-fly but this forwarding of methods seems perfect! Just a thought, is there an easy way to forward all methods, or exclude certain methods, rather than having to specify them all? –  JP. Nov 5 '09 at 13:36
    
There's no need to explicitly list all of them. You could easily set forwarded_methods to be something like @content.methods - Object.instance_methods - [some list of other methods to exclude]. –  Chuck Nov 5 '09 at 18:00
    
Hmm, I'm getting an error: NoMethodError: undefined method ‘module_eval’ for #<Test:0x10011e148 @content=[1, 2, 3]> Does Test have to inherit from a special class? –  JP. Nov 5 '09 at 19:21
    
Oh, weird. Instances can extend Forwardable in Ruby 1.9, but not in Ruby 1.8. Tested this new version in both and it should work fine. –  Chuck Nov 5 '09 at 19:55
module Stringy
       def foo
           puts "I am a stringy"
       end
end

module Inty
       def bar
           puts "I am inty"
       end
end


class Test
      def initialize(mod_type)
          self.extend(mod_type)
      end
end


test = Test.new(Stringy)
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And of course Test#initialize logic means it could be rewritten to accept a string and determine the class required according to whatever rules it needs - which is the plan! Cheers! –  JP. Nov 5 '09 at 18:01

Check DelegateClass and Forwardable, I think this is more the direction you need to go (universal facade containers). You don't need to have classes for them per s.e. since a class is just an object and not purely a syntactic construct.

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