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In javascript, how can you check if a string is a natural number (including zeros)?

Thanks

Examples:

'0' // ok
'1' // ok
'-1' // not ok
'-1.1' // not ok
'1.1' // not ok
'abc' // not ok
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1  
What have you tried so far? –  harsha May 28 '13 at 19:02
    
Aren't natural numbers just non-negative integers? Try parseInt? parseInt on Mozilla Developer Network –  kush May 28 '13 at 19:05
    
2  
@kush Wikipedia (and one of my college professors from my college days) says that natural numbers may or may not include 0, and always exclude negative numbers. In OP's case, the desired definition is noted to be inclusive of 0 (which is indeed "non-negative integers"). Also, parseInt alone won't work since parseInt('1.1') will return 1 (at least in Chrome). –  ajp15243 May 28 '13 at 19:08
6  
What about 1.0? Is that a natural number by your definition? –  Blender May 28 '13 at 19:23

12 Answers 12

up vote 13 down vote accepted

Here is my solution:

function isNaturalNumber(n) {
    n = n.toString(); // force the value incase it is not
    var n1 = Math.abs(n),
        n2 = parseInt(n, 10);
    return !isNaN(n1) && n2 === n1 && n1.toString() === n;
}

Here is the demo:

var tests = [
        '0',
        '1',
        '-1',
        '-1.1',
        '1.1',
        '12abc123',
        '+42',
        '0xFF',
        '5e3'
    ];

function isNaturalNumber(n) {
    n = n.toString(); // force the value incase it is not
    var n1 = Math.abs(n),
        n2 = parseInt(n, 10);
    return !isNaN(n1) && n2 === n1 && n1.toString() === n;
}

console.log(tests.map(isNaturalNumber));

here is the output:

[true, true, false, false, false, false, false, false, false]

DEMO: http://jsfiddle.net/rlemon/zN6j3/1

Note: this is not a true natural number, however I understood it that the OP did not want a real natural number. Here is the solution for real natural numbers:

function nat(n) {
    return n >= 0 && Math.floor(n) === +n;
}

http://jsfiddle.net/KJcKJ/

provided by @BenjaminGruenbaum

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I am updating this: it seems it fails on "+42". The solution is not the most elegant but works. –  rlemon May 28 '13 at 19:33
1  
@Blender Honestly I'd just do n>=0 && Math.floor(n) === +n, this is what I consider natural numbers :) It's short, and it covers all edge cases by design –  Benjamin Gruenbaum May 28 '13 at 19:50
1  
@rlemon: You forgot the var keyword before n2. Without that, you're making n2 global. –  Blender May 28 '13 at 22:39
2  
Blender, see the comma after n1 declaration. n2 is not global. –  rlemon May 29 '13 at 11:00
1  
@Dancrumb Neither can I, I have updated my answer accordingly. I think the discussions in the comments may have confused me a bit on the requirements. Either way the OP knows the caveat of my function and has an alternative. –  rlemon May 29 '13 at 17:04

Use a regular expression

function isNaturalNumber (str) {
    var pattern = /^(0|([1-9]\d*))$/;
    return pattern.test(str);
}

The function will return either true or false so you can do a check based on that.

if(isNaturalNumber(number)){ 
   // Do something if the number is natural
}else{
   // Do something if it's not natural
}

Source: http://www.codingforums.com/showthread.php?t=148668

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2  
does not work for +42 or 5e3 or 0xFF or ... long story short: numbers are more than text to parse –  Jan Turoň May 28 '13 at 19:16
    
Right, and it doesn't have to, since that is not the OP's requirements. –  Chris B May 28 '13 at 19:18
1  
@ChrisB Sure it does. Those values satisfy a natural number. You shouldn't just code for examples –  Ian May 28 '13 at 19:20
    
I am providing an answer based on the apparent needs of the OP, I am not required to satisfy anything further. I desire to keep it simple and to the point. If you feel my answer is insufficient then please post an answer. –  Chris B May 28 '13 at 19:23
    
The answer is based on some of the needs of the OP. The way people show they feel an answer is insufficient is with downvotes, which I have run of votes for today. In your own words, I am not required to satisfy anything further, such as my own answer –  Ian May 28 '13 at 19:35

If you have a regex phobia, you could do something like this:

function is_natural(s) {
    var n = parseInt(s, 10);

    return n >= 0 && n.toString() === s;
}

And some tests:

> is_natural('2')
true
> is_natural('2x')
false
> is_natural('2.0')
false
> is_natural('NaN')
false
> is_natural('0')
true
> is_natural(' 2')
false
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It amazes me how many people aren't including the radix parameter –  Ian May 28 '13 at 19:16
1  
Whether 2.0 is or isn't a natural number is an interesting philosophical question :-) (Can a number be exactly equal to a natural number and yet not be a natural number? I'm not a mathematician.) –  Pointy May 28 '13 at 19:16
    
@Pointy: Well, you can prove that 2 followed by an infinite string of zeroes after the decimal point is the number 2, just like 1 followed by an infinite string of 9's after the decimal point is also 2. –  Blender May 28 '13 at 19:19
    
