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I have this javascript function:

 function files() {
    var dropResult = false;

    $('#button1').on('click', function() {
           dropResult = true;
    });

    $('#button2').on('click', function() {
          dropResult = false;
    });

   return dropResult;           
}
files();

The dropResult variable must change after we click one of the buttons. How do I write it properly to make my function return the right value of dropResult variable? I know, that it's about closures but I don't really understand how to fix this problem. Thanks for help.

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3  
Since files() returns a value, I'm assuming you plan to call it multiple times. But within the function itself you are binding click events. Do you really mean to bind them every time the function is called? Without further context, it almost seems like there shouldn't be a function at all. dropResult should just be global and the click events should be bound when the page loads. –  David May 28 '13 at 18:08
    
What is the <i>right</i> value? –  self May 28 '13 at 18:08
    
dropResult isn't in the global scope –  self May 28 '13 at 18:08

5 Answers 5

I believe you want

var files = (function () {
    var dropResult = false;

    $('#button1').on('click', function () {
        dropResult = true;
    });

    $('#button2').on('click', function () {
        dropResult = false;
    });

    return function () {
        return dropResult;
    };
})();

Demo at http://jsfiddle.net/gaby/9b7yK/

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    var dropResult = false;

    $('#button1').on('click', function() {
           dropResult = true;
    });

    $('#button2').on('click', function() {
          dropResult = false;
    });

    function files() {
       return dropResult;           
    }

Assuming all you need is to get the correct value for dropResult, the above code should work.

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I will "extend" the answer of Gaby aka, but I think he is totally right. I will make only more specific in private and public methods. and how to access to them, and actually also bind the events to a specific button you can check the fiddle here [http://jsfiddle.net/qsDz6/][1]

HTML

<input type="button" id="button1" value="button 1" />
<input type="button" id="button2" value="button 2">

<input type="button" id="actualValue" value="Actual Value of _dropResult">

JS

var files = (function(__name){
     var _name = __name;
     var _dropResult = null;

    /*Private  */
    function init(){
        eventHandler();
    }    

     function eventHandler(){
       $(document).on("click","#button1", $.proxy($r.actionButton1,this));
       $(document).on("click","#button2", $.proxy($r.actionButton2,this));
       $(document).on("click", "#actualValue", $.proxy($r.dropResult,this));
     }

    /*Public */
     var $r = {}; //will make public any method

     $r.actionButton1 = function(){         
       _dropResult = true;        
       alert(_dropResult);
     }

     $r.actionButton2 = function(){
       _dropResult = false;         
        alert(_dropResult);
     }        

     $r.dropResult = function(){alert(_dropResult);}


     init();    

     return $r;    
})("files");

Happy coding

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Update: Somehow this answer has been down-voted despite the fact that the most up-voted solution was posted at the same time, is equally elegant, and is logically equivalent. The other solution simply chooses to capture the local variable in a function closure rather than an object closure.

The responsibility of being a voter is to actually read and think about what these solutions do, rather than just voting for the answer provided by someone familiar or by the person with the highest reputation.

The responsibility that I have in answering is to only answer questions not for a popularity contest, but when (A) I know for certain a valid answer and am willing to take the time to explain and maintain that answer; or (B) for some discussion questions where there is nothing so clear-cut as the "answer," then only when I have encountered the issue many times in my experience and have something to say about it based on my actual experience.

For that reason, I am leaving my answer up (just as I have done in the past) even when someone in the community anonymously decides to downvote it without any explanation why.

Remember that the answers at Stack Overflow are intended to be a repository of useful solutions to useful questions, for the benefit of all programmers in the future. It is worthwhile to show two different approaches rather than a single one.

Yes, the other solution is elegant and demonstrates nicely capturing a local variable using an anonymous function closure. Yet, in my opinion, my solution is slightly better in the context of the purpose that Stack Overflow has, because this solution can be easily modified into a reusable function for creating many monitoring variables. The other solution would require a bit of deconvolution in order to make it useful for more than a single static instantiation of one monitoring function.

function files() {
    var dropResult = {};

    $('#button1').on('click', function() {
           dropResult.result = true;
    });

    $('#button2').on('click', function() {
          dropResult.result = false;
    });

   return dropResult;           
}
var dropObject = files();

The variable dropObject is a "monitoring variable" that can be used anywhere in order to check the status of what you are monitoring (in this case, which alternative the user last specified by their most recent click on either button1 or button2.)

In code that uses the result from files() you can do this

if (dropObject.result) {
    /* do something here that you want to do when the result is true */

} else {
    /* do something here when the result is false */
}

I would suggest storing something more meaningful than true or false (what if you wanted to add a third button and then monitor which of the three had last been clicked, for example?).

Note: Here is how I would write a smaller, more efficient reusable monitoring function for my use (not hard-wiring any parameters or names inside the function) and apply it to this scenario:

function clickMonitor(ids) {
var i, f = function() { i = this; }; ids = ids.match(/(\S+)/g) || [];
for (i=0; i<ids.length; i++)
document.getElementById(ids[i]).onclick = f;
return function() { return i; };
}

This next part just creates a dropResult variable that would be "plug and play" in place of your dropResult variable, except that you would have to check to see if dropResult() is true or false (function invocation) rather than just dropResult.

dropResult = (function() {
var x = clickMonitor('button1 button2');
return function() { return x().id == 'button1'; };
})();

In general, this is how you would use it (more than two button IDs can be passed to it, of course, if wanted):

getMostRecentClickedButton = clickMonitor('button1 button2');

Calling getMostRecentClickedButton() returns the entire button object most recently clicked so that you can do something with it, like make the font bold, etc., without needing to perform another intermediate jQuery or JavaScript procedure.

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I don't understand the need for this but one way would be

function files() {
   files dropResult = false;
   return files.dropResult;           
}
$(document).on('click', '#button1', function() {
  files.dropResult = true;
});

$(document).on('click', '#button2', function() {
  files.dropResult = false;
});
files();
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