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I'm sure there is a very simple way to do this, but whenever I search for examples, I get the two step method. Here is what I typically do:

$data =~ m/(my_query)/;
$result = $1;

I want to set $result in the same line as the regex and never use $1. Thanks!

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What's wrong with using $1? –  Lorkenpeist May 28 '13 at 18:23
    
I really like using $1 when it serves a purpose, like a situation where I grab several things from a query: $data =~ m/^([A-Z])\t([0-9])/; $HASH{$1} = $2; <-- this is how I wanna use my $1's and $2's! –  jake9115 May 28 '13 at 18:24
    
Or you could use descriptive variable names for the 'several things', especially if you'll refer to them multiple times: if (my ($server, $capacity) = $data =~ m/^([A-Z])\t([0-9])/)) { $totals{$server} = $capacity; log("$server at $capacity capacity");} –  Oesor May 28 '13 at 18:39
    
Thanks for the tip, I like the variable reassignment –  jake9115 May 28 '13 at 18:41

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted
my($result) = ($data =~ m/(my_query)/);

As noted in a comment, the my($result) needs the parentheses to provide an array context for the result of the match. In an array context, you get the $1 etc allocated to the array. You could use @result = ($data =~ m/(my_query)/);; you could omit the my but you would need to keep the parentheses; you could subscript the array using $result = ($data =~ m/(my_query)/)[0]; (thanks ysth). The key words here are 'array context'.

Examples:

$ perl -e '$data="abcdef";my($result)=($data =~ m/(cde)/); print "$result\n"'
cde
$ perl -e '$data="abcdef";  ($result)=($data =~ m/(cde)/); print "$result\n"'
cde
$ perl -e '$data="abcdef";   @result =($data =~ m/(cde)/); print "$result[0]\n"'
cde
$ perl -e '$data="abcdef";   $result =($data =~ m/(cde)/)[0]; print "$result\n"'
cde
$
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haha, so easy, I just never got the syntax correct. I'll accept this after the time limit ends. Also, is the "my" necessary here, and if so what is it used for? –  jake9115 May 28 '13 at 18:23
    
The my($result) needs the parentheses to provide an array context for the result of the match. In an array context, you get the $1 etc allocated to the array parts. You could use @result = ($data =~ m/(my_query)/);; you could omit the my but you would need to keep the parentheses. The key words here are 'array context'. –  Jonathan Leffler May 28 '13 at 18:25
    
or you could do (with or without my) $result = ($data=~/(my_query)/)[0]; –  ysth May 29 '13 at 0:01
    
Yeah, you probably could used a subscript; the subscript gives the regex an array context, and the subscript converts that to a scalar context. –  Jonathan Leffler May 29 '13 at 3:56

You didn't specify what problem you want to avoid, but there is definitely one to avoid. The following code assigns something unknown to $result when the pattern doesn't match:

$data =~ /(my_query)/;
my $result = $1;

You could use a conditional to assign something useful to $result when the pattern doesn't match

my $result = $data =~ /(my_query)/ ? $1 : undef;

Or you could take advantage of the fact that m// in list context returns what it captured.

my ($result) = $data =~ /(my_query)/;
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Good point about the exception handling, my favorite method is your suggestion of " ? $1 : undef;", which is what I will incorporate into my scripts for now on. Thanks! –  jake9115 May 28 '13 at 18:33
$data="abcde";
$data =~ s/(cde)/$result=$1/e;
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