Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am dynamically creating a list of buttons and appending them to a span. Each button is associated with JSON data that has been downloaded via ajax. The data is obviously working, but my jQuery click events are not getting the correct index data. That is, the data that should be associated with that cell is not - and any cell that I click will actually just correspond to the data for the last element in the list. To be clearer, here is what I have (or fiddle available here):

  • The JSON data

    var data = [{"id":0, "name":"Phil"}, {"id":1, "name":"Ed"}, {"id":2, "name":"Fred"}];
    
  • The HTML

    <span id="output"></span><br>
    
  • The CSS

    .listButton {
        color: #E3A869;
        font: 12pt sans-serif;
        display: block; 
        width: 100%;
        background: white;
        border: 1px solid #FF7F00;
        text-align: left;
        cursor: pointer;
    }
    
  • The Code

    for (var i = 0; i < data.length; i++) {
        var person = data[i];
        var button = document.createElement('button');
        button.type = 'button';
        $(button).addClass('listButton');
        var text = "<b>ID:</b> " + person.id + "<br>";
        text = text + "<b>Name:</b> " + person.name;
        $(button).html(text);
        $(button).click(function() {
            alert("selected person: " + person.id);//always 2, no matter who is clicked.
        });
        document.getElementById("output").appendChild(button);
    }
    
  • The Result

Click any cell to see the alert "selected person: 2"

(Click any cell to see the alert "selected person: 2")


My first thought is that this is a scope issue - meaning that when I create a new button each time, it is updating the button for each of the other cells. My first attempt for a fix was to set jQuery data in the main for loop: $(button).data("id", person.id);, then getting it back inside the click function: $(button).data("id"). Needless to say, that did not work.

What am I doing wrong, and how can I fix it?

share|improve this question
1  
Here is a working example with the .data() :) jsfiddle.net/4LM4Y –  Ron van der Heijden May 28 '13 at 18:33
1  
@Bondye .data is a horrible broken approach that violates separation of concerns. You're making your DOM your source of knowledge instead of your JavaScript objects and JSON data. Please see my "How I would do this" part of my answer. –  Benjamin Gruenbaum May 28 '13 at 18:42

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

This is how just scoping works in JavaScript. Conditions like if and loops like for don't have scope, except for esoteric cases, you only have function scope.

This problem is so common among beginners, it has a special section in MDN's guide on closures.

You have no loop scope, your alert is bound to person, which at the end of the loop is the third person.

You need to "close over" the person in your event handler if you'd like each handler to react to the corresponding person.

(function(person){
    $(button).click(function() {
            alert("selected person: " + person.id);//correct value!
    });
})(person); // close over the person

We are creating a function that wraps our handler, it keeps track of the value of person that was passed to it, so the handler knows what value to run on.

An alternative approach, would be using Array.forEach instead, which would run a function over each person in the array, effectively creating scope.

This would be something like:

data.forEach(function(person){
    var button = document.createElement('button');
    button.type = 'button';
    $(button).addClass('listButton');
    var text = "<b>ID:</b> " + person.id + "<br>";
    text = text + "<b>Name:</b> " + person.name;
    $(button).html(text);
    $(button).click(function() {
        alert("selected person: " + person.id);
    });
    document.getElementById("output").appendChild(button);
});

Fiddle

Fiddle without jQuery

EDIT: It seems to me like you're trying to add elements to the screen and having trouble writing a lot of messy JavaScript, mixing jQuery and DOM methods. If you're interested, here is how I would solve this:

How I'd code it

JS:

var data = [{
    "id": 0,
    "name": "Phil"
}, {
    "id": 1,
    "name": "Ed"
}, {
    "id": 2,
    "name": "Fred"
}];


ko.applyBindings(new ViewModel(data));

function ViewModel(model){
    this.buttonList = model;
    this.showSelected = function(element){
        alert("Selected person: "+element.id);
    }
}

HTML:

<span id="output"></span>
<div data-bind="foreach: buttonList">
    <button class='listButton' data-bind="click: $root.showSelected">
        <b>ID:</b> <span data-bind="text:id"></span><br />
        <b>Name:</b> <span data-bind="text:name"></span>
    </button>
</div>
share|improve this answer
    
This is a great response - it goes into what I did wrong, how I can fix it, and even further explains how I can improve my code overall. Thank you for the thorough answer! –  Phil May 28 '13 at 19:36
    
@Phil You're welcome, please consider Knockout, it just handles data-binding letting you focus on the important things, writing HTML like HTML, JavaScript like JavaScript, and telling it what is bound to what. This learn.knockoutjs.com is a really great resource :) Good luck –  Benjamin Gruenbaum May 28 '13 at 19:42

When you write this:

 function() {
   for (var i = 0; i < 10; i++) {
      var k = i;
   }
 }

You actually write this:

function() {
   var k, i;
   for (i=0; i<10; i++) {
      k=i;
   }
}

When you then pass the variable as a parameter to a function, you get screwed over by JavaScript passing everything by reference. An easy solution is a pattern similar to this:

  for (var i = 0 ; i < 10 ; i++) {
     (function(current) {
       // Your code here
     })(i);
  }

the function in there is an IETF with a parameter set to get the value of i the moment it is executed. You can be sure that current in there is your actual per-run value.

Your corrected code:

for (var i = 0; i < data.length; i++) {
 (function(person) {
  var button = document.createElement('button');
  button.type = 'button';
  $(button).addClass('listButton');
  var text = "<b>ID:</b> " + person.id + "<br>";
  text = text + "<b>Name:</b> " + person.name;
  $(button).html(text);
  $(button).click(function() {
    alert("selected person: " + person.id);//always 2, no matter who is clicked.
  });
  document.getElementById("output").appendChild(button);
 })(data[i]);
}
share|improve this answer
    
The problem here isn't hoisting though, it's just the fact there is no block scope in standard loops/conditional constructs. The solution seems correct. –  Benjamin Gruenbaum May 28 '13 at 18:27
    
@BenjaminGruenbaum: Correct. Removed that line - I need to stop multi-tasking. –  Sébastien Renauld May 28 '13 at 18:31
    
Thanks for the explanation - this really helps! –  Phil May 28 '13 at 19:35

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.