Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I want to generate permutations of string of 5 0s followed by the permutations of 4 0s and a single 1, followed by the permutations of 3 0s with 2 1s etc? My code is as follows:

#include<stdio.h>
int main(){

int i,j,k,l,s[5];
for(i=0;i<5;i++)
  s[i]=0;
for(k=0;k<5;k++)
       printf("%d  ",s[k]);
   printf("\n");
printf("---------------------------------------------\n");

for(i=0;i<5;i++){
  for(j=0;j<5;j++)
    if(i==j)
      s[j]=1;

    else
      s[j]=0;
    for(k=0;k<5;k++)
       printf("%d  ",s[k]);
   printf("\n");
                 }
printf("---------------------------------------------\n");

for(i=0;i<5;i++){
  for(k=0;k<5;k++)
    s[k]=0;
  s[i]=1;
  for(j=i+1;j<5;j++){
    s[j]=1;
    for(k=0;k<5;k++)
       printf("%d  ",s[k]);
    printf("\n");
    for(k=j;k<5;k++)
       s[k]=0;
                    }

                 }

printf("---------------------------------------------\n");
for(i=0;i<5;i++){

  for(j=i+1;j<5;j++){
    for(k=0;k<5;k++)
       s[k]=0;
    s[i]=1;
    s[j]=1;
    for(l=j+1;l<5;l++){
        s[l]=1;
    for(k=0;k<5;k++)
       printf("%d  ",s[k]);
    printf("\n");
    for(k=l;k<5;k++)
       s[k]=0;
                      }
                    }

                 }


}

So output is

0  0  0  0  0  
---------------------------------------------
1  0  0  0  0  
0  1  0  0  0  
0  0  1  0  0  
0  0  0  1  0  
0  0  0  0  1  
---------------------------------------------
1  1  0  0  0  
1  0  1  0  0  
1  0  0  1  0  
1  0  0  0  1  
0  1  1  0  0  
0  1  0  1  0  
0  1  0  0  1  
0  0  1  1  0  
0  0  1  0  1  
0  0  0  1  1  
---------------------------------------------
1  1  1  0  0  
1  1  0  1  0  
1  1  0  0  1  
1  0  1  1  0  
1  0  1  0  1  
1  0  0  1  1  
0  1  1  1  0  
0  1  1  0  1  
0  1  0  1  1  
0  0  1  1  1

Output is ok. However in my code I use different for loops for different cases. Is it possible to use better approach so that length of the code is reduced?

share|improve this question
1  
Hint: try to count in binary and think about how you can use operators like & and | (and and or respectively) to generated those permutations. –  Nik Bougalis May 28 '13 at 23:36
1  
Another approach would be to write a routine that generates permutations of an array of things, like an array of ints. You can find many examples on the web of permutation functions that you could adapt (e.g., geeksforgeeks.org/…) Then call that on {0, 0, 0, 0, 0}, {1, 0, 0, 0, 0}, etc. –  lurker May 28 '13 at 23:47
2  
Seeking improvements to working code goes on codereview.stackexchange.com. –  Raymond Chen May 29 '13 at 0:55
    
@RaymondChen does that mean any SSCCE should go to codereview? ;) –  Wayne Uroda May 29 '13 at 1:08
    
@WayneUroda If the code works but needs improvement, then codereview. If the code doesn't work, then SO. –  Raymond Chen May 29 '13 at 1:34
add comment

2 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

One approach follows. This solution needs O(n) space and each output string requires O(n) time.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

char *buf;

// Print combinations of m 1's in a field of n 0/1's starting at s.
void print_combinations(char *s, int n, int m)
{
  // If there is nothing left to append, we are done.  Print the buffer.
  if (m == 0 && n == 0) {
    *s = '\0';
    printf("%s\n", buf);
    return;
  }
  // Cut if there are more 1's than positions left or negative numbers.
  if (m > n || m < 0 || n < 0) return;
  // Append a 0 and recur to print the rest.
  *s = '0';
  print_combinations(s + 1, n - 1, m);
  // Now do the same with 1.
  *s = '1';
  print_combinations(s + 1, n - 1, m - 1);
}

int main(void)
{  
  int n = 5;
  buf = malloc(n + 1);
  for (int m = 0; m <= n; m++) {
    print_combinations(buf, n, m);
    printf("-----\n");
  }
  return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
An 8KB buffer is a little overkill right? :D –  Wayne Uroda May 29 '13 at 1:05
    
Until you try it with n = 8k + 1 ;-) –  Gene May 29 '13 at 1:08
    
Of course yes. You could make buf local to main and size it automatically. –  Wayne Uroda May 29 '13 at 1:12
    
Your comments at the top here are correct, I just fixed my answer. I am not offended, but I think the correct place for such comments would be on my answer. I also think it is probably more polite to say in your answer "my code uses O(n)..." rather than calling me out explicitly. I'm not hurt though :) –  Wayne Uroda May 29 '13 at 1:22
    
Note that this problem can be solved without recursion at all. (For extra credit, presumably.) –  Raymond Chen May 29 '13 at 1:38
show 1 more comment

You could use a recursive function like so - you don't have to print the result when finished, you could add it to a list etc.

The function works by starting with an empty string. At each step you add one more character - in this case you add either a 0 or a 1.

If a 1 is added we account for this by decrementing the ones value on the next call to the function. (In a more general case you could pass a list of all the elements to be permuted - then the process would be to pick from this list, add it to your permutation and remove it from the list. You repeat that until the list is empty and you have permuted all of the elements in the list.)

When the string reaches the desired length we have finished and so we return.

#include <stdio.h>

void recurse(char *str, int length, int maxLength, int ones)
{
    if (length == maxLength)
    {
        // we are finished
        printf("%s\n", str);
        return;
    }

    if (ones > 0)
    {
        // put a 1 into the new string
        str[length] = '1';
        recurse(str, length + 1, maxLength, ones - 1);
    }

    if (ones < maxLength - length)
    {
        // there are still spaces for 0s
        // put a 0 into the string
        str[length] = '0';
        recurse(str, length + 1, maxLength, ones);
    }
}

int main()
{
    const int maxLength = 5;
    char buffer[maxLength + 1];
    buffer[maxLength] = 0;

    int ones;
    for (ones = 0; ones <= maxLength; ones++)
    {
        printf("Ones: %i\n", ones);
        recurse(buffer, 0, maxLength, ones);
        printf("\n");
    }

    return 0;
}

The output looks like this:

Ones: 0
00000

Ones: 1
10000
01000
00100
00010
00001

Ones: 2
11000
10100
10010
10001
01100
01010
01001
00110
00101
00011

Ones: 3
11100
11010
11001
10110
10101
10011
01110
01101
01011
00111

Ones: 4
11110
11101
11011
10111
01111

Ones: 5
11111

Finally, unless you really want to/need to learn/use C, I would recommend using C++ because you get really nice features like std::vector and std::set and so many other things which will make your life so much easier. I would have written this completely different in C++.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you very much. –  user12290 May 29 '13 at 1:10
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.