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The value of 'a' seems to lose global scope when the constructor a is called.

var a = 6;

function b() {
    a = 10;

    function a() {}
    console.log(a); //10
}
b();
console.log(a); //6
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3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

The order is interpreted as shown below due to variable hoisting. Note that as @ShadowCreeper correctly points out, function a(){} is actually creating a local variable a inside of function b which is hoisted as shown below.

var a;
var b;

a = 6;
b = function() {
 var a;
 a = function(){};
 a = 10;
 console.log(a); //10
}
b();
console.log(a); //6
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1  
+1 for mentioning hoisting –  sabithpocker May 28 '13 at 23:54
    
Is defining a as a function inside b forcing a to be local to b , even without explicitly doing a var a. What is the magic behind the implicit local scope? –  sabithpocker May 28 '13 at 23:58
    
+1 good example –  John May 29 '13 at 0:00
1  
@sabithpocker that's the default behavior of nested function's, in that their local to the function their defined in ... developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/… –  xandercoded May 29 '13 at 0:01
    
Why does the hoisting behavior change when "function a() {}" is wrapped in parenthesis? jsfiddle.net/ZrgxX –  user2430508 May 29 '13 at 0:31

Because you are creating a local variable (the function a) then replacing that local variable's value (the function) with 10.

One way to avoid things like this is to precede all local variables and functions with "_" (underscore).

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something tells me this isn't sufficiently correct. i didn't downvote, fwiw ... –  xandercoded May 28 '13 at 23:50
2  
If you put var a = 10; at the top of the b function, you will have a local variable that hides the global. I believe also that function a () behaves the same as var a = function () (creates a local variable named a that is a function). –  Shadow Creeper May 28 '13 at 23:53
    
agreed, the implicit local declaration of the nested function a here is the kicker jsfiddle.net/AVcqr ... –  xandercoded May 28 '13 at 23:56
    
Yes, @TravisJ explained it better though. I've never heard the term hoisting, that is new to me. :) –  Shadow Creeper May 28 '13 at 23:58

This answer has a really nice explanation of what is going on here.

The summary is that Javascript is processed in two phases, compilation and then execution. The function definitions occur during the compilation step, so inside of b the compiler sees the definition function a() {} and the local variable a is created within the scope of b. Later on when the code is executed, the scope of b already contains the local variable a before any code is executed, so the line a = 10; is just giving the local variable a new value. The function definition was already processed during compilation so that will not happen during execution, so console.log(a) will output 10.

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