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I have an exam tomorrow for which I need to know about both fixed and floating point representations. I think I've understood the basic idea behind both, but when it comes to comparing their features I'm not quite sure about the details. I'll note down what I feel is correct from the understanding that I have about both, and would greatly appreciate it if someone could confirm whether it's correct or point out what's wrong.

Fixed point -

a. Faster than floating point implementation

b. Can represent any value accurately within its range

c. Allows simple multiplication by 2

Floating point -

a. Provides best resolution (I'm assuming resolution means precision)

b. Copes with a wide range of numbers

c. Can't represent some values with exact accuracy in its range

d. Implementation is slightly more complicated

Thank you.

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Re: "[Fixed point] Can represent any value accurately within its range": Maybe I'm misunderstanding what you mean by that, but I don't think it's true. For example, 1/3 can't be represented exactly by any fixed-point system I've ever encountered. –  ruakh May 28 '13 at 22:13
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Most of the above are either completely wrong or too vague. –  Paul R May 28 '13 at 22:16
    
ruakh - Now that I think about it, I agree that 1/3 would have a more accurate floating point representation. Does this mean that floating point has better accuracy AND precision as compared to fixed point? PaulR - Sorry about that. This was one of the questions in an assignment which I struggled to answer because the concepts weren't explained very clearly. I'm just basing all this off stuff I've read on Wikipedia/other parts of the net. –  Noble Six Taniguchi May 28 '13 at 22:19
    
I've put together some comments in an answer below now. –  Paul R May 28 '13 at 22:22
    
That was very helpful, thank you! –  Noble Six Taniguchi May 28 '13 at 22:31

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Fixed point -

a. Faster than floating point implementation
- TRUE/FALSE - can be faster or slower depending on hardware

b. Can represent any value accurately within its range
- FALSE

c. Allows simple multiplication by 2
- "simple" compared to what ? For floating point you add 1 to the exponent, for fixed point you either do an integer multiply or a shift left. I don't see any significant difference in complexity.

Floating point -

a. Provides best resolution (I'm assuming resolution means precision)
- partially TRUE - but "best" compared to what ? Do you just mean better than fixed point ?

b. Copes with a wide range of numbers
- TRUE

c. Can't represent some values with exact accuracy in its range
- TRUE - but can't represent the vast majority of values with exact accuracy

d. Implementation is slightly more complicated
- TRUE - but again, "slightly more complicated" than what ? Floating point requires a lot more logic (i.e transistors/gates/silicon) than fixed point, if that's what you mean ?

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Allows simple multiplication by 2 : I wasn't quite sure what was meant by that, but I guess the question regards a shift left operation to be more complicated. Provides best resolution : Yeah, I meant better than fixed point for that. Implementation is slightly more complicated : I think requiring more logic is what the question was looking for, yes. Thank you for your help, that explanation was exactly what I needed! –  Noble Six Taniguchi May 28 '13 at 22:30
    
Re: "For floating point you add 1 to the exponent" to multiply by two: That only works for normalized numbers. In particular, it does not work for zero. (I think the OP was quite right to say that multiplication by two is simpler with fixed-point than with floating-point, since floating-point has more edge-cases, and these edge-cases are more complex.) –  ruakh May 29 '13 at 6:28
    
@ruakh: fair point, but note that for both fixed point and floating point you need to check for edge cases if you're going to make a fair comparison. I agree though that the floating point implementation with be slightly more complicated, but that's generally true for most operations compared to integer/fixed point. –  Paul R May 29 '13 at 6:56

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