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In python, I have a list that should have one and only one truthy value (that is, bool(value) is True). Is there a clever way to check for this? Right now, I am just iterating across the list and manually checking:

def only1(l)
    true_found = False
    for v in l:
        if v and not true_found:
            true_found=True
        elif v and true_found:
             return False #"Too Many Trues"
    return true_found

This seems inelegant and not very pythonic. Is there a cleverer way to do this?

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Wow, folks. This is the fastest I have ever gotten an answer form SO. I guess I usually ask harder questions. Also, people like code golf. –  Matthew Scouten May 28 '13 at 21:12
1  
I think your solution is quite fine and it is pythonic! –  wim May 29 '13 at 2:37
1  
Common Lisp: (= 1 (count-if #'identity list)). –  Kaz May 29 '13 at 2:46
7  
@wim Pythonic: exhibiting numerous coil-like windings that constrict, cutting off oxygen to the brain. –  Kaz May 29 '13 at 6:13
2  
sum(lst) == 1 –  Pål GD May 29 '13 at 12:55

14 Answers 14

up vote 22 down vote accepted

The most verbose solution is not always the most unelegant solution. Therefore I add just a minor modification (in order to save some redundant boolean evaluations):

def only1(l):
    true_found = False
    for v in l:
        if v:
            # a True was found!
            if true_found:
                # found too many True's
                return False 
            else:
                # found the first True
                true_found = True
    # found zero or one True value
    return true_found

Here are some timings for comparison:

# file: test.py
from itertools import ifilter, islice

def OP(l):
    true_found = False
    for v in l:
        if v and not true_found:
            true_found=True
        elif v and true_found:
             return False #"Too Many Trues"
    return true_found

def DavidRobinson(l):
    return l.count(True) == 1

def FJ(l):
    return len(list(islice(ifilter(None, l), 2))) == 1

def JonClements(iterable):
    i = iter(iterable)
    return any(i) and not any(i)

def moooeeeep(l):
    true_found = False
    for v in l:
        if v:
            if true_found:
                # found too many True's
                return False 
            else:
                # found the first True
                true_found = True
    # found zero or one True value
    return true_found

My output:

$ python -mtimeit -s 'import test; l=[True]*100000' 'test.OP(l)' 
1000000 loops, best of 3: 0.523 usec per loop
$ python -mtimeit -s 'import test; l=[True]*100000' 'test.DavidRobinson(l)' 
1000 loops, best of 3: 516 usec per loop
$ python -mtimeit -s 'import test; l=[True]*100000' 'test.FJ(l)' 
100000 loops, best of 3: 2.31 usec per loop
$ python -mtimeit -s 'import test; l=[True]*100000' 'test.JonClements(l)' 
1000000 loops, best of 3: 0.446 usec per loop
$ python -mtimeit -s 'import test; l=[True]*100000' 'test.moooeeeep(l)' 
1000000 loops, best of 3: 0.449 usec per loop

As can be seen, the OP solution is significantly better than most other solutions posted here. As expected, the best ones are those with short circuit behavior, especially that solution posted by Jon Clements. At least for the case of two early True values in a long list.

Here the same for no True value at all:

$ python -mtimeit -s 'import test; l=[False]*100000' 'test.OP(l)' 
100 loops, best of 3: 4.26 msec per loop
$ python -mtimeit -s 'import test; l=[False]*100000' 'test.DavidRobinson(l)' 
100 loops, best of 3: 2.09 msec per loop
$ python -mtimeit -s 'import test; l=[False]*100000' 'test.FJ(l)' 
1000 loops, best of 3: 725 usec per loop
$ python -mtimeit -s 'import test; l=[False]*100000' 'test.JonClements(l)' 
1000 loops, best of 3: 617 usec per loop
$ python -mtimeit -s 'import test; l=[False]*100000' 'test.moooeeeep(l)' 
100 loops, best of 3: 1.85 msec per loop

I did not check the statistical significance, but interestingly, this time the approaches suggested by F.J. and especially that one by Jon Clements again appear to be clearly superior.

