Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

There is this code:

def f():
  x = m 
  m = 2 

def g():
  x = m

f() # UnboundLocalError: local variable 'm' referenced before assignment
g() # NameError: global name 'm' is not defined

In both function bodies there is used variable m which is not defined when used but the error messages are different. Do Python know what variables are defined in function before using them (like in function f)? Why the error messages are different?

share|improve this question

closed as not a real question by StoryTeller, Inbar Rose, Roman C, Lex, jamylak May 29 '13 at 11:17

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1  
Yes, it evidently does. –  StoryTeller May 28 '13 at 16:27
    
no, it knows as soon as you call it. which is why you can import this/type the def into the interpreter if you want. but the second you attempt to call it, it wigs out on you. it checks from top to bottom as you call it –  TehTris May 28 '13 at 16:31

6 Answers 6

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If there is an assignment to a variable anywhere in a function, then it is considered a local variable everywhere in that function. This means that for the function f(), even though the assignment to m happens after the attempt to access m, the line x = m will only look for the name m within the local scope. This is why the error message for f() refers to m as a local variable.

In the function g() there is no assigment to m, so the line x = m will look for m using the order described here:

  • the innermost scope, which is searched first, contains the local names
  • the scopes of any enclosing functions, which are searched starting with the nearest enclosing scope, contains non-local, but also non-global names
  • the next-to-last scope contains the current module’s global names
  • the outermost scope (searched last) is the namespace containing built-in names

The error message for g(), "global name 'm' is not defined", refers to the global scope because that is the last location that was searched (except built-in, but it would be confusing to have a message like "the name 'm' was not found in the built-in namespace").

Note that you can use the global or nonlocal statements to change this behavior (nonlocal only exists in Python 3.x).

share|improve this answer

Python checks it as soon as you call it.

When importing, and typing directly into the interpreter, it only cares if you broke any syntax rules. it doesnt care about locals or globals at this level.

>>> def foo():
...     print locals()
...     bar = 34
...     print locals()
...     DIP = SET
...
>>>
>>> foo()
{}
{'bar': 34}
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
  File "<stdin>", line 5, in foo
NameError: global name 'SET' is not defined

it runs from top to bottom, and checks locals() and globals() if it sees that variable then its okay and does whatever with it.

it even works with definitions and sub definitions.. or anything else you are assigning

>>> def foo():
...     bar()
...     def bar():
...         print("never gonna give you up")
...
>>>
>>> foo()
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
  File "<stdin>", line 2, in foo
UnboundLocalError: local variable 'bar' referenced before assignment
share|improve this answer

Yes. If you assign to a variable at any point in a function (without using the global keyword), Python treats all references to that name in the function as local.

share|improve this answer
    
please, let a comment with the negative vote at stackoverflow.com/a/16808086/842935 –  danihp May 29 '13 at 8:06

When you execute a function, you actually invoke __call()__ on a function object.

The function object is created in the scripts global namespace when the script is parsed. Created, but not executed.

As part of the parsing process, the objects namespace is computed. So the interpreter can actually know which variable exists and when.

share|improve this answer
def f():
  x = m 
  m = 2 

When the above function parsed python thinks that m is local variable as it finds m = 2, so when the function is actually called x = m will raise error as m is not defined yet in local scope.

def g():
  x = m

In this python thinks that m is going to be some value from the global scope, it searches the global namespace first and then built-ins, but when m is not found anywhere the error is raised.

>>> m = 1
>>> def g():
       x = m
>>> g()         #works fine because `m` is found in global scope

>>> def g():
       x = sum
>>> g()         # sum is found in built-ins

To modify a global variable use global:

>>> m = 1
>>> def g():
       global m
       m += 1
...     
>>> g()
>>> m
2
share|improve this answer

You need to use global m inside the function

share|improve this answer

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.