@Pointy I was thinking that as well, based on comments below tracevipin's answer, and Wolfram defines natural numbers as the set of positive (or non-negative) integers. Since 2.0 is not an integer, it is technically not a natural number (despite being equivalent to one of the natural numbers). –  ajp15243 May 28 '13 at 19:24
1  
@ajp15243: The decimal point doesn't change the object that 1.0 refers to. By that same definition, would you argue that 1.0 and 1.00 are not equal? A somewhat related (and probably stronger) proof would be showing that 0.999... = 1, which has a lengthy Wikipedia article. –  Blender May 28 '13 at 19:46

You can do if(num.match(/^\d+$/)){ alert(num) }

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2  
no, you can't (see the comment at ChrisB answer) –  Jan Turoň May 28 '13 at 19:16

You could use

var inN = !!(+v === Math.abs(~~v) && v.length);

The last test ensures '' gives false.

Note that it wouldn't work with very big numbers (like 1e14)

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1  
Well parseFloat() and parseInt() both accept garbage at the end of the numeric part of a string, so parseFloat("12balloons") returns 12. –  Pointy May 28 '13 at 19:05
1  
OP doesn't say what he wants to do with "12balloons". –  dystroy May 28 '13 at 19:06
    
You might use: isFinite(e) && Math.abs(Math.round(e)) == e –  pdjota May 28 '13 at 19:07
2  
@dystroy: 12balloons isn't a natural number, so I would assume that the function would return false for it. –  Blender May 28 '13 at 19:07
1  
It should probably be assumed that 12balloons is also potential if invalid input, since OP gives 'abc' as a "not ok" example. –  ajp15243 May 28 '13 at 19:14

You can check for int with regexp:

var intRegex = /^\d+$/;
if(intRegex.test(someNumber)) {
alert('Natural');
}
share|improve this answer
function isNatural(num){
    var intNum = parseInt(num);
    var floatNum = parseFloat(num);
    return (intNum == floatNum) && intNum >=0;
}
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2  
2 == 2.0, so your function will return true for '2.0'. –  Blender May 28 '13 at 19:12
    
@Blender One could argue that 2.0 should be valid because of the very fact that 2 == 2.0. Depends on what OP wants. –  ajp15243 May 28 '13 at 19:15
1  
@ajp15243 Absolutely, but at the same time, look at my comment right before this towards Blender. Maybe it should be valid. But you're right, it depends on how strict the OP "wants" this to be –  Ian May 28 '13 at 19:24
1  
@Ian As far as answers go, yes it is definitely up to the OP. For the mathematical definitions upon which much of these answers/comments/discussions are founded, I am interested to know if a number like 2.0 is considered an actual integer, or merely equivalent to an integer that is a "separate number entity". I imagine there is disagreement in the mathematical world. Perhaps a question for math.stackexchange.com. –  ajp15243 May 28 '13 at 19:28
1  
@Ian: Integers are a subset of rationals. 1.0 and 1 refer to the same object, just like 0 and 0.0 both refer to 0. –  Blender May 28 '13 at 19:31

Number() parses string input accurately. ("12basdf" is NaN, "+42" is 42, etc.). Use that to check and see if it's a number at all. From there, just do a couple checks to make sure that the input meets the rest of your criteria.

function isNatural(n) {
    if(/\./.test(n)) return false; //delete this line if you want n.0 to be true
    var num = Number(n);
    if(!num && num !== 0) return false;
    if(num < 0) return false;
    if(num != parseInt(num)) return false; //checks for any decimal digits
    return true;
}
share|improve this answer
function isNatural(n){
    return Math.abs(parseInt(+n)) -n === 0;
}

This returns false for '1 dog', '-1', '' or '1.1', and returns true

for non-negative integers or their strings, including '1.2345e12', and not '1.2345e3'.

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Convert the string to a number and then check:

function isNatural( s ) {
  var n = +s;
  return !isNaN(n) && n >= 0 && n === Math.floor(n);
}
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In the example, 1.1 is "not okay" –  James Montagne May 28 '13 at 19:04
1  
@JamesMontagne the answer's been edited :-) –  Pointy May 28 '13 at 19:05
function isNatural(number){
    var regex=/^\d*$/;
    return regex.test( number );
}
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I know this thread is a bit old but I believe I've found the most accurate solution thus far:

function isNat(n) {                // A natural number is...
  return n != null                 // ...a defined value,
      && n >= 0                    // ...nonnegative,
      && n != Infinity             // ...finite,
      && typeof n !== 'boolean'    // ...not a boolean,
      && !(n instanceof Array)     // ...not an array,
      && !(n instanceof Date)      // ...not a date,
      && Math.floor(n) === +n;     // ...and whole.
}

My solution is basically an evolution of the contribution made by @BenjaminGruenbaum.

To back up my claim of accuracy I've greatly expanded upon the tests that @rlemon made and put every proposed solution including my own through them:

http://jsfiddle.net/icylace/qY3FS/1/

As expected some solutions are more accurate than others but mine is the only one that passes all the tests.

EDIT: I updated isNat() to rely less on duck typing and thus should be even more reliable.

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