share|improve this answer
3  
Umm - looking at the early true timings - isn't 0.446 the quickest? –  Jon Clements May 28 '13 at 21:53
2  
@JonClements that's why I wrote most, made it clearer now. (most of the posted, not most of the tested...) –  moooeeeep May 28 '13 at 21:59
1  
I suspect JonClement's is so fast because most of any is implemented in C –  Matthew Scouten May 29 '13 at 3:57
1  
+1 For your opening line. All the answers with sum are actually worse than the OP's simple and direct code .. –  wim May 29 '13 at 13:36
1  
@MarkAmery I added both a section on readability and elegance (a short one admittedly) and on performance evaluation. As the question asked for cleverness both aspects should be subject of consideration, I think. As I see it, I have provided an answer to address both of these relevant aspects. If you feel this answer is not useful, feel free to downvote. –  moooeeeep Jul 8 '13 at 16:32

One that doesn't require imports:

def single_true(iterable):
    i = iter(iterable)
    return any(i) and not any(i)

Alternatively, perhaps a more readable version:

def single_true(iterable):
    iterator = iter(iterable)
    has_true = any(iterator) # consume from "i" until first true or it's exhuasted
    has_another_true = any(iterator) # carry on consuming until another true value / exhausted
    return has_true and not has_another_true # True if exactly one true found

This:

  • Looks to make sure i has any true value
  • Keeps looking from that point in the iterable to make sure there is no other true value
share|improve this answer
20  
@MatthewScouten no... we're consuming from an iterable here... try running the code... –  Jon Clements May 28 '13 at 21:16
7  
Also, somewhat less relevantly, irregardless isn't a word. Anyway, +1, elegant and concise answer. –  Lattyware May 28 '13 at 21:23
6  
@MatthewScouten as per consumption of the iterable. any will as per docs return True as soon as a non-false value is found. After that, we look for a true value again, and if found treat it as a failure... So this'll work for empty lists, lists/other sequences, and any iterable... –  Jon Clements May 28 '13 at 21:31
13  
this is such a cool solution! –  Joran Beasley May 28 '13 at 21:45
10  
@MathewScouten Side effects break all theorems! x and not x = False is only correct if x is referentially transparent. –  Ben May 28 '13 at 22:04

It depends if you are just looking for the value True or are also looking for other values that would evaluate to True logically (like 11 or "hello"). If the former:

def only1(l):
    return l.count(True) == 1

If the latter:

def only1(l):
    return sum(bool(e) for e in l) == 1

since this would do both the counting and the conversion in a single iteration without having to build a new list.

share|improve this answer
    
In Python 3: list(map(bool, l)).count(True) –  poke May 28 '13 at 20:56
    
This only finds the literal True, not other true values (ie: positive ints not empty containers, etc) –  Matthew Scouten May 28 '13 at 20:56
5  
Just to point out to the OP this likely won't short circuit when more than one "True" value is found, so their code may give them more efficiency in certain circumstances. –  NominSim May 28 '13 at 20:59
2  
The second function can be written as return sum(bool(e) for e in l) == 1. bool subclasses int and True/False behave as 1/0 regarding arithmetic. –  delnan May 28 '13 at 21:00
1  
I would avoid using l as a variable name (it looks too much like 1 here), and I would rewrite sum(bool(e) for e in l) as sum(1 for e in l if e) –  wim May 29 '13 at 2:21

A one-line answer that retains the short-circuiting behavior:

from itertools import ifilter, islice

def only1(l):
    return len(list(islice(ifilter(None, l), 2))) == 1

This will be significantly faster than the other alternatives here for very large iterables that have two or more true values relatively early.

ifilter(None, itr) gives an iterable that will only yield truthy elements (x is truthy if bool(x) returns True). islice(itr, 2) gives an iterable that will only yield the first two elements of itr. By converting this to a list and checking that the length is equal to one we can verify that exactly one truthy element exists without needing to check any additional elements after we have found two.

