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I'm a beginner to c++ and I'm trying to write an recursive algorithm that returns the sum of every element in an array with a value less than x.

Here is my code:

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

int sumOfElement(int xList[],int x, int lengthOfArray){
    int  sum = 0;
    if (lengthOfArray == 0)
        return sum;
    else
        for (int i=0; i <= lengthOfArray; i++) {
            if(xList[i] < x)
                return sum + xList[i];
            else
                sumOfElement(xList,x,lengthOfArray-1);
    }
}


int main() {
    cout << "Size of Array: ";
    int size; 
    cin >> size;
    int *xList = new int[size];

    //Inputing array.
    cout << "Enter elements of array followed by spaces: ";

    for (int i = 0; i<size; i++)
        cin >> xList[i]; 

    cout << "Enter the integer value of x: " <<endl;
    int limit;
    cin >> limit;

    cout << "Sum of every element in an array with a value less than x: " << sumOfElement(xList,limit,size) << endl;

    return 0;
}

I'm using Visual Studio, while I was running the code, I got this warning: "warning C4715: 'sumOfElement' : not all control paths return a value. " And the program always stop executing when it asks me to enter the integer value for x.

What's wrong with my code?

share|improve this question
3  
if (lengthOfArray = 0) doesn't look right –  Blender May 28 '13 at 23:38
1  
A for loop is an example of iteration, not recursion. There's a strict equivalence between the two, but they aren't the same thing - they can achieve the same end results, but do it in different ways. Recursion doesn't have explicit loops - it has functions that call themselves (perhaps indirectly, via other functions). –  Steve314 May 28 '13 at 23:58

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Your approach here isn't really recursive. The idea with recursion is to consider a base case, and then consider how to reduce the problem at each step until you get to the base case.

For this problem:

  • The base case is when the length of the array is zero. In this case we return a sum of zero. (Intuitively: if the array is empty then we're adding nothing, giving a sum of zero.)
  • In order to reduce our array we look at the last element of the array (ie. at lengthOfArray - 1). We process this element: if it's less than x we add it, if it's not then we ignore it. We then get the result of processing the rest of the array by the same means (by calling the same function, but with a different array length), and add our result if applicable.

So, some example code:

int sumOfElement(int xList[], int x, int lengthOfArray){
    if (lengthOfArray == 0) {
        // base case
        return 0;
    } else {
        int value = xList[lengthOfArray-1];
        if (value < x) {
            // process the rest of the array and add our result
            return value + sumOfElement(xList, x, lengthOfArray - 1);
        } else {
            // process the rest of the array
            return sumOfElement(xList, x, lengthOfArray - 1);
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
To use tail recursion I would do value = (value < x) ? value : 0; return value + sumOfElement(xList, x, lengthOfArray - 1); –  Eugene May 28 '13 at 23:59
    
@Eugene That's not tail recursive. That's tail recursion modulo cons. My function is actually more tail recursive (my second else branch is tail recursive, whereas the value < x case is tail recursive modulo cons). Either way: I'm not going to go into tail recursion at this level of understanding of recursion. (For true tail recursion we'd need an accumulator here.) –  mange May 29 '13 at 0:01
for (int i=0; i <= lengthOfArray; i++)
{
    if(xList[i] < x)
        return sum + xList[i];
    else sumOfElement(xList,x,lengthOfArray-1);
}

You shouldn't have a for-loop, and recursive functions should "return" the deeper call, so

int retVal = 0;
if(xList[lengthOfArray-1] < x)
    retval = xList[lengthOfArray-1]
return retVal + sumOfElement(xList,x,lengthOfArray-1);
share|improve this answer
1  
So, where does your i come from if you don't have the loop any more? Also how does sum + xList[i] process the rest of the array? –  mange May 28 '13 at 23:59
    
Edited to remvoe the use of i. –  Mats Petersson May 29 '13 at 0:00
    
Still not correct, as your xList[lengthOfArray-1] < x is still not processing the rest of the array. sum will never be set to anything other than zero with your changes. –  mange May 29 '13 at 0:02
    
Gah. Ok, trying again. –  Mats Petersson May 29 '13 at 0:03

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