Here are some timing comparisons:

  • Setup code:

    In [1]: from itertools import islice, ifilter
    
    In [2]: def fj(l): return len(list(islice(ifilter(None, l), 2))) == 1
    
    In [3]: def david(l): return sum(bool(e) for e in l) == 1
    
  • Exhibiting short-circuit behavior:

    In [4]: l = range(1000000)
    
    In [5]: %timeit fj(l)
    1000000 loops, best of 3: 1.77 us per loop
    
    In [6]: %timeit david(l)
    1 loops, best of 3: 194 ms per loop
    
  • Large list where short-circuiting does not occur:

    In [7]: l = [0] * 1000000
    
    In [8]: %timeit fj(l)
    100 loops, best of 3: 10.2 ms per loop
    
    In [9]: %timeit david(l)
    1 loops, best of 3: 189 ms per loop
    
  • Small list:

    In [10]: l = [0]
    
    In [11]: %timeit fj(l)
    1000000 loops, best of 3: 1.77 us per loop
    
    In [12]: %timeit david(l)
    1000000 loops, best of 3: 990 ns per loop
    

So the sum() approach is faster for very small lists, but as the input list gets larger my version is faster even when short-circuiting is not possible. When short-circuiting is possible on a large input, the performance difference is clear.

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5  
Ouch. Took me thrice as long as the other options to understand. If short-circuiting is important, I'd take OP's code as it is much more obvious and roughly as efficient. –  delnan May 28 '13 at 21:02
    
+1. Very cool and efficient. –  poke May 28 '13 at 21:02
1  
Up vote for style, and retaining the short circuit. But this is harder to read. –  Matthew Scouten May 28 '13 at 21:03
1  
+1. The only one to reproduce the OP's full intention of short-circuiting. –  NominSim May 28 '13 at 21:04
1  
+1 if you provide some timeit experimentation for an objective performance-wise comparison to the OP solution. –  moooeeeep May 28 '13 at 21:08
>>> l = [0, 0, 1, 0, 0]
>>> has_one_true = len([ d for d in l if d ]) == 1
>>> has_one_true
True
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2  
Why was this downvoted? I think it is the simplest and most readable of all. –  dansalmo Jun 7 '13 at 19:00

I wanted to earn the necromancer badge, so I generalized the Jon Clements' excellent answer, preserving the benefits of short-circuiting logic and fast predicate checking with any and all.

Thus here is:

N(trues) = n

def n_trues(iterable, n=1):
    i = iter(iterable)
    return all(any(i) for j in range(n)) and not any(i)

N(trues) <= n:

def up_to_n_trues(iterable, n=1):
    i = iter(iterable)
    all(any(i) for j in range(n))
    return not any(i)

N(trues) >= n:

def at_least_n_trues(iterable, n=1):
    i = iter(iterable)
    return all(any(i) for j in range(n))

m <= N(trues) <= n

def m_to_n_trues(iterable, m=1, n=1):
    i = iter(iterable)
    assert m <= n
    return at_least_n_trues(i, m) and up_to_n_trues(i, n - m)
share|improve this answer

This seems to work and should be able to handle any iterable, not justlists. It short-circuits whenever possible to maximize efficiency. Works in both Python 2 and 3.

def only1(iterable):
    for i, x in enumerate(iterable):  # check each item in iterable
        if x: break                   # truthy value found
    else:
        return False                  # no truthy value found
    for x in iterable[i+1:]:          # one was found, see if there are any more
        if x: return False            #   found another...
    return True                       # only a single truthy value found

testcases = [  # [[iterable, expected result], ... ]
    [[                          ], False],
    [[False, False, False, False], False],
    [[True,  False, False, False], True],
    [[False, True,  False, False], True],
    [[False, False, False, True],  True],
    [[True,  False, True,  False], False],
    [[True,  True,  True,  True],  False],
]

for i, testcase in enumerate(testcases):
    correct = only1(testcase[0]) == testcase[1]
    print('only1(testcase[{}]): {}{}'.format(i, only1(testcase[0]),
                                             '' if correct else
                                             ', error given '+str(testcase[0])))

Output:

only1(testcase[0]): False
only1(testcase[1]): False
only1(testcase[2]): True
only1(testcase[3]): True
only1(testcase[4]): True
only1(testcase[5]): False
only1(testcase[6]): False
share|improve this answer
    
I like this approach, how about reworking the logic around iter(x for x in my_list if x) and then using next, maybe nicer than using map and list.index –  wim May 29 '13 at 13:45
    
@wim: Although I didn't use the approach you suggested, your comment inspired me to revise my original answer and make it even more incremental in nature and gets rid of the map and list.index. –  martineau May 29 '13 at 15:14
    
+1 yes, that's even clearer –  wim May 29 '13 at 22:17

You can do:

x = [bool(i) for i in x]
return x.count(True) == 1

Or

x = map(bool, x)
return x.count(True) == 1

Building on @JoranBeasley's method:

sum(map(bool, x)) == 1
share|improve this answer

If there is only one True, then the length of the Trues should be one:

def only_1(l): return 1 == len(filter(None, l))
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Maybe you could explain your answer? –  Linus Caldwell May 28 '13 at 21:47
if sum([bool(x) for x in list]) == 1

(Assuming all your values are booleanish.)

This would probably be faster just summing it

sum(list) == 1   

although it may cause some problems depending on the data types in your list.

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1  
Some capitalization and punctuation would be nice here. –  Steven Rumbalski May 28 '13 at 21:32
    
bah thats why I didn't major in English :P –  Joran Beasley May 28 '13 at 21:47
    
@StevenRumbalski Ok :P –  Doorknob 冰 May 28 '13 at 22:51

@JonClements` solution extended for at most N True values:

# Extend any() to n true values
def _NTrue(i, n=1):
    for x in xrange(n):
        if any(i): # False for empty
            continue
        else:
            return False
    return True

def NTrue(iterable, n=1):
    i = iter(iterable)
    return any(i) and not _NTrue(i, n)

edit: better version

def test(iterable, n=1): 
    i = iter(iterable) 
    return sum(any(i) for x in xrange(n+1)) <= n 

edit2: include at least m True's and at most n True's

def test(iterable, n=1, m=1): 
    i = iter(iterable) 
    return  m <= sum(any(i) for x in xrange(n+1)) <= n
share|improve this answer
1  
No, I mean at most. It returns True if at most N true-valued values exist: e.g. 3 Trues in a list of 1000 would get iterable.count(True) = 3, NTrue(iterable, 1) = False, NTrue(iterable, 2) = False, NTrue(iterable, 3) = True, NTrue(iterable, 4) = True, ... It basically extends the and not any(i) part to and not any(i) and not any(i) and not... –  Nisan.H May 28 '13 at 22:27
1  
Doesn't all(any(i) for i in xrange(n)) and not any(i) work here? –  Eric May 28 '13 at 23:15
    
@Eric that would only return True for exactly n true's. It did give me the idea to sum over the anys, though. –  Nisan.H May 29 '13 at 3:49
    
You rather mean any(i) and not all(any(i) for x in xrange(n)) ? –  moooeeeep Jun 6 '13 at 7:40
    
@moooeeeep Isn't True and not all(<n booleans>) logically the same as count(True) <= n? The idea is still to test the smallest possible set and break on the first failure condition. –  Nisan.H Jun 6 '13 at 16:14
def only1(l)
    sum(map(lambda x: 1 if x else 0, l)) == 1

Explanation: The map function maps a list to another list, doing True => 1 and False => 0. We now have a list of 0s and 1s instead of True or False. Now we simply sum this list and if it is 1, there was only one True value.

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Is this what you're looking for?

sum(l) == 1
share|improve this answer
    
This fails for a list: [2], since the author did not specify that the elements must only be True and False, or 1 and 0 –  vtlinh Aug 12 at 23:58
import collections

def only_n(l, testval=True, n=1):
    counts = collections.Counter(l)
    return counts[testval] == n

Linear time. Uses the built-in Counter class, which is what you should be using to check counts.

Re-reading your question, it looks like you actually want to check that there is only one truthy value, rather than one True value. Try this:

import collections

def only_n(l, testval=True, coerce=bool, n=1):
    counts = collections.Counter((coerce(x) for x in l))
    return counts[testval] == n

While you can get better best case performance, nothing has better worst-case performance. This is also short and easy to read.

Here's a version optimised for best-case performance:

import collections
import itertools

def only_n(l, testval=True, coerce=bool, n=1):
    counts = collections.Counter()
    def iterate_and_count():
        for x in itertools.imap(coerce,l):
            yield x
            if x == testval and counts[testval] > n:
               break
    counts.update(iterate_and_count())
    return counts[testval] == n

The worst case performance has a high k (as in O(kn+c)), but it is completely general.

Here's an ideone to experiment with performance: http://ideone.com/ZRrv2m

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